Posts Tagged:Mac

rfp-robotRFP ROBOT: Website Request for Proposal Generator

The time has come for a new website (or website redesign), which means you need to write a website request for proposal or web RFP. A Google search produces a few examples, but they vary wildly and don’t seem to speak really to your goals for developing or redesigning a new website. You need to write a website RFP that will clearly articulate your needs and generate responses from the best website designers and developers out there. But how?

Have no fear, RFP Robot is here. He will walk you through a step-by-step process to help you work through the details of your project and create a PDF formatted website design RFP that will provide the information vendors need to write an accurate bid. RFP Robot will tell you what info you should include, point out pitfalls, and give examples.


Creating a VS Code Theme

Everyone has special and perhaps, particular, tastes when it comes to their code editor. There are literally thousands of themes out there, and for good reason: a thing of beauty and enhancement to productivity for one can be a hindrance to another. It’s been an item on my bucket list to create my own theme. I was coding very late the one night, well into the small hours of the morning. Everyone in my house was sleeping and so, as usual, the only light was the glow of my screen. I know it’s not necessarily healthy to code like this, but it’s literally the time I’m most productive: there are minimal distractions, I’m not dealing with work stuff, family stuff, friend stuff, or puppy stuff. I can focus. I had some preferences set for the theme I had been using and, though they all worked well for daytime or plane…

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Bing Ads Editor for Mac Adds Support for Labels by @MattGSouthern

Bing Ads Editor for Mac has added support for labels, allowing users to better organize ad campaigns and save time.The post Bing Ads Editor for Mac Adds Support for Labels by @MattGSouthern appeared first on Search Engine Journal. Source: https://www.searchenginejournal.com/feed/

Learning Gutenberg: Series Introduction

Hey CSS-Tricksters! 👋 We have a special long-form series we’re kicking off here totally dedicated to Gutenberg, a major change to the WordPress editor. I’ve invited a dynamic duo of authors to bring you this series, which will bring you up to speed on what Gutenberg is, what it can do for your site, and how you can actually develop for it. Who this is for This series is more for developers who are curious about this new world and wanna get started working with it. This series isn’t necessarily for site owners who want to know how it’s going to affect their site or who are worried about it for any reason. It’s clear there is a lot of possibility with Gutenberg. Yes, it’s aiming to be a better editing experience, but it also likely to change how people think of what’s possible with WordPress. With the custom “blocks”…

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Turn Sublime Text 3 into a JavaScript IDE

Sublime Text is one of the most popular editors for web development and software development in general. It’s very smooth and fast compared to other editors (being written in C++ helps that speed). Sublime also has tons of plugins you can find through Package Control. But it’s only a text editor and not an IDE. An IDE is a software application that provides comprehensive facilities to computer programmers for software development. In fact, Sublime doesn’t offer features like debugging tools, built-in tools for compiling and running applications, intelligent code suggestions, or code refactoring. Instead it offers a set of APIs you can use to extend it. Here’s an introduction to the JavaScript Enhancement plugin (my own creation) that makes Sublime a bit more IDE-like for JavaScript development. What is the JavaScript Enhancement Plugin? It is a plugin for Sublime Text 3 that offers a lot of features useful for creating,…

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How Does Free Graphic Design Software Stack Up?

Graphic design is an easy kind of business to manage, but a difficult one to get started in. Until you have built up a decent number of regular clients, you may find you must watch every penny closely. If you are in this situation, the prices of popular graphic design software will be quite a shock. One of the true luxuries of running your own graphic design studio, however, is that you’re not locked in to using any particular software as you would probably be if you were an employee of somebody else. That means you’re at liberty to use whatever helps you get the job done efficiently. The idea of free graphic design software may sound exciting, but is it really up to the task? Will it allow you to create professional quality work without the high cost? Let’s find out. 1. PhotoShop vs GIMP  GIMP default interface GIMP…

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Fast Follower

I love this simple list of “fast follower” companies that eventually became the market leaders in their respective space(s): Microsoft. Bought 86-DOS, turned into MS-DOS (which Gates did not invent), which in turn was an improved clone of CP/M. Did not invent BASIC, either. Office in many ways built in part on top of Lotus 1–2–3’s success. Windows after/alongside Mac OS. Etc. etc. etc. Facebook. MySpace, Friendster, whatever. Google. Yahoo, Altavista, whatever. Salesforce. Maybe not a fast follower, but already Siebel Sales.com, etc. Apple. Copied Xerox, Altair, everything. Square. Very innovative, but a mobile PayPal, etc. Marketo, Hubspot, More. Neither invented the space. Slack. Very innovative, especially in integrations. But we had so many point solutions before, and since. One of the beautiful things about working in newer and more nascent markets, such as bitcoin and blockchain, is that there isn’t a clear winner at the moment and there won’t be a…

