Platonic Project Workflow

rfp-robotRFP ROBOT: Website Request for Proposal Generator

The time has come for a new website (or website redesign), which means you need to write a website request for proposal or web RFP. A Google search produces a few examples, but they vary wildly and don’t seem to speak really to your goals for developing or redesigning a new website. You need to write a website RFP that will clearly articulate your needs and generate responses from the best website designers and developers out there. But how?

Have no fear, RFP Robot is here. He will walk you through a step-by-step process to help you work through the details of your project and create a PDF formatted website design RFP that will provide the information vendors need to write an accurate bid. RFP Robot will tell you what info you should include, point out pitfalls, and give examples.


Feature

Perhaps the most important workflow any of us encounter is the one least talked about: That is, the flow of, well, our work. Not of our content through a CMS, but of the process of building that CMS in the first place. Or, for that matter, any web project.
Many electrons have been spilled extolling the merits of Agile development and the evils of Waterfall development, the two popular workflow archetypes. The real world, as ever, is not that simple. Especially when we speak of consulting projects rather than in-house teams, pure Agile is rarely acceptable; it lacks long-term predictability (by design). And good design (both visual and technical) requires some level of up-front gestalt planning.
Every project is different, but what does an ideal project workflow look like? And how can we try to approach that ideal more readily?
Plan Ahead
There is an old British military adage: Proper Prior Planning Prevents Piss Poor Performance.
Up-front planning of a project is crucially important, especially when some stakeholder asks the all important question: “So will we be able to do it within budget and/or timeline?”
Good planning is how you are able to answer that question.
More important, though, that planning phase (often called “discovery”) is where the architecture of the project is defined. That architecture encompasses three different, closely-related areas: Content Strategy, Design, and Architecture.
Content Strategy
Content strategy is one of those fields that has only recently received a name, but has been around as long as good websites have existed. It can be thought of as the “architecture of information” (not to be confused with information architecture, which is a subset of content strategy), or perhaps design of information. Content strategy is concerned with questions such as:
Drupal Developer

Posted on November 3, 2015 in Austin Drupal Development, Austin Web Designer, Drupal Developer, Drupal Development Austin, Expert Drupal Development, Web Design Services

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