Posts Tagged:navigation

rfp-robotRFP ROBOT: Website Request for Proposal Generator

The time has come for a new website (or website redesign), which means you need to write a website request for proposal or web RFP. A Google search produces a few examples, but they vary wildly and don’t seem to speak really to your goals for developing or redesigning a new website. You need to write a website RFP that will clearly articulate your needs and generate responses from the best website designers and developers out there. But how?

Have no fear, RFP Robot is here. He will walk you through a step-by-step process to help you work through the details of your project and create a PDF formatted website design RFP that will provide the information vendors need to write an accurate bid. RFP Robot will tell you what info you should include, point out pitfalls, and give examples.


Simple Server Side Rendering, Routing, and Page Transitions with Nuxt.js

A bit of a wordy title, huh? What is server side rendering? What does it have to do with routing and page transitions? What the heck is Nuxt.js? Funnily enough, even though it sounds complex, working with Nuxt.js and exploring the benefits of isn’t too difficult. Let’s get started! Server side rendering You might have heard people talking about server side rendering as of late. We looked at one method to do that with React recently. One particularly compelling aspect is the performance benefits. When we render our HTML, CSS, and JavaScript on the server, we often have less JavaScript to parse both initially and on subsequent updates. This article does really well going into more depth on the subject. My favorite takeaway is: By rendering on the server, you can cache the final shape of your data. Instead of grabbing JSON or other information from the server, parsing it,…

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The Options for Programmatically Documenting CSS

I strongly believe that the documentation should be kept as close to the code as possible. Based on my experience, that’s the only option that works well in the long term. External documents, notes, and wikis all eventually get outdated, forgotten, and lost. Documentation is a topic that always bugs me. Working on poorly documented codebase is a ticking bomb. It makes the onboarding process a tedious experience. Another way to think of bad documentation is that it helps foster a low truck factor (that is, “the number of people on your team who have to be hit by a truck before the project is in serious trouble”). Recently I was on-boarded into a project with more than 1,500 pages of documentation written in… Microsoft Word. It was outdated and unorganized. A real disaster. There must be a better way! I’ve talked about this documentation issue before. I scratched the…

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The Structure of an Elm Application

Most languages when they are in their infancy, tend to be considered “toy languages” and are only used for trivial or small projects. But this is not the case with Elm, where its true power shines in complex and large applications. It is not only possible to build some parts of an application in Elm and integrate those components into a larger JS application, but it is also possible to build the entire application without touching any other language making it an excellent alternative to JS frameworks like React. In this article, we will explore the structure of an Elm application using a simple site to manage plain-text documents as an example. Article Series: Why Elm? (And How To Get Started With It) Introduction to The Elm Architecture and How to Build our First Application The Structure of an Elm Application (You are here!) Some of the topics covered in…

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An Introduction to the `fr` CSS unit

With all the excitement around CSS Grid, I haven’t seen as much talk about the new fr CSS length unit (here’s the spec). And now that browser support is rapidly improving for this feature, I think this is the time to explore how it can be used in conjunction with our fancy new layout engine because there are a number of benefits when using it; more legible and maintainable code being the primary reasons for making the switch. To get started, let’s take a look at how we’d typically think of building a grid in CSS. In the example below, we’re creating a four column grid where each column has an equal width: <div class=”grid”> <div class=”column”></div> <div class=”column”></div> <div class=”column”></div> <div class=”column”></div> </div> .grid { display: grid; grid-template-columns: repeat(4, 25%); grid-column-gap: 10px; } See the Pen CSS-Tricks: Grid Example 1 by Robin Rendle (@robinrendle) on CodePen. If you’ve never…

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Bringing Research Home

Any designer who has created a personal portfolio site knows that your toughest client is always yourself. Recently, we have felt particularly sympathetic to the plight of designing for yourself because we have been taking an introspective look at our own site and messaging. We wanted to understand how potential clients perceive and evaluate Viget in their search for an agency partner and the role that our website plays in shaping that impression. We wanted to see our brand and our site through the lens of a potential client, a person getting a first introduction to Viget. To do that, we applied the same research methods we employ for client projects to our own questions. Creating a Setting for Direct Feedback Having conversations with prospective and current clients is something we do all the time. Typically though, those conversations are initiated by the business development team or account managers, people who are heavily involved in…

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Build a Style Guide Straight from Sass

