Posts Tagged:plugins

rfp-robotRFP ROBOT: Website Request for Proposal Generator

The time has come for a new website (or website redesign), which means you need to write a website request for proposal or web RFP. A Google search produces a few examples, but they vary wildly and don’t seem to speak really to your goals for developing or redesigning a new website. You need to write a website RFP that will clearly articulate your needs and generate responses from the best website designers and developers out there. But how?

Have no fear, RFP Robot is here. He will walk you through a step-by-step process to help you work through the details of your project and create a PDF formatted website design RFP that will provide the information vendors need to write an accurate bid. RFP Robot will tell you what info you should include, point out pitfalls, and give examples.


The OSTraining Podcast #18: Nick Croft and the Genesis Framework

Nick Croft has just published the “Genesis Explained” book, which is a developers guide to the most popular theme framework in WordPress. Nick worked as a full-time support person for Genesis, before moving on to work as a developer on the framework. He later became a SaaS architect for the Rainmaker Platform, built on Genesis. Even before he literally wrote the book, he wrote the figurative book on Genesis. Nick is also a core contributor to Genesis and has multiple, popular Genesis plugins. Follow Nick on Twitter at @nick_thegeek and check out his personal site at NickGeek.com. [[ This is a content summary only. Visit http://OSTraining.com for full links, other content, and more! ]] Source: https://www.ostraining.com/

The OSTraining Podcast #18: Nick Croft and the Genesis Framework

Nick Croft has just published the “Genesis Explained” book, which is a developers guide to the most popular theme framework in WordPress. Nick worked as a full-time support person for Genesis, before moving on to work as a developer on the framework. He later became a SaaS architect for the Rainmaker Platform, built on Genesis. Even before he literally wrote the book, he wrote the figurative book on Genesis. Nick is also a core contributor to Genesis and has multiple, popular Genesis plugins. Follow Nick on Twitter at @nick_thegeek and check out his personal site at NickGeek.com. [[ This is a content summary only. Visit http://OSTraining.com for full links, other content, and more! ]] Source: https://www.ostraining.com/

5 Top WordPress Project Management Plugins

WordPress is the key technology tool for many companies. They use it for marketing, e-commerce, CRM and 1,001 other tasks. So, it’s not surprising that a lot of WordPress users also rely on it for project management. After all, if you allow customers to pay you on your WordPress site, or raise a support ticket there, why not also collaborate on projects using the same platform. In this overview, we’ll introduce you to 5 of the best WordPress project management plugins. All 5 have free versions available on WordPress.org. You can download them, test them, and see if they’re a good fit for you and your projects. [[ This is a content summary only. Visit http://OSTraining.com for full links, other content, and more! ]] Source: https://www.ostraining.com/

Review of the Best WordPress Checklist Plugins

If you really care about your WordPress content, you know that it’s a constant struggle to maintain high standards. It’s not easy to create consistent, high-quality posts. Without a careful approach, you’ll find your site has a different approach from post to post, and you’ll soon end up with lots of messy content. One solution is a checklist plugin. These plugins enable you to decide the requirement for each post before you publish. We downloaded and tested all the checklist plugins for WordPress. Here’s our review of all four checklist plugins … [[ This is a content summary only. Visit http://OSTraining.com for full links, other content, and more! ]] Source: https://www.ostraining.com/

WordPress User Survey Data for 2015-2017

A grand total of 77,609 responses from WordPress users and professionals collected by Automattic between 2015 and 2017. The stats for 2015 and 2016 have been shared at the annual State of the Word address and 2017 marks the first time they have been published on WordPress News. A few items that caught my attention at first glance: Between 66% and 75% of WordPress users installed WordPress on their own. In other words, they were savvy enough to do it without the help of a developer. Hosting providers were next up and clocked in at 13-14% of installs. WordPress professionals described their clients as large and enterprise companies only 6-7% of the time. I guess this makes sense if those companies are relying on in-house resourcing, but I still would have pegged this higher. What do users love most about WordPress? It’s simple and user-friendly (49-52%). What frustrates them most…

