Posts Tagged:testing

rfp-robotRFP ROBOT: Website Request for Proposal Generator

The time has come for a new website (or website redesign), which means you need to write a website request for proposal or web RFP. A Google search produces a few examples, but they vary wildly and don’t seem to speak really to your goals for developing or redesigning a new website. You need to write a website RFP that will clearly articulate your needs and generate responses from the best website designers and developers out there. But how?

Have no fear, RFP Robot is here. He will walk you through a step-by-step process to help you work through the details of your project and create a PDF formatted website design RFP that will provide the information vendors need to write an accurate bid. RFP Robot will tell you what info you should include, point out pitfalls, and give examples.


Oh No! Our Stylesheet Only Grows and Grows and Grows! (The Append-Only Stylesheet Problem)

This is a real worry these days. I’ve heard it from lots of lots of developers. The years tick by on their projects, and all they ever seem to do is add to their CSS, never remove. It’s not just a feeling, I’ve talked with companies before that track hard data on this. Over five years of tracking the size of their stylesheet, and all it’s ever done is tick upwards in size. This could be considered problematic for several reasons: Files getting bigger is worse for performance The developers are afraid of the CSS #2 being, in my opinion, a much bigger deal than #1. The overall file size of CSS is likely to be fairly small compared to things like image assets and even the JavaScript payload these days. Fancy tooling and the world’s internet speed ever-lurching faster will probably make #1 not that big of a deal.…

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10 Steps to Building Faster Websites

Google says websites should load in less than 2-3 seconds and when Google speaks you better damn well listen. Actually, it’s not only Google that comes up with numbers like this; countless studies say you want to be hitting the 2-second benchmark to stop traffic and valuable leads running out the door. There’s a problem, though. As the web becomes a more complex medium, performance tends to take a backseat to glitzy features. Which is fine, if you want a fancy website hidden behind that blank loading screen, but not so good when most people quit the session before your first line of content loads. So how do you find that sweet-spot between a fully-featured website and one that hits the 2-second benchmark? #1: Be careful with website builders Website builders are great for building websites quickly but quite so good when it comes to loading times. Bulky code working under the…

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Handling Long and Unexpected Content in CSS

When we write CSS, sometimes we forget about some edge cases in the designs. For example, when the content is longer than we expected and we didn’t account for that possibility, our design could break. We can’t guarantee that our CSS will always work as expected, but at least we can reduce that by testing different types of content. When you code CSS, you’re writing abstract rules to take unknown content and organize it in an unknown medium. – Keith J. Grant In this article, we will go through different UI bugs from real-world websites so we can account for them from the beginning. Ready? Let’s go! A button with an icon placed on the right/left side This is a toggle button for an accordion. There is an icon on the right side to emphasize that it is clickable. However, when the area is not big enough, the text will…

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Color Contrast Testing for Web Accessibility, FTW!

Around the world, more than 285 million people are estimated to be visually impaired and need some accommodation in the way they interact with content on the web. If you fail to think about these potential visitors, chances are you are alienating a part of your audience. Thinking about color contrast is a great and easy way to make sure that your site is accessible to all of your visitors. Source: https://www.phase2technology.com/feed/

12 Qualities of an Excellent Drupal Project Manager

As project managers (PMs), we are often asked to deliver on Key Results Areas (KRAs), to put up “our best show.” Unfortunately most of us think that as a project manager, our only task is on-time quality delivery within a stipulated budget. However, in this rat race, we tend to forget what makes us different from rest: the soft skills that, if honed properly, enable us to manage our users, sponsors, and all our stakeholders. Then our job is done. In fact, a great and experienced project manager will always try to work on the following attributes, as she is aware they can place her above the rest: Visionary – A project manager needs to be visionary. He is the anchor of the project and unless he understands the big picture, he won’t be able to align the stakeholders to achieve it collaboratively. Besides this, he needs to be able…

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Is It Time to Finally Kill Off the Homepage?

