Posts Tagged:web design

rfp-robotRFP ROBOT: Website Request for Proposal Generator

The time has come for a new website (or website redesign), which means you need to write a website request for proposal or web RFP. A Google search produces a few examples, but they vary wildly and don’t seem to speak really to your goals for developing or redesigning a new website. You need to write a website RFP that will clearly articulate your needs and generate responses from the best website designers and developers out there. But how?

Have no fear, RFP Robot is here. He will walk you through a step-by-step process to help you work through the details of your project and create a PDF formatted website design RFP that will provide the information vendors need to write an accurate bid. RFP Robot will tell you what info you should include, point out pitfalls, and give examples.


The OSTraining Podcast #23: Jen Kramer, Harvard, and Bootstrap 4

Jen Kramer describes herself as “Web Design Teacher” but that barely scratches the surface of what she does. She’s a speaker, a teacher, a writer, a video trainer, and much more besides. Jen currently teaches web design at Harvard Extension School. In this episode, I talk with Jen about teaching web design at Harvard and her upcoming videos for OSTraining. Jen is creating a video series and book all about Bootstrap 4. [[ This is a content summary only. Visit http://OSTraining.com for full links, other content, and more! ]] Source: https://www.ostraining.com/

Web Developer Specialist / Network Manager – Winnefox Library System – Oshkosh, WI

Experience with web design using a CMS, Drupal expertise a plus. Winnefox Library System is looking for a talented web developer and IT generalist to work with… $52,465 a yearFrom Indeed – Mon, 07 May 2018 17:09:27 GMT – View all Oshkosh, WI jobs Source: http://rss.indeed.com/rss?q=Drupal+Developer

New CSS Features Are Enhancing Everything You Know About Web Design

We just hit you with a slab of observations about CSS Grid in a new post by Manuel Matuzo. Grid has been blowing our minds since it was formally introduced and Jen Simmons is connecting it (among other new features) to what she sees as a larger phenomenon in the evolution of layouts in web design. From Jeremy Keith’s notes on Jen’s talk, “Everything You Know About Web Design Just Changed ” at An Event Apart Seattle 2018: This may be the sixth such point in the history of the web. One of those points where everything changes and we swap out our techniques … let’s talk about layout. What’s next? Intrinsic Web Design. Why a new name? Why bother? Well, it was helpful to debate fluid vs. fixed, or table-based layouts: having words really helps. Over the past few years, Jen has needed a term for “responsive web design…

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Going Offline

Jeremy Keith has written a new book all about service workers and offline functionality that releases at the end of the month. The first chapter is posted on A List Apart. Now that the latest versions of iOS and macOS Safari support service workers, I can’t think of a better time to learn about how progressive web apps work under the hood. In fact, here’s an example of a simple offline site and a short series on making web apps work offline. News of Jeremy’s book had me going back through his previous book, Resilient Web Design, where I half-remembered this super interesting quote from Chapter 4: If you build something using web technologies, and someone visits with a web browser, you can’t be sure how many of the web technologies will be supported. It probably won’t be 100%. But it’s also unlikely to be 0%. Some people will visit…

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A DevTools for Designers

There has long been an unfortunate disconnect between visual design for the web and web design and development. We’re over here designing pictures of websites, not websites – so the sentiment goes. A.J. Kandy puts a point on all this. We’re seeing a proliferation of design tools these days, all with their own leaps forward. Yet… But, critically, the majority of them aren’t web-centric. None really integrate with a modern web development workflow, not without converters or plugins anyway; and their output is not websites, but clickable simulations of websites. Still, these prototypes are, inevitably, one-way artifacts that have to be first analyzed by developers, then recreated in code. That’s just a part of what A.J. has to say, so I’d encourage you to read the whole thing. Do y’all get Clearletter, the Clearleft newsletter? It’s a good one. They made some connections here to nearly a decade of similar…

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How to Create a Responsive Off-canvas Menu in Drupal 8

An off-canvas menu is the best way to offer a pleasant experience to those visiting your site from mobile devices. It is rapidly becoming a web design industry standard for any website. In this tutorial, you will learn how to create and configure an off-canvas menu with the “Responsive and off canvas menu” Drupal 8 module. [[ This is a content summary only. Visit http://OSTraining.com for full links, other content, and more! ]] Source: https://www.ostraining.com/

