Posts Tagged:Microsite

rfp-robotRFP ROBOT: Website Request for Proposal Generator

The time has come for a new website (or website redesign), which means you need to write a website request for proposal or web RFP. A Google search produces a few examples, but they vary wildly and don’t seem to speak really to your goals for developing or redesigning a new website. You need to write a website RFP that will clearly articulate your needs and generate responses from the best website designers and developers out there. But how?

Have no fear, RFP Robot is here. He will walk you through a step-by-step process to help you work through the details of your project and create a PDF formatted website design RFP that will provide the information vendors need to write an accurate bid. RFP Robot will tell you what info you should include, point out pitfalls, and give examples.


Pixeldust Wins Trio of Addy Awards

Pixeldust and Nice Monster won three bronze awards in the 2009 Austin ADDYs for creative work on the Nice Monster website.

International Johnson Controls Website Launches

Pixeldust has announced the launch of the 2008 Business and Sustainability Report site for Johnson Controls. Utilizing Drupal, Pixeldust launched the site in 12 languages and created a custom PDF generator for each language. Users can build and download their own custom 2008 Business and Sustainability Report as well as view the custom Flash Map in each language. Pixeldust collaborated with partner Really Really Big Industries, Inc. of Chicago to develop the site in under six weeks.

Interactive Introduction to CSS Houdini

This is a great explanatory microsite by Sam Richard. CSS Houdini will let authors tap in to the actual CSS engine, finally allowing us to extend CSS, and do so at CSS speeds. Much like Service Workers are a low-level JavaScript API for the browser’s cache, Houdini introduces low-level JavaScript APIs for the browser’s render engines. What’s important to know is that Houdini is broken up into these different parts, each of which will be implemented separately. We have an intro to the paint API here and a number of other articles that touch on it. Here’s a very cool collection Dan Wilson put together of Houdini + Custom Properties. Direct Link to Article — PermalinkThe post Interactive Introduction to CSS Houdini appeared first on CSS-Tricks. Source: CssTricks

VS Code Can Do That?

Clever microsite from Burke Holland and Sarah Drasner that highlights some of VS Code’s coolest features. All fifteen of them are pretty darn cool. Here’s a few other compelling features I’ve seen people use/love: There is a terminal right in there, so you don’t need a separate app. The GitLens add-on, which shows you who last updated any line of code in your codebase, and when. Vim nerds aren’t left out. Live Share is coming soon. Solis looks like a pretty cool add-on for live previews. Type checking Personally, I’m still on Sublime. I gave VS Code the college try last year but failed. I can’t even remember why now, which means it’s probably about time to try again. If it was slowness, maybe it was because I was using too many add-ons. Direct Link to Article — PermalinkThe post VS Code Can Do That? appeared first on CSS-Tricks. Source:…

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Microsites for Case Studies

A lot of y’all have personal sites. Personal sites with portfolios. Or you work for or own an agency where showing off the work you do is arguably even more important. Often the portfolio area of a site is the most fretted and hard to pull off. Do you link to the live projects? Screenshots? How many? How much do you say? How much of the process do people care about? I’m afraid I don’t have all the answers for you. I don’t really do much freelance, work for an agency, or have a need to present work I’ve done in this way. But! I tweeted this the other day: Idea. Build your case studies as microsites. Then they can just live alone and don’t have to be a drag when redesigning your site. If the microsite gets old and stogy, the project you’re talking about probably has too. —…

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CSS-Tricks Chronicle XXXIII

It’s been many months since our last CSS-Tricks Chronicle. As a reminder, these are just little roundups of news of a slightly more personal nature and that of the site itself and surrounding projects. Last update, I wasn’t even a dad yet! That’s changed 😍. My daughter is going in for her four-month checkup today! I’m also working out of a brand new office here in Bend, Oregon. We split the space with CraftCMS. It’s the first time I’ve had an office that I have real (part) ownership over. We’ve built out a kitchen area in it and are decorating it and fleshing it out to be useful and fun for all of us. One particularly cool thing, we splurged on a VocalBooth. It’s got the whole medium-fancy podcasting setup in there, so it’s pretty darn good sound quality for the podcasting we do. Plus it’s a nice place to…

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How to Seamlessly Merge a Microsite for Improved Rankings [Case Study] by @KatyaBovykina

If you manage a microsite, you can merge it with your main site to gain rankings and organic traffic. Just follow these step-by-step instructions.The post How to Seamlessly Merge a Microsite for Improved Rankings [Case Study] by @KatyaBovykina appeared first on Search Engine Journal. Source: https://www.searchenginejournal.com/feed/

Carousels Don’t Have to be Complicated

Over on the MediaTemple blog, I show you how you can make a pretty decent little carousel with just a few lines of code. Here’s the entire premise: Every time a carousel is mentioned in a blog post, it’s a requirement to mention that… say it with me now: You probably shouldn’t use a carousel. Jared Smith made a microsite just for it, with research and rhetoric supporting the idea that you shouldn’t use them. Most of that information focuses on the fact that there is low engagement with the non-first-slide(s). I’m not here to argue with data, but I would argue with the dogmatism of “never user them, EVER.” Swiping on mobile is an extremely common action, and what is a swipe that reveals more content? Basically a carousel. What about a carousel that doesn’t demand much interaction? Perhaps just a way to swipe through an artist’s recent work.…

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You Might Not Need JavaScript

A whole bunch of examples by Una Kravets of actually-functional things you might think of as needing JavaScript but can be done in HTML and CSS alone. You might of expect a bunch of “Checkbox Hack” stuff (and that’s in there), but it’s quite a wide range of techniques. I like this style of microsite, in the vein of You Might Not Need jQuery (or plugins) or You Might Not Need Underscore. When you see things like this all together, it does kinda make you think… wouldn’t it be nice to have some kind of arbitrary state management in CSS? Direct Link to Article — Permalink You Might Not Need JavaScript is a post from CSS-Tricks Source: CssTricks

Gatti’s Jingle Site Wins Silver at Regional ADDYs

Pixeldust is pleased to announce our Gatti’s Jingle Microsite won a silver award in the Micro/Mini-sites category at the Regional American Ad Federation Awards (ADDY Awards).

“Drink. Drive. Go to Jail.” Microsite Launches

Pixeldust and Nice Monster, along with Sherry Matthews Advocacy Marketing, launched a new website for the Texas Department of Transportation’s “Drink. Drive. Go to Jail.” Labor Day campaign. The Flash-based website features a video gallery of real drunk driving arrests and information about DWI consequences. Pixeldust also built a series of rich media Flash banners that also feature the “Drink. Drive. Go to Jail.” slogan. The website and banners are part of the Texas Department of Transportation’s effort to let drivers know they will be out in full force over Labor Day weekend and not to drive drunk.

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