Posts Tagged:redesign

rfp-robotRFP ROBOT: Website Request for Proposal Generator

The time has come for a new website (or website redesign), which means you need to write a website request for proposal or web RFP. A Google search produces a few examples, but they vary wildly and don’t seem to speak really to your goals for developing or redesigning a new website. You need to write a website RFP that will clearly articulate your needs and generate responses from the best website designers and developers out there. But how?

Have no fear, RFP Robot is here. He will walk you through a step-by-step process to help you work through the details of your project and create a PDF formatted website design RFP that will provide the information vendors need to write an accurate bid. RFP Robot will tell you what info you should include, point out pitfalls, and give examples.


Template Doesn’t Mean Cookie Cutter

The Challenge The mere mention of website templates makes some clients bristle. Nobody likes being told they have to conform to a set of rules they feel weren’t written with them in mind. They also believe that their site will look like everyone else’s and not meet their unique needs. Developers and designers also get concerned with templates, unsure if content editors will put the correct types of content in pre-built components. Sites that the development and design team spent a lot of time building can end up looking unprofessional if the templates aren’t used properly. No one wins in this scenario. The Solution Let’s first dispel the myth that using templates means your site will look like everyone else’s. When we talk about templates, we aren’t talking about simple differences in colors and fonts. Our Lectronimo website solution takes advantage of Drupal’s modularity and Panelizer to deliver different frameworks…

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Google to Reportedly Redesign its Home Page in the Near Future by @MattGSouthern

Reports suggest Google is planning to redesign its home page to match its mobile app experience.The post Google to Reportedly Redesign its Home Page in the Near Future by @MattGSouthern appeared first on Search Engine Journal. Source: https://www.searchenginejournal.com/feed/

Making a Custom, Acquia-Hosted Site Affordable for Higher Ed

With budget cuts and rising expectations, higher education websites have become a challenging balancing act of function and affordability. As one of the main marketing tools to prospective students, higher ed websites increasingly need to do it all. They have to be responsive, accessible, easily navigated, support the brand, contain large bodies of complex content that often require custom functionality not standard in CMSes, and be future-proof enough to last 5-7 years — the next time funds might be available to rework the website. And if those hurdles aren’t enough, institutions typically have limited budgets and limited staff to maintain their web presences. Over the past decade we’ve seen patterns in the needs, challenges, and wants of our higher ed clients. There is clearly a need for a virtual “off-the-shelf” website solution that: Specifically meets the content and functional needs of higher ed institutions Allows room to infuse websites with…

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These Are the Five Hottest Lead Generation Trends in 2017

Every year we have new lead generation trends come and go. Some earn their place as invaluable marketing strategies while others fade away with a whimper. Whatever happens, there always seems to be a lot of buzz around trends, whether they deserve it or not. Which makes it difficult to know which ones will catch on and which of those are gimmicks simply getting their moment in the spotlight. This can be frustrating for web designers and site owners – especially when trends shake up design principles only to fall short of expectations. #1: Voice search Like most trends, voice search is nothing new but 2017 is the year it’s being touted as a technology that will change the way people use the web. This shouldn’t come as any kind of surprise following the release of Google Home and Amazon Echo devices, but what does this mean for voice search…

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What UX Designers Can Learn From IKEA

I recently moved and ended up buying a lot of IKEA furniture. While assembling the different pieces, I began to notice how IKEA devises their instructions to gently lead builders through complex tasks.  One of the customer’s first interactions with an IKEA product will be to build it, and this experience will likely shape the customer’s lasting impression of both that piece of furniture and IKEA as a brand. This is a high-stakes interaction, and there are so many places where it could go so wrong. Poorly-written instructions may very well end with the customer either throwing up their hands or throwing a hammer at the piece in frustration. IKEA understands this and carefully crafts their instructions to guard against rage-fueled furniture destruction. They are written (or drawn really) to guide a novice through the complex process of creating functional furniture out of a pile of otherwise inscrutable panels and hardware. But they don’t just instruct. They are devised to positively shape the assembly experience, hopefully…

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A Little Example of Data Massaging

I’m not sure if “data massaging” is a real thing, but that’s how I think of what I’m about to describe. Dave and I were thinking about a bit of a redesign for ShopTalk Show. Fresh coat of paint kinda thing. Always nice to do that from time to time. But we wanted to start from the inside out this time. It didn’t sound very appealing to design around the data that we had. We wanted to work with cleaner data. We needed to massage the data that we had, so that it would open up more design possibilities. We had fallen into the classic WordPress trap Which is… just dumping everything into the default content area: We used Markdown, which I think is smart, but still was a pile of rather unstructured content. An example: If that content was structured entirely differently every time (like a blog post probably…