CSS Basics: Using Fallback Colors

Something you very much want to avoid in web design is unreadable text. That can happen when the background color of an element is too close or exactly the color of the text. For instance: .header { background-color: white; color: white; } Which could lead to text that’s there, but invisible. This is … very bad. You’d never do that on purpose of course! The trouble is it can sneak up on you. For one thing, the default background-color is transparent, so without setting any background the background of an element is probably white. More commonly, you’re using a background-image that makes the background a different color, and you’re setting white text on top of that. header { background-image: url(plants.jpg); color: white; } Under perfect circumstances, this is all good: But let’s take a look at what it looks like while the website is loading over a very common “Slow…

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Web Design Advice

I have a segment on my YouTube channel, where people send me the things they’re working on and I give them random advice. 🙂 If you want your work featured on my YouTube channel and elsewhere please send your ideas along ([email protected]). And I’ll give constructive, fair advice that I hope won’t leave you sorry you asked.Brandon Wu sent me this awesome site called Markd. He’s received nice organic traction with it so far because it ranked well on Product Hunt.Brandon, you’ve gotten a ton further than a lot of people do by getting an idea out there into the world. Clearly people are using it and it fits a need people have. So a huge congratulations!These are just some things that I’d experiment with if it were my project.Social ProofOne of the first things that stands out to me about the site is “Where are the Testimonials!?” There are a bunch of people…

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What You Build

I tweeted this yesterday and it seemed to resonate with some folks: Just a little reminder that it’s about 100 times more important what you build than how you build it. — Chris Coyier (@chriscoyier) December 10, 2017 What I was feeling when I wrote that was a little tired of endless discussions on tech minutia and yearning for more focus on what we are building and discussion about why. If you’re a reader of this site, you and I live in the same bubble. It’s a nice bubble. It’s full of smart people who like to chat about web design and development. I live it and love it. It’s easy to get into a heated discussion about frameworks, what type of class names make the most sense, which optimization techniques are most important, or what part of your code base is should be responsible for styling. Those are great…

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Five Design Fears to Vanquish With CSS Grid

CSS grid, along with a handful of other new CSS properties, are revolutionizing web design. Unfortunately, the industry hasn’t embraced that revolution yet and a lot of it is centered around fear that we can trace back to problems with the current state of CSS grid tutorials. The majority of them fall into one of two categories: Re-creating classic web design patterns. Grid is great at replicating classic web design patterns like card grids and “holy grail” pages. Playing around. Grid is also great for creating fun things like Monopoly boards or video game interfaces. These types of tutorials are important for new technology. They’re a starting point. Now is the time, as Jen Simmons says, to get out of our ruts. To do that, we must cast off our design fears. Fear 1: Asymmetry We’ve been trained in the era of frameworks that symmetric and orderly designs are better.…

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24 Ways

24 Ways, the advent calendar for web geeks, started up again this week. Throughout December they’ll be publishing a wide range of posts all about web design, CSS, and front-end development. Chen Hui Jing has already written a great post about feature queries and Stephanie Drescher published a post today about a tool called sonarwhal which identifies accessibility, performance and security issues, just to name a few. And if you’re into advent calendars, here’s another 16 web development related ones. Direct Link to Article — Permalink 24 Ways is a post from CSS-Tricks Source: CssTricks

Grab The Attention of Your Site Visitors in 5 Seconds

You may have the skills of a mad (but extremely talented) web developer, but that’s meaningless if no one cares about your website. Every website owner’s goal is to pull in more followers to their pages, and that will only be possible if they can grab the attention of their target audience. Most people generally visit a website because they need information. Chances are, website links get clicked on the search engine results page (SERP) because they appear helpful for those who are looking for specific pieces of information. However, the critical part of website design is to know how to grab the attention and interest of casual page visitors. The web design strategies that you use will definitely play a significant role in maintaining the interest of your site visitors for them to stay and keep looking. In other words, although the quality of information on your site will…

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Grab The Attention of Your Site Visitors in 5 Seconds

