Posts Tagged:jquery

rfp-robotRFP ROBOT: Website Request for Proposal Generator

The time has come for a new website (or website redesign), which means you need to write a website request for proposal or web RFP. A Google search produces a few examples, but they vary wildly and don’t seem to speak really to your goals for developing or redesigning a new website. You need to write a website RFP that will clearly articulate your needs and generate responses from the best website designers and developers out there. But how?

Have no fear, RFP Robot is here. He will walk you through a step-by-step process to help you work through the details of your project and create a PDF formatted website design RFP that will provide the information vendors need to write an accurate bid. RFP Robot will tell you what info you should include, point out pitfalls, and give examples.


Dropdown Menus in Drupal 8 with the Superfish Module

If you want to build a large, multi-level drop-down menu in Drupal 8, then the Superfish module is a great choice. The Superfish module makes use of the jQuery Superfish menu plugin, which is useful for multi-level drop-down menus. Superfish has more features than most dropdown menus. It supports touch devices and keyboard interaction. [[ This is a content summary only. Visit http://OSTraining.com for full links, other content, and more! ]] Source: https://www.ostraining.com/

How to Create a Custom jQuery Plugin

jQuery is, in my humble opinion, the best Javascript library. Much of jQuery’s popularity is due to the fact that it considerably reduces development time. Their slogan is “write less, do more”, which is a great summary of jQuery’s benefits. What make jQuery really great are the plugins. Plugins are reusable portions of code which help you write even less Javascript to achieve specific features on the client side. For example, you can use plugins to create slideshows, galleries, popups and more. In this tutorial, you will learn how to create your own custom jQuery plugin in 4 easy steps. Let’s start… [[ This is a content summary only. Visit http://OSTraining.com for full links, other content, and more! ]] Source: https://www.ostraining.com/

Web Developer, Front-End – George Washington University – Foggy Bottom, MD

Drupal 7 experience (required). Experience building responsive websites using Drupal CMS , HTML /HTML5, CSS /CSS3, and JavaScript/jQuery….From George Washington University – Mon, 21 Aug 2017 16:25:18 GMT – View all Foggy Bottom, MD jobs Source: http://rss.indeed.com/rss?q=Drupal+Developer

Improving Conversations using the Perspective API

I recently came across an article by Rory Cellan-Jones about a new technology from Jigsaw, a development group at Google focused on making people safer online through technology. At the time they’d just released the first alpha version of what they call The Perspective API. It’s a machine learning tool that is designed to rate a string of text (i.e. a comment) and provide you with a Toxicity Score, a number representing how toxic the text is. The system learns by seeing how thousands of online conversations have been moderated and then scores new comments by assessing how “toxic” they are and whether similar language had led other people to leave conversations. What it’s doing is trying to improve the quality of debate and make sure people aren’t put off from joining in. As the project is still in its infancy it doesn’t do much more than that. Still, we…

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Making Better HTML Tables

Inspired Magazine Inspired Magazine – creativity & inspiration daily Strangely enough, one of the most difficult web technologies to master is one of the earliest ones to be available for the browser after plain text and images. The problem is even greater today with so many different device types that need to be thought about. Perfect tables are nearly impossible to create unless they contain so few items that no problems are likely to be triggered. The kinds of errors that can arise include: Text wrapping incorrectly Justification errors Table rendering off screen Scroll problems Row height errors Column width errors General ugliness or untidiness In this article we’ll take a look at how to avoid problems like that, so your tables have the best chance of creating a good impression. Avoidance strategies to avoid Because tables are so difficult to get right, some people try to avoid using them.…

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More Gotchas Getting Inline SVG Into Production—Part II

The following is a guest post by Rob Levin and Chris Rumble. Rob and Chris both work on the product design team at Mavenlink. Rob is also creator and host of the SVG Immersion Podcast and wrote the original 5 Gotchas article back in ’14. Chris, is a UI and Motion Designer/Developer based out of San Francisco. In this article, they go over some additional issues they encountered after incorporating inline SVGs in to Mavenlink’s flagship application more then 2 years ago. The article illustrations were done by Rob and—in the spirit of our topic—are 100% vector SVGs! Wow, it’s been over 2 years since we posted the 5 Gotchas Getting SVG Into Production article. Well, we’ve encountered some new gotchas making it time for another follow up post! We’ll label these 6-10 paying homage to the first 5 gotchas in the original post 🙂 Gotcha Six: IE Drag &…