Last fall, our dev team wanted to get started with style guides. We had added a new member to the team, and as he was getting up to speed, we realized how lacking our project documentation was. If you’ve ever been a new developer on a team with weak documentation, you know how confusing it can be to try to familiarize yourself with a dozen projects without documentation. In deciding on a style guide method, we came up with two main requirements: Low Friction The style guide should be easy to find, easy to read, and easy to maintain. Something that fit into our existing development workflow would be awesome. Adding new directories for sample markup and documentation files would not be awesome. Platform Agnostic We work in WordPress, Drupal, and CakePHP most often, and we wanted something that would work the same way across all three platforms. We wanted…

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Build a Style Guide Straight from Sass

Last fall, our dev team wanted to get started with style guides. We had added a new member to the team, and as he was getting up to speed, we realized how lacking our project documentation was. If you’ve ever been a new developer on a team with weak documentation, you know how confusing it can be to try to familiarize yourself with a dozen projects without documentation. In deciding on a style guide method, we came up with two main requirements: Low Friction The style guide should be easy to find, easy to read, and easy to maintain. Something that fit into our existing development workflow would be awesome. Adding new directories for sample markup and documentation files would not be awesome. Platform Agnostic We work in WordPress, Drupal, and CakePHP most often, and we wanted something that would work the same way across all three platforms. We wanted…

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Managing State in CSS with Reusable JavaScript Functions – Part 2

In my previous article, which shall now retroactively be known as Managing State in CSS with Reusable JavaScript Functions – Part 1, we created a powerful reusable function which allows us to quickly add, remove and toggle stateful classes via click. One of the reasons I wanted to share this approach was to see what kind of response it would generate. Since then I’ve received some interesting feedback from other developers, with some raising valid shortcomings about this approach that would have never otherwise occurred to me. In this article, I’ll be providing some solutions to these shortcomings, as well as baking in more features and general improvements to make our reusable function even more powerful. Article Series: Original article Managing State in CSS with Reusable JavaScript Functions (You are here!) For reference, here’s the JavaScript from Part 1 for our reusable function as it stands: // Grab all elements…

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Can Navigation Location Hurt Your SEO? #AskanSEO by @jennyhalasz

Can the location of your website navigation negatively impact SEO performance? Find out in the latest Ask an SEO.The post Can Navigation Location Hurt Your SEO? #AskanSEO by @jennyhalasz appeared first on Search Engine Journal. Source: https://www.searchenginejournal.com/feed/

Bringing Analytical Thinking to Product Decisions with Client Teams

What is decision-making? In its simplest form, decision-making is the act of choosing between two or more courses of action. When confronted with a decision, you can take one of two cognitive approaches – analytical or intuitive. In Thinking Fast, and Slow, Nobel prize winner cognitive psychologist Daniel Kahneman describes analytical thinking as “slow, deliberate, and consciously effortful mode of reasoning.” By contrast, intuitive thinking is our “fast, automatic, and largely unconscious mode.” In other words: think, or blink.   There are hundreds of non-trivial decisions that come up in our day-to-day work building brands and creating great web products here at Viget. Which typeface combination best conveys a campaign’s tone? What mobile nav style will work best for users in an older demographic? How should I structure the code for this feature? Our professional lives can be simplified down to making and acting on decisions like these. When we…

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User Facing State

Let’s talk about state. Communicating state to the user that is, not application stores state in JavaScript objects, or localStorage. We’re going to be talking about how to let our users know about state (think: whether a button is disabled or not, or if a panel is active or not), and how we can use CSS for that. We’re not going to be using inline styles, or, as much as can be helped, class selectors, for reasons that will become clear as we go. Still here? Cool. Let’s do this. All dynamic components of an application have a default user-facing state, and that state needs to be stored and updated as users interact with these components. For example, when a button is pressed, things happen (that’s what buttons are for). When these things happen, they are typically represented in a visual manner in the interface. The button’s background may change…

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Websites We Like: May 2017

It’s been far too long since we rounded up some of the most interesting websites out there. But this time we have a diverse round-up of whacky interfaces and beautiful layouts to look at. Let’s dive straight in! Nick Jones’ Portfolio The portfolio of Nick Jones is one of the neatest personal websites I’ve ever seen. As you flip through each page and project that Nick has worked on, the interface rotates and zooms in as you get closer to the end. Not only that but the interface changes color and the tiny animation on the title of each post draws your eye to it. In fact, I think this is the first time I’ve felt comfortable with a designer changing the basic paradigm of mouse scrolling – it somehow feels fluent and natural rather than janky and weird. Hey, they always tell us the cheapest things to animate are…

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5 Useful Tips when Designing for Users Short Attention Spans

