Posts Tagged:iPhone

rfp-robotRFP ROBOT: Website Request for Proposal Generator

The time has come for a new website (or website redesign), which means you need to write a website request for proposal or web RFP. A Google search produces a few examples, but they vary wildly and don’t seem to speak really to your goals for developing or redesigning a new website. You need to write a website RFP that will clearly articulate your needs and generate responses from the best website designers and developers out there. But how?

Have no fear, RFP Robot is here. He will walk you through a step-by-step process to help you work through the details of your project and create a PDF formatted website design RFP that will provide the information vendors need to write an accurate bid. RFP Robot will tell you what info you should include, point out pitfalls, and give examples.


New in Basecamp 3: To-do Groups

A little thing that’s a big deal.For years, we’ve been making to-do lists in Basecamp that looked like this:See those === DIVIDERS ===? We were trying to group related to-dos together within a list. All we wanted was to bring a little structure, and an extra ounce of organization, to a single flat list.We weren’t alone. Whenever a customer showed us how they use Basecamp, we’d inevitably run into a similar === DIVIDER === pattern. They were trying to do what we were trying to do.We were all hacking it. As of today, the silliness is over. No hacks required!We just launched To-do Groups in Basecamp 3!What’s a group?A group is like a sublist on a list. It’s organization, it’s structure, it’s an envelope, it’s a box. It has a header, and to-dos grouped below.The anatomy of a Basecamp 3 to-do list with two groupsWhen you drag a group header, all the to-dos under that header move with…

Read More →

The Contrast Swap Technique: Improved Image Performance with CSS Filters

With CSS filter effects and blend modes, we can now leverage various techniques for styling images directly in the browser. However, creating aesthetic theming isn’t all that filter effects are good for. You can use filters to indicate hover state, hide passwords, and now—for web performance. While playing with profiling performance wins of using blend modes for duotone image effects (I’ll write up an article on this soon), I discovered something even more exciting. A major image optimization win! The idea is to reduce image contrast in the source image, reducing its file size, then boosting the contrast back up with CSS filters! Start with your image, then remove the contrast, and then reapply it with CSS filters. How It Works Let’s put a point on exactly how this works: Reduce image contrast using a linear transform function (Photoshop can do this) Apply a contrast filter in CSS to the…

Read More →

Manage and Protect Your Apple Devices

(This is a sponsored post.)Jamf Now is a mobile device management solution for the iPad, iPhone, and Mac devices at work. We make management tasks like deploying Wi-Fi passwords, setting up email accounts, securing company data, and enforcing passcodes, simple and affordable, so businesses can support their users. No IT required. CSS-Tricks readers can manage their first 3 devices for free, forever! Sign up today to create your free account! Direct Link to Article — Permalink Manage and Protect Your Apple Devices is a post from CSS-Tricks Source: CssTricks

What’s new in Basecamp 3.6 on iOS

This feature-packed release of Basecamp for iPhone and iPad is available in the App Store today. Here’s a look at what’s new.Improved attachments and sketchingIt all starts with a redesigned file picker. Tap the paperclip button anywhere in Basecamp to see clear buttons for each kind of thing you can attach. They’re all first-class — especially Sketch which got a big boost in this release. Now, before you upload an image to Basecamp you’ll have the option to draw on it first. It’s great for highlighting and making notes — or just having fun.Pick an image (left), tap ‘Sketch on image’, then add your drawings before uploading to Basecamp.In addition to sketching on images, we’ve also beefed-up the drawing tools. You can now choose the from 3 line weights and 5 colors to add variety and interest to your sketches. Also new: save your Basecamp sketches or share them to other apps.Works great with Apple Pencil on…

Read More →

What’s new in Basecamp 3.5.4 for iOS

🍂 Fall is here, there’s a new version of iOS, and with it comes a new release to Basecamp for iPhone and iPad. It’s available in the App Store today. Here’s a brief look at what’s new:Quick jumpQuick jump is one of our favorite new things in Basecamp this year and we’re excited to bring it to iOS. It works exactly like the desktop version, especially on iPads with a keyboard attached (either 3rd party keyboards or iPad Pro with the Smart Keyboard). Command + J to start. Arrow up/down. Enter to select. Type to filter. It’s just the same.Quick jump to projects, people, or recently visited items.It’s also available on as an experimental feature on iPhone. That’s an atypical approach for us so let me explain. As of today you can quick jump by swiping from the top edge of your iOS device with two fingers. It works pretty well but the…