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Musings on HTTP/2 and Bundling

HTTP/2 has been one of my areas of interest. In fact, I’ve written a few articles about it just in the last year. In one of those articles I made this unchecked assertion: If the user is on HTTP/2: You’ll serve more and smaller assets. You’ll avoid stuff like image sprites, inlined CSS, and scripts, and concatenated style sheets and scripts. I wasn’t the only one to say this, though, in all fairness to Rachel, she qualifies her assertion with caveats in her article. To be fair, it’s not bad advice in theory. HTTP/2’s multiplexing ability gives us leeway to avoid bundling without suffering the ill effects of head-of-line blocking (something we’re painfully familiar with in HTTP/1 environments). Unraveling some of these HTTP/1-specific optimizations can make development easier, too. In a time when web development seems more complicated than ever, who wouldn’t appreciate a little more simplicity? As with anything…

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(Now More Than Ever) You Might Not Need jQuery

The DOM and native browser API’s have improved by leaps and bounds since jQuery’s release all the way back in 2006. People have been writing “You Might Not Need jQuery” articles since 2013 (see this classic site and this classic repo). I don’t want to rehash old territory, but a good bit has changed in browser land since the last You Might Not Need jQuery article you might have stumbled upon. Browsers continue to implement new APIs that take the pain away from library-free development, many of them directly copied from jQuery. Let’s go through some new vanilla alternatives to jQuery methods. Remove an element from the page Remember the maddeningly roundabout way you had to remove an element from the page with vanilla DOM? el.parentNode.removeChild(el);? Here’s a comparison of the jQuery way and the new improved vanilla way. jQuery: var $elem = $(“.someClass”) //select the element $elem.remove(); //remove the…

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Form Validation – Part 4: Validating the MailChimp Subscribe Form

Over the last few articles in this series, we’ve learned how to use a handful of input types and validation attributes to natively validate forms. We’ve learned how to use the Constraint Validation API to enhance the native browser validation process for a better overall user experience. And we wrote a polyfill to extend support all the way back to IE9 (and plug a few feature holes in some newer versions). Now, let’s take what we’ve learned and apply it to a real example: the MailChimp signup form. Article Series: Constraint Validation in HTML The Constraint Validation API in JavaScript A Validity State API Polyfill Validating the MailChimp Subscribe Form (You are here!) A simple form with a large footprint When you embed a MailChimp signup form on your site, it comes with a JavaScript validation script named `mc-validate.js`. This file is 140kb (minified), and includes the entire jQuery library,…

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Form Validation Part 1: Constraint Validation in HTML

Most JavaScript form validation libraries are large, and often require other libraries like jQuery. For example, MailChimp’s embeddable form includes a 140kb validation file (minified). It includes the entire jQuery library, a third-party form validation plugin, and some custom MailChimp code. In fact, that setup is what inspired this new series about modern form validation. What new tools do we have these days for form validation? What is possible? What is still needed? In this series, I’m going to show you two lightweight ways to validate forms on the front end. Both take advantage of newer web APIs. I’m also going to teach you how to push browser support for these APIs back to IE9 (which provides you with coverage for 99.6% of all web traffic worldwide). Finally, we’ll take a look at MailChimp’s sign-up form, and provide the same experience with 28× (2,800%) less code. It’s worth mentioning that…

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15 Useful JavaScript Libraries to Enhance Your Site

Inspired Magazine Inspired Magazine – creativity & inspiration daily Making a great site requires a lot of skills, but you don’t always have to develop everything completely from scratch. To use any of the JavaScript libraries presented in this article, you will need to have at least some existing JavaScript skills, but you also don’t necessarily need to be an expert. What you do need to be expert with is working out how to blend the libraries into a site to get the most benefit from them. This isn’t really something that can be taught. It’s a skill you can only learn by doing. Once you have mastered the concepts, however, there is no limit to your creativity and what you can achieve with it. Collected here is our list of the most useful JavaScript libraries available to programmers for site enhancement. You may not see your favorite listed here,…

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10 Steps to Building Faster Websites