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Clean CSS with Stylelint

Last night I was working on the album functionality for this website. CSS is not my strong suit, so I wanted to get some help from a CSS linter. A CSS lint tool parses your CSS code and flags signs of inefficiency, stylistic inconsistencies, and patterns that may be erroneous. I tried Stylelint, an open source CSS linter written in JavaScript that is maintained as an npm package. It was quick and easy to install on my local development environment: $ npm install -g stylelint stylelint-config-standard stylelint-no-browser-hacks The -g attribute instructs npm to install the packages globally, the stylelint-config-standard is a standard configuration file (more about that in a second), and the stylelint-no-browser-hacks is an optional Stylelint plugin. Stylelint has over 150 rules to catch invalid CSS syntax, duplicates, etc. What is interesting about Stylelint is that it is completely un-opinionated; all the rules are disabled by default. Configuring all…

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Setting up WordPress Multisites Tutorial

Multisites allow you run multiple websites from just one WordPress installation. Each website can have different users, different themes and different plugins. This is possible because the old WPMU (WordPress Multi-User) project was merged into the main WordPress system. This is the same codebase that allows WordPress.com to run millions of sites, so you can be sure it works well. In order to set this up, you will need access to your files so that you can edit them. This tutorial will show you how. When you’ve finished, click here to read Part 2 of this tutorial: Managing WordPress Multisites [[ This is a content summary only. Visit http://OSTraining.com for full links, other content, and more! ]] Source: https://www.ostraining.com/

Accessibility Testing Tools

There is a sentiment that accessibility isn’t a checklist, meaning that if you’re really trying to make a site accessible, you don’t just get to check some things off a list and call it perfect. The list may be imperfect and worse, it takes the user out of the equation, so it is said. Karl Groves once argued against this: I’d argue that a well-documented process which includes checklist-based evaluations are better at ensuring that all users’ needs are met, not just some users. I mention this because you might consider an automated accessibility testing tool another form of a checklist. They have rules built into them, and they test your site against that list of rules. I’m pretty new to the idea of these things, so no expert here, but there appears to be quite a few options! Let’s take a look at some of them. aXe The Accessibility…

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Top 5 Text Editors for Designers Learning to Code

Okay, so you’ve decided it’s finally time to expand on your design expertise with some ninja coding skills. Congratulations! The good news is there are plenty of online resources to help you learn the basics and get your coding adventures off to a rolling start. Sooner or later, though, you’re going to have to fly solo and pen your own code. In fact, the sooner you do this, the better – because scribbling real code is by far the best way to learn, practise and improve. Which means, sooner or later, you’re going to need a good text editor – a program for typing unformatted text. This incredibly simple tool is the playground of all your coding escapades and modern text editors are a lot fancier than they used to be. Here are the top five text editors for designers learning to code. #1: Sublime Text ($70) Sublime Text calls itself “the text editor you’ll fall…

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CSS Code Smells

Every week(ish) we publish the newsletter which contains the best links, tips, and tricks about web design and development. At the end, we typically write about something we’ve learned in the week. That might not be directly related to CSS or front-end development at all, but they’re a lot of fun to share. Here’s an example of one those segments from the newsletter where I ramble on about code quality and dive into what I think should be considered a code smell when it comes to the CSS language. A lot of developers complain about CSS. The cascade! The weird property names! Vertical alignment! There are many strange things about the language, especially if you’re more familiar with a programming language like JavaScript or Ruby. However, I think the real problem with the CSS language is that it’s simple but not easy. What I mean by that is that it…

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10 Web Design Choices That Can Kill Your Clients’ Search Ranking

As a web designer, there’s no getting away from your responsibility to make design choices with SEO in mind. Your clients want their sites to rank well in search engines – there’s not much point in having one otherwise – and this means we sometimes have to make compromises. Compromise really is the key term, too. There’s no perfect way to design a website for search and your all your other priorities (user experience, conversions, etc.). You have to make the call on a number of design choices and come to the best overall result you can. Here are 10 design choices to avoid for the sake of your clients’ search ranking. Indexability killers The first thing to think about with search optimisation indexability and there are a number of potential issues you can come across as a designer. #1: One page, too much content Even basic apps like IFTTT and Pocket break…

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The OSTraining Podcast #12: Brian Hogg and Selling WordPress Plugins

In this week’s episode, I talk with Brian Hogg. Brian is a WordPress developer who writes plugins, but also creates super-helpful content for other developers. He launches new WordPress plugins and writes about his efforts to build a business around those plugins. Follow Brian on Twitter at @BrianHogg. You can also find his plugins, blog posts and training classes at BrianHogg.com. [[ This is a content summary only. Visit http://OSTraining.com for full links, other content, and more! ]] Source: https://www.ostraining.com/