As with most things in web design, the homepage has been branded dead or dying many times over the years. They’ve been replaced by magazine-style front page designs, bypassed by landing pages and cut out entirely by social media. Except none of these things killed the homepage. Instead, they joined it as part of a more intricate set of interactions with visitors – each one playing an important role in a more complex web. Now, the latest person calling for the head of homepages is Optimizely’s Cara Harsham, who wrote for the Moz blog last week, claiming her company has “successfully killed THE homepage”. Well folks, looks like it’s time to get those funeral suits pressed again. Personalization killed the homepage The crux of Cara Harsham’s article is that brands need to show users customised content based on their needs and previous interactions, thereby making the generic homepage irrelevant. Her article makes a lot of…

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Getting Systematic About Design Systems

By now, I think it’s safe to say we all agree that “systems, not pages” is the way to go when you’re working on big projects. But how do you design something flexible and scalable enough to meet the demands of a massive site or app?  I’ve worked on a number of large content sites in the last few years, and I’ve tackled them with talented Front End Developers who helped me refine my approach to design systems. Here are a few things I’ve learned: Start with pages I know, I know – the whole point is to develop components, patterns, and guidelines rather than a set of perfectly polished page designs. But after you’ve established things like mood, aesthetic, and tone, it’s helpful to knock out a few layouts instead of designing components in isolation. I never feel confident about my design decisions until I’ve tested them across a range of use cases. Instead of jumping right…

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From imagination to (augmented) reality in 48 hours

Every spring, members of Acquia’s Product, Engineering and DevOps teams gather at our Boston headquarters for “Build Week”. Build Week gives our global team the opportunity to meet face-to-face, to discuss our product strategy and roadmap, to make plans, and to collaborate on projects. One of the highlights of Build Week is our annual Hackathon; more than 20 teams of 4-8 people are given 48 hours to develop any project of their choosing. There are no restrictions on the technology or solutions that a team can utilize. Projects ranged from an Amazon Dash Button that spins up a new Acquia Cloud environment with one click, to a Drupal module that allows users to visually build page layouts, or a proposed security solution that would automate pen testing against Drupal sites. This year’s projects were judged on innovation, ship-ability, technical accomplishment and flair. The winning project, Lift HoloDeck, was particularly exciting…

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From imagination to (augmented) reality in 48 hours

Every spring, members of Acquia’s Product, Engineering and DevOps teams gather at our Boston headquarters for “Build Week”. Build Week gives our global team the opportunity to meet face-to-face, to discuss our product strategy and roadmap, to make plans, and to collaborate on projects. One of the highlights of Build Week is our annual Hackathon; more than 20 teams of 4-8 people are given 48 hours to develop any project of their choosing. There are no restrictions on the technology or solutions that a team can utilize. Projects ranged from an Amazon Dash Button that spins up a new Acquia Cloud environment with one click, to a Drupal module that allows users to visually build page layouts, or a proposed security solution that would automate pen testing against Drupal sites. This year’s projects were judged on innovation, ship-ability, technical accomplishment and flair. The winning project, Lift HoloDeck, was particularly exciting…

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How Can I Make My Icon System Accessible?

Here’s a question I got the other day? Would you suggest icon fonts or inline SVGs for a complex single page application? And are there specific accessibility concerns for either? Accessibility is especially important for us because schools use our products. I ask because we are currently in the process of unifying and setting up an icon system. I don’t think I would make the choice based on what “kind” of website I was building, so let’s ignore that part of it. I also think SVG icon systems are just better than icon fonts, so let’s assume that. The accessibility question is the interesting bit, so let’s cover that. There are two ways an icon might be used: Standalone: icon needs to convey meaning all by itself Decorative: icon is just visual sugar – the words around it convey the meaning. Pattern for Standalone Icons I’m adapting this from Accessible…

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The Tools of an HTML Email Workflow

Last week’s ShopTalk Show was all about HTML Email. It’s such a fascinating subject, as technically it is front-end web development, but it almost feels like a bizarro alternate universe. We have dozens of browsers to worry about, they have hundreds of clients to consider. We worry about whether fancy new APIs are supported, they worry about whether padding is supported. We have grid layout, they have…. grid layout?! It’s tempting to make the joke: “It’s coding like it’s 1999!”, but as we talk about in this episode, that’s not really true. Aside from all that, another thing I thing fascinating are all the tools involved. Lemme think this out. Creation Tools: Bare Metal You can create an email with just HTML. I’m sure quite a lot of HTML email is created this way. Open code editor, create HTML email, send HTML email. I know I’m tempted by this and…