Google says websites should load in less than 2-3 seconds and when Google speaks you better damn well listen. Actually, it’s not only Google that comes up with numbers like this; countless studies say you want to be hitting the 2-second benchmark to stop traffic and valuable leads running out the door. There’s a problem, though. As the web becomes a more complex medium, performance tends to take a backseat to glitzy features. Which is fine, if you want a fancy website hidden behind that blank loading screen, but not so good when most people quit the session before your first line of content loads. So how do you find that sweet-spot between a fully-featured website and one that hits the 2-second benchmark? #1: Be careful with website builders Website builders are great for building websites quickly but quite so good when it comes to loading times. Bulky code working under the…

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CSS Animations vs Web Animations API

There is a native API for animation in JavaScript known as the Web Animations API. We’ll call it WAAPI in this post. MDN has good documentation on it, and Dan Wilson has a great article series. In this article, we’ll compare WAAPI and animations done in CSS. A note on browser support WAAPI has a comprehensive and robust polyfill, making it usable in production today, even while browser support is limited. As ever, you can check Can I Use for browser support data. However, that doesn’t provide very good info on support of all the sub features of WAAPI. Here’s a checker for that: See the Pen WAAPI Browser Support Test by Dan Wilson (@danwilson) on CodePen. To experiment with all features without a polyfill, use Firefox Nightly. The basics of WAAPI If you’ve ever used jQuery’s .animate(), the basic syntax of WAAPI should look pretty familiar.  var element = document.querySelector(‘.animate-me’);…

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Aspect Ratio Boxes

I had a little situation the other I needed to make one of those aspect-ratio friendly boxes. This isn’t particularly new stuff. I think the original credit goes as far back as 2009 and Thierry Koblentz’s Intrinsic Ratios and maintained popularity even for other kinds of content with articles like Uncle Dave’s Ol’ Padded Box. Let’s go on a little journey through this concept, as there is plenty to talk about. The Core Concept: padding in percentages is based on width Even when that is a little unintuitive, like for vertical padding. This isn’t a hack, but it is weird: padding-top and padding-bottom is based on an element’s width. So if you had an element that is 500px wide, and padding-top of 100%, the padding-top would be 500px. Isn’t that a perfect square, 500px × 500px? Yes, it is! An aspect ratio! If we force the height of the element…

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Drupal Developer (Module) – Hendall Inc. – Rockville, MD

Experience creating custom Drupal modules. Experience building responsive websites using Drupal CMS, HTML/HTML5, CSS/CSS3, and JavaScript/jQuery….From Hendall Inc. – Thu, 01 Jun 2017 17:13:57 GMT – View all Rockville, MD jobs Source: http://rss.indeed.com/rss?q=Drupal+Developer

Reactive UI’s with VanillaJS – Part 1: Pure Functional Style

Last month Chris Coyier wrote a post investigating the question, “When Does a Project Need React?” In other words, when do the benefits of using React (acting as a stand-in for data-driven web frameworks in general), rather than server-side templates and jQuery, outweigh the added complexity of setting up the requisite tooling, build process, dependencies, etc.? A week later, Sacha Greif wrote a counterpoint post arguing why you should always use such a framework for every type of web project. His points included future-proofing, simplified workflow from project to project (a single architecture; no need to keep up with multiple types of project structures), and improved user experience because of client-side re-rendering, even when the content doesn’t change very often. In this pair of posts, I delve into a middle ground: writing reactive-style UI’s in plain old JavaScript – no frameworks, no preprocessors. Article Series: Pure Functional Style (You are…

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What is the Future of Front End Web Development?

I was asked to do a little session on this the other day. I’d say I’m underqualified to answer the question, as is any single person. If you really needed hard answers to this question, you’d probably look to aggregate data of survey results from lots of developers. I am a little qualified though. Aside from running this site which requires me to think about front end development every day and exposes me to lots of conversations about front end development, I am an active developer myself. I work on CodePen, which is quite a hive of front end developers. I also talk about it every week on ShopTalk Show with a wide variety of guests, and I get to travel all around going to conferences largely focused on front end development. So let me take a stab at it. Again, disclaimers: This is non-comprehensive These are just loose guesses…

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Senior Drupal Developer – iSolvers Inc. – Washington, DC

Senior Drupal Developer*. Drupal Developer with Web Development experience and Drupal 7, 8, Javascript, JQuery, HTML, CSS, REST API’s, PHP, JSON, SQL etc….From Indeed – Mon, 15 May 2017 11:23:33 GMT – View all Washington jobs Source: http://rss.indeed.com/rss?q=Drupal+Developer

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