Posts Tagged:responsive design

rfp-robotRFP ROBOT: Website Request for Proposal Generator

The time has come for a new website (or website redesign), which means you need to write a website request for proposal or web RFP. A Google search produces a few examples, but they vary wildly and don’t seem to speak really to your goals for developing or redesigning a new website. You need to write a website RFP that will clearly articulate your needs and generate responses from the best website designers and developers out there. But how?

Have no fear, RFP Robot is here. He will walk you through a step-by-step process to help you work through the details of your project and create a PDF formatted website design RFP that will provide the information vendors need to write an accurate bid. RFP Robot will tell you what info you should include, point out pitfalls, and give examples.


Auto-Sizing Columns in CSS Grid: `auto-fill` vs `auto-fit`

One of the most powerful and convenient CSS Grid features is that, in addition to explicit column sizing, we have the option to repeat-to-fill columns in a Grid, and then auto-place items in them. More specifically, our ability to specify how many columns we want in the grid and then letting the browser handle the responsiveness of those columns for us, showing fewer columns on smaller viewport sizes, and more columns as the screen estate allows for more, without needing to write a single media query to dictate this responsive behavior. We’re able to do that using just one line of CSS — the one-liner that reminds me of when Dumbledore just waved his wand in Horace’s apartment and “the furniture flew back to its original places; ornaments reformed in midair, feathers zoomed into their cushions; torn books repaired themselves as they landed upon their shelves…”. This magical, media-query-less responsiveness…

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The Changing Face of Web Design in 2018

Inspired Magazine Inspired Magazine – creativity & inspiration daily One of the interesting recent developments in web design trends is actually the trend away from trends… or in other word what is happening is a kind of regression to simpler ways, at least from those in the know. On the other side of the coin, there’s a big shift happening in certain types of corporate sites, especially some British and American media sites, where there’s a tendency to overload pages with so much extraneous content that it can severely impact on the ability of the user to see the content they actually arrived to see. If the first two paragraphs sound hopeless tangled, well that’s a very succinct allegory for the state of web development in 2018… tangled. It’s a problem we need to sort out, because it won’t be good for anyone if web standards continue to slip. We’ll…

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Accessible Web Apps with React, TypeScript, and AllyJS

Accessibility is an aspect of web development that is often overlooked. I would argue that it is as vital as overall performance and code reusability. We justify our endless pursuit of better performance and responsive design by citing the users, but ultimately these pursuits are done with the user’s device in mind, not the user themselves and their potential disabilities or restrictions. A responsive app should be one that delivers its content based on the needs of the user, not only their device. Luckily, there are tools to help alleviate the learning curve of accessibility-minded development. For example, GitHub recently released their accessibility error scanner, AccessibilityJS and Deque has aXe. This article will focus on a different one: Ally.js, a library simplifying certain accessibility features, functions, and behaviors. One of the most common pain points regarding accessibility is dialog windows. There’re a lot of considerations to take in terms of…

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Benefits of Sliders and How To Use Them Correctly in Web Design

In web design, sliders have become effective tools for inserting slideshows on pages. To make a page look more organized – especially those with a large number of photos – sliders can continuously run or play the series of photos without the need to click anything on the part of the site visitor. This website design tool helps to create an organized and more interactive page. This early, let’s get one thing clear: sliders are not recommended for all types of websites. The best types of websites that sliders can be applied to are those that would like to show specific locations or features of an area – say, a real estate business, a hotel, or a vacation hotspot. It’s also amazing to see in websites that need to show variants of a given product, especially if you want to show different colors and sizes of a given design. Since…

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A Book Apart

(This is a sponsored post.)You know A Book Apart! They’ve published all kinds of iconic books in our field. They are short and to the point. The kind of book you can read in a single flight. I wrote on not so long ago called Practical SVG. Fortunately for us both, SVG isn’t the most fast-moving technology out there, so reading this book now and using what you learn is just as useful now as it ever was. More interested in JavaScript, they got it. HTML? CSS? Typography? Responsive Design? All covered. In fact, you should probably just browse the library yourself, or get them all. Better still, now is the time to do it, because 15% of all sales will directly benefit those affected by Hurrican Harvey. Direct Link to Article — Permalink A Book Apart is a post from CSS-Tricks Source: CssTricks

(An Interview About) imgix Page Weight

Imgix has been a long-time display ad sponsor here on CSS-Tricks. This post is not technically sponsored, I just noticed that they released a tool for analyzing image performance at any given URL that is pretty interesting. We know web performance is a big deal. We know that images are perhaps the largest offender in ballooning page weights across the web. We know we have tools for looking at page performance as a whole. It seems fairly new to me to have tools for specifically analyzing and demonstrating how we could have done better with images specifically. That’s what this Page Weight tool is. Clearly this is a marketing tool for them. You put in a URL, and it tells you how you could have done better, and specifically how imgix can help do that. I’m generally a fan of that. Tools with businesses behind them have the resources and…

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Template Doesn’t Mean Cookie Cutter

The Challenge The mere mention of website templates makes some clients bristle. Nobody likes being told they have to conform to a set of rules they feel weren’t written with them in mind. They also believe that their site will look like everyone else’s and not meet their unique needs. Developers and designers also get concerned with templates, unsure if content editors will put the correct types of content in pre-built components. Sites that the development and design team spent a lot of time building can end up looking unprofessional if the templates aren’t used properly. No one wins in this scenario. The Solution Let’s first dispel the myth that using templates means your site will look like everyone else’s. When we talk about templates, we aren’t talking about simple differences in colors and fonts. Our Lectronimo website solution takes advantage of Drupal’s modularity and Panelizer to deliver different frameworks…