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How to Easily Screen Capture and Edit Videos on Your Computer

If you’re trying to capture parts of your screen and edit those captures, you have several ways to do so. For instance, Windows and Mac come with the functionality to take your own screenshots, but there are few options for video capture, and even the screenshot tools are pretty watered down. So, if you’re making a tutorial, or you would like to capture something like a video or webinar on your computer, it can all be done by using the right tools and learning how to use them. So, for those looking for one of the most efficient ways to get screen captures and edit those videos, keep reading to learn more. Step 1: Get the Right Tools A favorite of mine is Movavi, since it provides options for screen capture and editing in one package. So, for this tutorial, you can download the Movavi Mac Recorder, or the Windows…

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Three Techniques for Performant Custom Font Usage

There’s a lot of good news in the world of web fonts! The forthcoming version of Microsoft Edge will finally implement unicode-range, the last modern browser to do so. Preload and font-display are landing in Safari and Firefox. Variable fonts are shipping everywhere. Using custom fonts in a performant way is becoming far easier. Let’s take a peek at some things we can do when using custom fonts to make sure we’re being as performant as we can be. 1) Reduce the File Size Far from containing only numbers, the Latin alphabet and common punctuation, many fonts support multiple languages and include thousands of additional glyphs, adding significantly to the file size. The Mac tool Font Book can display all the available glyphs in a font. In these cases, subsetting is useful. Subsetting is the removal of characters you don’t need. You can do this using the command line tool…

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Twitter Will Stop Supporting its Mac App in March 2018 by @MattGSouthern

Twitter will soon drop support for its Twitter for Mac desktop app, suggesting Mac users should use the web client.The post Twitter Will Stop Supporting its Mac App in March 2018 by @MattGSouthern appeared first on Search Engine Journal. Source: https://www.searchenginejournal.com/feed/

The JavaScript Learning Landscape in 2018

Raise your hand if this sounds like you: You’ve been in the tech industry for a number of years, you know HTML and CSS inside-and-out, and you make a good living. But, you have a little voice in the back of your head that keeps whispering, “It’s time for something new, for the next step in your career. You need to learn programming.” Yep, same here. I’ve served in a variety of roles in the tech industry for close to a decade. I’ve written a bunch of articles on design, coding, HTML, and CSS. Hell, I’ve even written a few books and spoken at conferences around the world. But there’s still that voice that keeps telling me I need to tackle programming; that I’ll never be fulfilled until I learn how to develop my own ideas and projects from scratch. Being a web guy, the obvious language to learn: JavaScript.…

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CSS Basics: The Second “S” in CSS

CSS is an abbreviation for Cascading Style Sheets. While most of the discussion about CSS on the web (or even here on CSS-Tricks) is centered around writing styles and how the cascade affects them, what we don’t talk a whole lot about is the sheet part of the language. So let’s give that lonely second “S” a little bit of the spotlight and understand what we mean when we say CSS is a style sheet. The Sheet Contains the Styles The cascade describes how styles interact with one another. The styles make up the actual code. Then there’s the sheet that contains that code. Like a sheet of paper that we write on, the “sheet” of CSS is the digital file where styles are coded. If we were to illustrate this, the relationship between the three sort of forms a cascade: The sheet holds the styles. There can be multiple…

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Creating Cue Files from Markdown

Pretty specific, huh? While we’re going to do exactly what the title says, this post is more about a learning exercise and an example of getting help on the internet. My podcast editor, Chris Enns, is always looking for ways to improve his work and make podcasting better. One kinda cool way to do that is to offer “chapters” so that people can jump around in a podcast to specific points. Through TimeJump, we already offer that on the website itself. Those happen in the format of hash links like this: #t=12:18. Believe it or not, relative links like that, in the show notes, actually work in some podcatchers (podcast listening apps). Jumping around an audio element with the TimeJump JavaScript library. But using “chapters” is, I suppose, the more correct way of handling this. With chapters, a podcatcher can offer its own native UI for displaying and allowing the…

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Creating a Decoupled Drupal Application in 30 Minutes with Lightning, BLT, and DrupalVM

Overview Brian Reese, Jason Enter, and Dane Powell, members of Acquia’s Professional Services team, recently released an open-source application that demonstrates how Drupal and Node.js can easily be paired to create beautiful and functional decoupled applications. This demo application was split into two repositories: a Drupal-based backend (acting as a data provider) and the Node-based frontend. You can find a tutorial on how to try out this demo application yourself here, or follow the READMEs included in each repo. The purpose of the current tutorial, however, is to illustrate how easy it was to create the Drupal backend using a combination of Acquia and Drupal community projects such as Lightning, BLT, and DrupalVM. This will allow you to follow the same process to rapidly create your own custom decoupled applications. Understanding the components Let’s start by briefly reviewing the open-source (read: free!) tools you will use in this tutorial. Lightning…