6 WordPress Plugins That Will Speed up Your Site by @jonleeclark

Increase your speed and start optimizing traffic today when you download these WordPress plugins.The post 6 WordPress Plugins That Will Speed up Your Site by @jonleeclark appeared first on Search Engine Journal. Source: https://www.searchenginejournal.com/feed/

Google Analytics Metrics: How To Boost Return Visits to your Website

If you’ve been using Google Analytics for a while now, you’ve probably become acquainted with some of the popular features of this nifty web analytics tool. I love how it gives me an accurate picture of how popular my sites are, based on the number of visits and number of unique visitors. Data on Returning Visitors If you’re fairly new to Google Analytics – or if you’ve been monitoring the number of page visits only – then there’s a big chance that you’re missing out on an amazing set of data: returning visitors. To view this piece of data, log in to Google Analytics, then go to Audience > Behavior > New vs Returning. You should see a line graph of the total number of sessions per day, and a table of returning visitors and new visitors at the bottom of the page. Wondering what this particular Google Analytics data…

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Writing Smarter Animation Code

If you’ve ever coded an animation that’s longer than 10 seconds with dozens or even hundreds of choreographed elements, you know how challenging it can be to avoid the dreaded “wall of code”. Worse yet, editing an animation that was built by someone else (or even yourself 2 months ago) can be nightmarish. In these videos, I’ll show you the techniques that the pros use keep their code clean, manageable, and easy to revise. Scripted animation provides you the opportunity to create animations that are incredibly dynamic and flexible. My goal is for you to have fun without getting bogged down by the process. We’ll be using GSAP for all the animation. If you haven’t used it yet, you’ll quickly see why it’s so popular – the workflow benefits are substantial. See the Pen SVG Wars: May the morph be with you. (Craig Roblewsky) on CodePen. The demo above from…

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Gutenberg

I’ve only just been catching up with the news about Gutenberg, the name for a revamp of the WordPress editor. You can use it right now, as it’s being built as a plugin first, with the idea that eventually it goes into core. The repo has better information. It seems to me this is the most major change to the WordPress editor in WordPress history. It also seems particularly relevant here as we were just talking about content blocks and how different CMS’s handle them. That’s exactly what Gutenberg is: a content block editor. Rather than the content area being a glorified <textarea> (perhaps one of the most valid criticisms of WordPress), the content area becomes a wrapper for whatever different “blocks” you want to put there. Blocks are things like headings, text, lists, and images. They are also more elaborate things like galleries and embeds. Crucially, blocks are extensible…

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Create a One Page Drupal Site with Views Infinite Scroll Module

You most likely already navigated across some sites, blogs or galleries, that present the content in an infinite scroll mode. Such scrolling can easily be implemented with the Views Infinite Scroll contribution module in Drupal 8. No additional libraries or plugins required. In this tutorial, we’re going to create a gallery of article teasers of all countries in the Americas. Let’s get started! [[ This is a content summary only. Visit http://OSTraining.com for full links, other content, and more! ]] Source: https://www.ostraining.com/

The Modlet Workflow: Improve Your Development Workflow with StealJS

You’ve been convinced of the benefits the modlet workflow provides and you want to start building your components with their own test and demo pages. Whether you’re starting a new project or updating your current one, you need a module loader and bundler that doesn’t require build configuration for every test and demo page you want to make. StealJS is the answer. It can load JavaScript modules in any format (AMD, CJS, etc.) and load other file types (Less, TypeScript, etc.) with plugins. It requires minimum configuration and unlike webpack, it doesn’t require a build to load your dependencies in development. Last but not least, you can use StealJS with any JavaScript library or framework, including CanJS, React, Vue, etc. In this tutorial, we’re going to add StealJS to a project, create a component with Preact, create an interactive demo page, and create a test page. Article Series: The Key…

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Web Developer – Entry level Agency opportunity – Vertical Measures – Phoenix, AZ

Experience with WordPress &amp; Drupal platforms and plugins. What we need is an entry level web developer for our Conversion Rate Optimization team in Phoenix, AZ… $40,000 – $45,000 a yearFrom Indeed – Thu, 14 Sep 2017 21:43:19 GMT – View all Phoenix, AZ jobs Source: http://rss.indeed.com/rss?q=Drupal+Developer

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