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Fun with Viewport Units

Viewport units have been around for several years now, with near-perfect support in the major browsers, but I keep finding new and exciting ways to use them. I thought it would be fun to review the basics, and then round-up some of my favorite use-cases. What are viewport units? Four new “viewport-relative” units appeared in the CSS specifications between 2011 and 2015, as part of the W3C’s CSS Values and Units Module Level 3. The new units – vw, vh, vmin, and vmax – work similarly to existing length units like px or em, but represent a percentage of the current browser viewport. Viewport Width (vw) – A percentage of the full viewport width. 10vw will resolve to 10% of the current viewport width, or 48px on a phone that is 480px wide. The difference between % and vw is most similar to the difference between em and rem. A…

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Financial Times Redesign

Late last year the team at the Financial Times launched a redesign that focused specifically on web performance and improving the user experience. And so in a post detailing their findings, James Webb writes about how this design impacted their business: We wanted to keep page load time to an absolute minimum; our target was to become the fastest site in the publishing industry. To emphasize the importance of a faster website to key internal stakeholders, we had to understand the true impact site speed had on user engagement. Fortunately, our analytics team had developed a sophisticated internal engagement metric that accurately predicts the likelihood of renewing a subscription. Through a rough a series of A/B tests, we slowed the site down to see how site speed correlates to the loss of engagement and revenue. Test results showed that for every one-second increase in speed, our engagement score increased by…

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Marketing Design — How we improved our conversion rate at Highrise

Originally Highrise was built for Jason and David, the founders of Basecamp, who had trouble staying on top of who was talking to the lawyer, who needed to follow up with the landlord, what was said to the reporter, etc.But do our customers look like Jason and David?Maybe they did originally but things changed over the last decade Highrise has been in business? Is that still our reason for existing? So we recently did a series of Jobs-to-be-Done interviews to understand who uses Highrise at a deeper level.The results were clarifying.Our interviews uncovered that Highrise was now in the hands of a very different group of people with very different needs. It’s less about “Contacts” and more about “Leads” someone needs to get into a sales process. It’s less about “Todos” and “Tasks” and more about “I need a reminder to follow-up with this lead in a few weeks.” But that’s just…

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New in Basecamp 3: List view for Projects and Teams

The change from Winter to Spring can provide a lot of inspiration for our team. We take time to listen to the rain, the wind, the flowers until they whisper the secrets to the way forward. Frequently, this growing season plants in us the ideas for the future of Basecamp.Nature can be very gentle, but direct.OK, OK, the truth of our new List view feature has a lot less to do with communing with nature and a lot more to do with listening to customers, but it’s still exciting! While a lot of customers like the card view, projects with longer titles are truncated and sometimes look strange. With a large number of teams and projects, the card view can be overwhelming.Designer Scott and programmer Pratik heard the call! The teamed up to create a new feature which available to all Basecamp 3 users today. Now, you can see your teams…

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The Advantage of Comparative Research

No matter how new a problem may be to us, we are never the first person to tackle it. There are always examples to learn from. That said, the way we learn from others’ examples can make the difference between uncritical emulation and a solution that fits the unique problem and context we’re facing. Here I’ll describe what comparative research is, why it’s worth your time, and give an example of how it helped us on a recent project. Some Fundamentals of Comparative Research Comparative research is a way to broaden our thinking about product functionality. It answers questions like, “How have others dealt with this kind of content complexity? What is a good way to conduct this kind of interaction? How are different use cases accounted for?” This type of research is particularly useful when trying to identify best practices that haven’t yet solidified into conventions–ones that aren’t likely…

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SCORE.org: User Experience for 320+ Sites On One Flexible Platform

SCORE.org is helping Americans start and grow small businesses with their free, confidential business advice. In order to have maximum reach and impact, SCORE teamed up with Phase2 to create a Drupal system that is flexible enough to accommodate 320+ local chapter sites that support their own content production, without eschewing overall brand and design standard of the national site. Next week at DrupalCon in Baltimore, MD, I will be taking the stage with SCORE’s Director of Marketing, Candice Stennett, to speak on the success of this build and partnership. In the meantime, I sat down with Candice to get her perspective on the project from a marketing standpoint.  Q. Can you tell me a little bit about SCORE’s previous platform organization and functions and the challenges that led you to needing a redesign? A. SCORE is a nonprofit organization dedicated to the formation and growth of small businesses in…