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Apps Have Command Prompts Now

Command lines were an early innovation in computers, and were the dominant way to interact with them in the 1960’s – 80’s. That gave way to GUIs for most users after that. I don’t think we need to launch a scientific study to figure out why. Most users find it more comfortable and intuitive to accomplish things with interactive moments and visual feedback. But command lines never went away. GUI’s are generally a limited abstraction of what you could do through a command line anyway, so power users gravitate toward the closer-to-the-metal nature of the command line. But we might be in the middle of a return to a happy medium. Finder-ing We know Apple is quite fond of cutting features. Particularly little-used features or power-user-only features. Curiously, this one has stuck around: The “Go To Folder” dialog, via Command-Shift-G William Pearson wrote: If there’s only one keyboard shortcut you…

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SVG as a Placeholder

It wasn’t long ago when Mikael Ainalem’s Pen demonstrated how you might use SVG outlines in HTML then lazyload the image (later turned into a webpack loader by Emil Tholin). It’s kind of like a skeleton screen, in that it gives the user a hint of what’s coming. Or the blur up technique, which loads a very small image blurrily blown up as the placeholder image. José M. Pérez documents those, plus some more basic options (nothing, an image placeholder, or a solid color), and best of all, a very clever new idea using Primitive (of which there is a mac app and JavaScript version), which creates overlapping SVG shapes to use as the placeholder image. Probably a bit bigger-in-size than some of the other techniques, but still much smaller than a high res JPG! Direct Link to Article — Permalink SVG as a Placeholder is a post from CSS-Tricks …

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New in Basecamp 3: To-do Groups

A little thing that’s a big deal.For years, we’ve been making to-do lists in Basecamp that looked like this:See those === DIVIDERS ===? We were trying to group related to-dos together within a list. All we wanted was to bring a little structure, and an extra ounce of organization, to a single flat list.We weren’t alone. Whenever a customer showed us how they use Basecamp, we’d inevitably run into a similar === DIVIDER === pattern. They were trying to do what we were trying to do.We were all hacking it. As of today, the silliness is over. No hacks required!We just launched To-do Groups in Basecamp 3!What’s a group?A group is like a sublist on a list. It’s organization, it’s structure, it’s an envelope, it’s a box. It has a header, and to-dos grouped below.The anatomy of a Basecamp 3 to-do list with two groupsWhen you drag a group header, all the to-dos under that header move with…

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Manage and Protect Your Apple Devices

(This is a sponsored post.)Jamf Now is a mobile device management solution for the iPad, iPhone, and Mac devices at work. We make management tasks like deploying Wi-Fi passwords, setting up email accounts, securing company data, and enforcing passcodes, simple and affordable, so businesses can support their users. No IT required. CSS-Tricks readers can manage their first 3 devices for free, forever! Sign up today to create your free account! Direct Link to Article — Permalink Manage and Protect Your Apple Devices is a post from CSS-Tricks Source: CssTricks

Getting Around a Revoked Certificate in OSX

Let me start this off by saying this is not an ideal trick and one I hope no one else needs to use because it’s a bad idea to work around a browser feature that’s aimed to protect your security. That said, I am in the process of testing a product and ran into a weird situation where our team had to revoke the SSL certificate we had assigned to our server. We’re going to replace it but I have testing to do in the meantime and need access to our staging server, so waiting is kind of a blocker because, well, this message gets me nowhere. Safari’s warning for a site with a revoked certificate. This message is different from the warnings browsers provide for sites without SSL. Those give you a built-in workaround by simply dismissing the warning. The difference is that a revoked certificate implies that the…

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A Look Back at the History of CSS

When you think of HTML and CSS, you probably imagine them as a package deal. But for years after Tim Berners-Lee first created the World Wide Web in 1989, there was no such thing as CSS. The original plan for the web offered no way to style a website at all. There’s a now-infamous post buried in the archives of the WWW mailing list. It was written by Marc Andreessen in 1994, who would go on to co-create both the Mosaic and Netscape browsers. In the post, Andreessen remarked that because there was no way to style a website with HTML, the only thing he could tell web developers when asked about visual design was, “sorry you’re screwed.” 10 years later, CSS was on its way to full adoption by a newly enthused web community. *W**hat happened along the way?* Finding a Styling Language There were plenty of ideas for…

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