Recent research shows that the average attention span of an internet user is 8 seconds. This is why designing for users short attention spans is crucial. Failure to do this, will ensure users won’t stick around a particular website long enough to accomplish a given task, whether it is buying something or simply reading articles. So, what can web designers do about this? There are several ways you can optimize a website to appeal to users with a short attention span. 1. Fast Loading Speed First and foremost, ensure that the website loads as fast as possible. In this situation, time is critical. The longer it takes for a website to load, the more the user becomes impatient. You can be sure that they won’t stick around to wait for it to fully load. One of the ways to improve website speed is by removing any unnecessary features. This includes images, text,…

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Mobile, Small, Portrait, Slow, Interlace, Monochrome, Coarse, Non-Hover, First

A month ago I explored the importance of relying on Interaction Media Features to identify the user’s ability to hover over elements or to detect the accuracy of their pointing device, meaning a fine pointer like a mouse or a coarse one like a finger. But it goes beyond the input devices or the ability to hover; the screen refresh rate, the color of the screen, or the orientation. Making assumptions about these factors based on the width of the viewport is not reliable and can lead to a broken interface. I’ll take you on a journey through the land of Media Query Level 4 and explore the opportunities that the W3C CSS WG has drafted to help us deal with all the device fruit salad madness. Media queries Media queries, in a nutshell, inform us about the context in which our content is being displayed, allowing us to scope…

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How to Create the Standard Bootstrap Navbar Button for Mobile Devices

Bootstrap is an HTML, CSS and JavaScript framework. Using it, you can easily build mobile-first responsive websites. It offers you plenty of pre-set CSS styling for web elements, including navigation bars. In this tutorial, you will learn how to easily create a basic Bootstrap responsive navbar. Then you’ll learn how to use a Bootstrap Standard Navbar Button for mobile devices. [[ This is a content summary only. Visit http://OSTraining.com for full links, other content, and more! ]] Source: https://www.ostraining.com/

Breadcrumb Navigation & its Usefulness

While navigating through websites, breadcrumbs are one way to ensure that you (or your users) can browse and explore easily. Breadcrumbs, or breadcrumb navigation links, are a set of hyperlinks that function as an extra navigation feature for websites. Breadcrumbs positively effect usability by minimizing the number of actions a website user needs to take to get into high-level pages, which enhances ease of navigation. They also provide indication as to the exact location of the visitor within the website’s hierarchy, providing context and, essentially, a virtual mini map of the site.  What are Breadcrumbs? A “breadcrumb” is a kind of alternate navigation method which helps to reveal the visitor’s location within a website or Web app. We often find breadcrumbs on websites that have an extensive catalogue of information organized in a hierarchical manner. We can also see breadcrumbs in Web apps that have a vast quantity of content,…

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When Does a Project Need React?

You know when a project needs HTML and CSS, because it’s all of them. When you reach for JavaScript is fairly clear: when you need interactivity or some functionality that only JavaScript can provide. It used to be fairly clear when we reached for libraries. We reached for jQuery to help us simplify working with the DOM, Ajax, and handle cross-browser issues with JavaScript. We reached for underscore to give us helper functions that the JavaScript alone didn’t have. As the need for these libraries fades, and we see a massive rise in new frameworks, I’d argue it’s not as clear when to reach for them. At what point do we need React? I’m just going to use React as a placeholder here for kinda large JavaScript framework thingies. Vue, Ember, Svelte… whatever. I understand they aren’t all the same, but when to reach for them I find equally nebulous.…

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SCORE.org: User Experience for 320+ Sites On One Flexible Platform

SCORE.org is helping Americans start and grow small businesses with their free, confidential business advice. In order to have maximum reach and impact, SCORE teamed up with Phase2 to create a Drupal system that is flexible enough to accommodate 320+ local chapter sites that support their own content production, without eschewing overall brand and design standard of the national site. Next week at DrupalCon in Baltimore, MD, I will be taking the stage with SCORE’s Director of Marketing, Candice Stennett, to speak on the success of this build and partnership. In the meantime, I sat down with Candice to get her perspective on the project from a marketing standpoint.  Q. Can you tell me a little bit about SCORE’s previous platform organization and functions and the challenges that led you to needing a redesign? A. SCORE is a nonprofit organization dedicated to the formation and growth of small businesses in…

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How to Improve Your Website Navigation: 7 Essential Best Practices by @benjarriola

Use these website navigation best practices to help your users and search engines more easily find your content.The post How to Improve Your Website Navigation: 7 Essential Best Practices by @benjarriola appeared first on Search Engine Journal. Source: https://www.searchenginejournal.com/feed/

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