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How to be evil (but please don’t!) – the modals & overlays edition

We’ve all been there. Landed on a website only to be slapped with a modal that looked something like the one below: Hello darkness, my old friend. For me that triggers a knee-jerk reaction: curse for giving them a pageview, close the tab, and never return. But there’s also that off case when we might actually try to get to the info behind that modal. So the next step in this situation is to bring up DevTools in order to delete the modal and overlay, and maybe some other useless things that clutter up the page while we’re at it. This is where that page starts to dabble in evil. We may not be able to get to the DevTools via “Inspect Element” because the context menu might be disabled. That one is easy, it only takes them one line of code: addEventListener(‘contextmenu’, e => e.preventDefault(), false); But hey, no…

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Full Page Screenshots in Browsers

It can be quite useful to get a “full page” screenshot in a browser. That is, not just the visible area. The visible area is pretty easy to get just by screenshotting the screen. A full page screenshot captures the entire web site even if it needs to be scrolled around to see all of it. You could take individual screenshots of the visible area and use a photo editing program to stitch them together, but that’s a pain in the but. Nevermind the fact that it’s extra tricky with things like fixed position elements. Fortunately browsers can help us out a bit here. Chrome As of Chrome 59, it’s built into DevTools. Here’s a video. You use “Responsive Design Mode”, then the menu option to get the full page screenshot is in the menu in the upper right. If you need a “mobile” full length screenshot, just adjust the…

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(J.O#:140617EIT) Drupal developer – ExcelITcorp – Atlanta, GA

Proficient in the maintenance and administration of Drupal modules and sites. Experience in developing responsive design websites without css frameworks and…From Indeed – Fri, 09 Jun 2017 17:50:56 GMT – View all Atlanta, GA jobs Source: http://rss.indeed.com/rss?q=Drupal+Developer

PHP Drupal Developer – BlueFusion INC – New York, NY

PHP Drupal Developer Hiring Qualifications*. Experience in developing responsive design websites without css frameworks and building custom Drupal modules….From Indeed – Mon, 05 Jun 2017 19:18:51 GMT – View all New York, NY jobs Source: http://rss.indeed.com/rss?q=Drupal+Developer

Sr. PHP Developer – I2U Systems – Atlanta, GA

Drupal Developer Hiring Qualifications*. Experience in developing responsive design websites without css frameworks and building custom Drupal modules….From Indeed – Thu, 01 Jun 2017 20:43:35 GMT – View all Atlanta, GA jobs Source: http://rss.indeed.com/rss?q=Drupal+Developer

Container Query Discussion

Right now, we have the power to write CSS that only applies when the browser window itself is at certain widths or heights. Breakpoints, as it were. Super useful. What we don’t have (natively) is the ability to write conditional CSS based on any particular elements (or “containers”) properties. It’s going on 2 years since the RICG decided to tackle this. I’m not exactly sure what the status is there. It seems a bit on pause, but that doesn’t mean the entire discussion is on pause. From what I hear, and echo, the refrain amongst front-end devs is: if I had container queries available, 90% of the media queries I write would be container queries. The thought being, you’re usually trying to adjust some particular element’s properties that are tied to something a bit more scoped than the entire browser window. Ethan Marcotte recently wrote: I don’t want to suggest…

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Responsive Images in WordPress with Cloudinary, Part 1

If you’re reading this, you’re probably already familiar with responsive images. Even so, it may be helpful to have a little background. (Then we’ll get to the WordPress part, and how to make them even better with Cloudinary.) For most of the Web’s existence, any time you wanted to include an image on a web page, you would create markup that looked like this: <img src=”/path/to/my/image.jpg” alt=”a very nice image”> In this example, the <img> element references a single image file named `image.jpg` located on a server at `/path/to/my`. This markup is straightforward in that it tells the browser to download and render a specific image file, referenced by the src element, onto the web page. This arrangement was fine until 2010, when Ethan Marcotte published his seminal article, Responsive Web Design, which popularized the technique of using Cascading Style Sheet media queries to modify the layout of web pages…

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Where Are All the Creative Web Designers At?

There’s a common notion in the industry these days that web designers are stuck in a pit of uncreativity. The open canvas we once had as web professionals feels considerably more constrained these days by the growing collection of best practices, new technology trends and the use of automated tools. So what happened to the rare breed of creative web designers – did they really all disappear without a trace or is the more to the story behind a web that feels eerily familiar wherever you go?   The same old templates argument This is where the notion of web design becoming uncreative all stems from. Once platforms like WordPress and Shopify started publishing themes and templates the web gradually started to look more formulaic. Not only were designers creating these templates within the confines of their chosen platform but people were buying these templates in mass numbers.   Shopify’s themes…

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7 New Adobe Typekit UI Upgrades To Make Typography Easier

Adobe has been a leader in design and technology for years, and the company has developed powerful products that satisfy graphic designers of varying skill levels. While Adobe Photoshop and Illustrator are killing it in terms of popularity, one application that serious graphic design experts are using these days is Adobe Typekit. What is Adobe Typekit? Adobe Typekit is a design service initially released by Small Batch, Inc. in September 2009 and acquired by Google in October 2011. Its core business is offering premium quality fonts made available through annual subscription plans. The fonts stored in Adobe Typekit can be used on websites or synced via Adobe Creative Cloud to various applications installed on the user’s computer. As of this writing, Adobe Typekit consists of more than a thousand font families from various foundries. These are offered as a standalone service and as part of Adobe’s Creative Cloud. Meanwhile, hundreds…

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