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Bringing Analytical Thinking to Product Decisions with Client Teams

What is decision-making? In its simplest form, decision-making is the act of choosing between two or more courses of action. When confronted with a decision, you can take one of two cognitive approaches – analytical or intuitive. In Thinking Fast, and Slow, Nobel prize winner cognitive psychologist Daniel Kahneman describes analytical thinking as “slow, deliberate, and consciously effortful mode of reasoning.” By contrast, intuitive thinking is our “fast, automatic, and largely unconscious mode.” In other words: think, or blink.   There are hundreds of non-trivial decisions that come up in our day-to-day work building brands and creating great web products here at Viget. Which typeface combination best conveys a campaign’s tone? What mobile nav style will work best for users in an older demographic? How should I structure the code for this feature? Our professional lives can be simplified down to making and acting on decisions like these. When we…

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5 Ways to Avoid Digital Project Pitfalls

It’s no secret that every digital project can have unanticipated issues and obstacles. But when you combine best practices in software development planning, project management, and testing, you can create an ideal environment for avoiding pitfalls. In this post I’ll help you take a step back and think holistically about some preventative measures that can keep your project running smoothly.     #1 Conduct a Proper Discovery Source: https://www.phase2technology.com/feed/

16 Genius Ideas for Your Facebook Ad A/B Testing

A/B testing your Facebook ads can be super fun. There are so many different ad elements and variations you could test (and play with): The ad copy, images, audiences, placements… But where should you start? And which testable ad elements help to get the fastest improvement in results? After helping several startups with their Facebook Read more Source: https://adespresso.com/feed/

Enforcing CSS Syntax Style (and more!)

I bet you have a style that you write CSS in, for the most part. You like 4-spaces, say. You always have a space after braces and colons. You always put a space after rulesets. You only ever put one declaration on a line, and the only declarations that can be multi-line are when they are big blocks like a gradient or a comma-separated box-shadow. You might take this a little further and codify this. Perhaps you have a team meeting about it and decide on how you want to style code. You write up a guide and make it available for everybody on the team to see. GitHub’s Primer contains “code guidelines” like this. Clean code is important, you say. While style differences in code don’t actually matter in the final output (most of us have build processes in place that compress the code anyway), it matters for day…

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The Secret to Turning Ideas into Working Features

When we talk about development process, we tend to focus on process artifacts and rituals like tickets and sprint planning meetings. But how does a ticket become actionable in the first place? How do you leave a sprint planning session with enough knowledge to start development? That piece can be less clear. The secret? Definition. In this post, I’ll walk through an example from a recent project that illustrates the unheralded but hugely important definition process. The project: We designed and implemented an email builder application for iContact, an email marketing platform. The Viget players: Me (product manager), Brandon (UX), David (developer). The iContact players: Angela (product owner), Laurie (QA lead), Mark (developer). Here’s how that feature went from roadmap to reality. Step 1: Get on the Roadmap Early on, we collaborated with iContact’s product team to define the product roadmap. We knew we couldn’t implement all their ideas in…

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Combine Webpack with Gulp 4

Webpack is so hot right now! Webpack is great when it comes to module bundling and working with frameworks like Vue or React, but it is a bit more awkward when handling static assets (like CSS). You might be more used to handling your static assets with something like Gulp, and there are some pretty good reasons for that. Still, the amount of JavaScript in our static projects is growing, so to compensate, let’s make use of Webpack, while remaining in Gulp. In this article, specifically, Gulp 4. We’ll use modern techniques to build an easily maintainable workflow, including the powerful and useful Hot Module Reloading (HMR). You May Want To Start Here This article isn’t quite for beginners. If you are new to Webpack or Gulp, perhaps start with these tutorials. Gulp Tutorials Gulp for Beginners The Complete-Ish Guide to Upgrading to Gulp 4 Gulp 4.0 on GitHub Webpack…

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Open Source Web Developer: Drupal | PHP – Interactive Strategies – Washington, DC

Are you a developer who… You’ve worked with Drupal or can quickly be taught. Our developers are not only responsible for writing and testing clean, efficient…From Interactive Strategies – Mon, 15 May 2017 06:15:43 GMT – View all Washington jobs Source: http://rss.indeed.com/rss?q=Drupal+Developer

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