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Dare to be remarkable? You need to piss some people off

Art from Kuma’s CornerSince taking over Highrise in 2014, we’ve heard a lot of feedback. A lot.It was pent up. Highrise launched in 2007. There was a mostly aesthetic redesign in 2011 and then very little development afterwards. That was the reason to spin it off as its own company — so it could get the attention it deserved.But OMG the feedback. You could point to any pixel on any page and we had at least 3 emails (more often dozens) on how someone wanted it changed or improved or enhanced for their use case.The Highrise team wasn’t the original makers of the product though. We didn’t truly understand the core audience. So it was tough to filter out the feedback. Which of it is important? Which feedback might help us unlock more growth? Which should be prioritized?No idea.RemarkableWorthy of being or likely to be noticed especially as being uncommon or extraordinaryMy wife and I…

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The Next Smashing Magazine

Congrats to the big team over there assembled to take on this major redesign process. Unlike our redesigns around here that are usually more like realignments with minor dev work and UX sprinkles each iteration, this was a ground-up rebuild for them. They migrated a bunch of different platforms all into one, a static-site based system with all front end APIs. It’s gotta feel good to pull all that stuff into one system. I remember when I used to have four different systems around here (WordPress, Forums (various), eCommerce (various), and some raw PHP stuff) and the good feeling it was to get it all yanked in under one WordPress roof. Direct Link to Article — Permalink The Next Smashing Magazine is a post from CSS-Tricks Source: CssTricks

How to launch software changes without pissing people off

Go the extra mile to avoid interruptions and protect your customers’ time.Software designers and developers are all about NEW. We like to experiment with far-out ideas and make shiny things. Our livelihood depends on it.We’re so addicted to NEW that sometimes it clouds our judgment. We love NEW and everyone else should too, so we force heavy-handed product changes onto our customers without much explanation.And if they didn’t want that? Or if they got needlessly interrupted by it?…Shhh…we’re not so interested in those problems.Dislike Facebook’s redesign? Deal with it! Confused by the newest Windows updates? Oh well! Missing some features in the new Final Cut? Too bad, they’re gone forever!It’s no surprise that these sorts of changes are comically unpopular:body[data-twttr-rendered=”true”] {background-color: transparent;}.twitter-tweet {margin: auto !important;}Cineworld have changed their app and I feel hurt and betrayed [email protected] notifyResize(height) {height = height ? height : document.documentElement.offsetHeight; var resized = false; if (window.donkey && donkey.resize)…

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Agile Research

Recently, we’ve been working on a fast-paced product redesign. To ensure that we’re making the right design decisions along the way, we’ve integrated user testing over the length of the project. Each week, we run five 30-minute sessions where we interview a participant and show them designs that we have been developing. We ask them to perform tasks and observe them as they interact with the prototypes. We quickly realized that it would be challenging to record and analyze our sessions, as our notes would grow unwieldy over the course of the project. To keep our research relevant, we needed to develop a solid system to both track and make sense of our observations during testing. Challenges Running ongoing user testing parallel to design presents a few challenges: In order for notes to be useable to the design team, those notes must be searchable. All information gathered during the length…

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How to Create Fast, Searchable Notes for Real-Time Research

Recently, we’ve been working on a fast-paced product redesign. To ensure that we’re making the right design decisions along the way, we’ve integrated user testing over the length of the project. Each week, we run five 30-minute sessions where we interview a participant and show them designs that we have been developing. We ask them to perform tasks and observe them as they interact with the prototypes. We quickly realized that it would be challenging to record and analyze our sessions, as our notes would grow unwieldy over the course of the project. To keep our research relevant, we needed to develop a solid system to both track and make sense of our observations during testing. Challenges Running ongoing user testing parallel to design presents a few challenges: In order for notes to be useable to the design team, those notes must be searchable. All information gathered during the length…

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How a Website Redesign Increased Organic Traffic by 99% in 8 Months [CASE STUDY] by @mdav1979

I hope this case study helps you show how important of an investment a well thought out and developed website can be to a company. Tens of thousands dollars might seem excessive, even to an enterprise organization, but it is an investment that returns in spades.The post How a Website Redesign Increased Organic Traffic by 99% in 8 Months [CASE STUDY] by @mdav1979 appeared first on Search Engine Journal. Source: https://www.searchenginejournal.com/feed/

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