You may have the skills of a mad (but extremely talented) web developer, but that’s meaningless if no one cares about your website. Every website owner’s goal is to pull in more followers to their pages, and that will only be possible if they can grab the attention of their target audience. Most people generally visit a website because they need information. Chances are, website links get clicked on the search engine results page (SERP) because they appear helpful for those who are looking for specific pieces of information. However, the critical part of website design is to know how to grab the attention and interest of casual page visitors. The web design strategies that you use will definitely play a significant role in maintaining the interest of your site visitors for them to stay and keep looking. In other words, although the quality of information on your site will…

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A Bit on Buttons

1 The other day we published an article with a bonafide CSS trick where an element with a double border could look like a pause icon, and morph nicely into a CSS triangle looking like a play icon. It was originally published with a <div> being the demo element, which was a total accessibility flub on our part, as something intended to be interacted with like this is really a <button>. It also included a demo using the checkbox hack to toggle the state of the button. That changes the keyboard interaction from a “return” click to a “space bar” toggle, but more importantly should have had a :focus state to indicate the button (actually a label) was interactive at all. Both have been fixed. 2 Adam Silver has an interesting post where the title does a good job of setting up the issue: But sometimes links look like buttons…

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CSS-Tricks Chronicle XXXII

Hey y’all! Time for a quick Chronicle post where I get to touch on and link up some of the happenings around the site that I haven’t gotten to elsewhere. Technologically around here, there have been a few small-but-interesting changes. Site search is and has been powered by Algolia the last few months. I started up writing some thoughts about that here, and it got long enough I figured I’d crack it off into it’s own blog post, so look forward to that soon. Another service I’ve started making use of is Cloudinary. Cloudinary is an image CDN, so it’s serving most of the image assets here now, and we’re squeezing as much performance out of that as we possibly can. Similar to Algolia, it has a WordPress plugin that does a lot of the heavy lifting. We’re still working out some kinks as well. If you’re interested in how…

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The WordPress Explained Book is Coming Soon

Do you need to build a WordPress site?  If you can wait a few weeks, the “WordPress Explained” book is coming to your rescue. This book will teach everything you need to know to make a WordPress site. And, it will do it in plain English, with a simple step-by-step approach. This book forms part of a web design library. Drupal 8 Explained, Joomla 3 Explained, and MySQL Explained are already available. Magento 2 Explained and WooCommerce Explained are scheduled for publication this year. Look for even more OSTraining books in 2018! [[ This is a content summary only. Visit http://OSTraining.com for full links, other content, and more! ]] Source: https://www.ostraining.com/

Are You Designing for Macro and Micro Conversions?

Designing for conversions is nothing new, but the way marketers create and measure conversions is changing. Until recently, we’ve only really been able to measure user actions individually and do our best to build up a picture of the consumer journey they take. However, with technology like Google Attribution we can now build up a more accurate picture of the actions users take across different channels, devices and sessions. This is changing the way we look at conversions and the different types of actions consumers take long the buying process. Your clients are now measuring macro and micro conversions, which means you probably need to start designing for them. Why should I care about macro, micro conversions? Essentially, it comes down to guiding users along the consumer journey and being able to measure their progress. People rarely land on a website and head straight for the buy button. They learn more about products, compare…

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Are You Designing for Macro and Micro Conversions?

Designing for conversions is nothing new, but the way marketers create and measure conversions is changing. Until recently, we’ve only really been able to measure user actions individually and do our best to build up a picture of the consumer journey they take. However, with technology like Google Attribution we can now build up a more accurate picture of the actions users take across different channels, devices and sessions. This is changing the way we look at conversions and the different types of actions consumers take long the buying process. Your clients are now measuring macro and micro conversions, which means you probably need to start designing for them. Why should I care about macro, micro conversions? Essentially, it comes down to guiding users along the consumer journey and being able to measure their progress. People rarely land on a website and head straight for the buy button. They learn more about products, compare…

Read More →

Benefits of Sliders and How To Use Them Correctly in Web Design

In web design, sliders have become effective tools for inserting slideshows on pages. To make a page look more organized – especially those with a large number of photos – sliders can continuously run or play the series of photos without the need to click anything on the part of the site visitor. This website design tool helps to create an organized and more interactive page. This early, let’s get one thing clear: sliders are not recommended for all types of websites. The best types of websites that sliders can be applied to are those that would like to show specific locations or features of an area – say, a real estate business, a hotel, or a vacation hotspot. It’s also amazing to see in websites that need to show variants of a given product, especially if you want to show different colors and sizes of a given design. Since…

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