Read More →

Designing Websites for iPhone X

We’ve already covered “The Notch” and the options for dealing with it from an HTML and CSS perspective. There is a bit more detail available now, straight from the horse’s mouth: Safe area insets are not a replacement for margins. … we want to specify that our padding should be the default padding or the safe area inset, whichever is greater. This can be achieved with the brand-new CSS functions min() and max() which will be available in a future Safari Technology Preview release. @supports(padding: max(0px)) { .post { padding-left: max(12px, constant(safe-area-inset-left)); padding-right: max(12px, constant(safe-area-inset-right)); } } It is important to use @supports to feature-detect min and max, because they are not supported everywhere, and due to CSS’s treatment of invalid variables, to not specify a variable inside your @supports query. Jeremey Keith’s hot takes have been especially tasty, like: You could add a bunch of proprietary CSS that Apple…

Read More →

“The Notch” and CSS

Apple’s iPhone X has a screen that covers the entire face of the phone, save for a “notch” to make space for a camera and other various components. The result is some awkward situations for screen design, like constraining websites to a “safe area” and having white bars on the edges. It’s not much of a trick to remove it though, a background-color on the body will do. Or, expand the website the whole area (notch be damned), you can add viewport-fit=cover to your meta viewport tag. <meta name=”viewport” content=”width=device-width, initial-scale=1.0, viewport-fit=cover”> Then it’s on you to account for any overlapping that normally would have been handled by the safe area. There is some new CSS that helps you accommodate for that. Stephen Radford documents: In order to handle any adjustment that may be required iOS 11’s version of Safari includes some constants that can be used when viewport-fit=cover is…

Read More →

Basecamp 3 for iOS: Hybrid Architecture

We’ve written quite a bit in the past about our approach to building hybrid mobile apps. Basecamp 3 represents the latest generation of this architecture, taking everything we’ve learned from previous versions.The first app for Basecamp 2 app was iPhone only, written in RubyMotion as a thin wrapper around UIWebView. Next, we did a new universal app for Basecamp 2, written in Xcode + Objective-C, still a using UIWebView, but with a bit more native code thrown in. For Basecamp 3, we’ve replaced Objective-C with Swift, UIWebView with WKWebView and added Turbolinks, with even more native code, and a deeper integration between native and web.Defining HybridFirst, it helps to be clear about what we mean by “hybrid”. That term is used in so many different contexts, that it’s almost meaningless. In our use, we’re referring to standard native apps where a significant portion of the content is rendered using web technology.…

Read More →

YouTube Users on iOS Can Now Live Stream Their Screens by @MattGSouthern

Google has updated its YouTube app for iOS with the ability to live stream iPhone or iPad screens.The post YouTube Users on iOS Can Now Live Stream Their Screens by @MattGSouthern appeared first on Search Engine Journal. Source: https://www.searchenginejournal.com/feed/

Highrise 3.0 for iOS

For an app that’s been around since 2007, two iterations of its iOS app seems a bit on the light side. We agree. So today we have not just one announcement, but two:Highrise 3.0 for the iPhone is now available to everyone.It has the basics from before. Stay up to date on your team’s activity. Easily search your leads and quickly call, text, or get directions. Plan your day with tasks and follow-ups.And it has some important new features.Search leads by tag. View tags on contacts. See upcoming tasks when viewing a lead.Scroll through all of your tasks. Whether you have 2 or thousands of overdue or upcoming tasks… though we still can’t help you get them done. :)And more… like the ability to enter custom fields and choose from predefined values, dial incorrectly formatted international phone numbers, emoji, saved recent searches.Alas, it doesn’t have everything for everyone yet. Some will notice it…

Read More →

Reasons to Build Your Own App

I’m working on a very small To-Do iOS app and I’m sharing my process and my thoughts candidly through the process in a new YouTube playlist affectionately titled “Let’s Build an App“. As you already know, I’m heavily involved with my startup and that’s where 99% of my time goes, but, in the 1% I’m sloooooooooowly putting this thing together. And, for the first time ever, I have a new medium through which I can share the process which is my YouTube channel. Although I’ve been pretty candid and honest historically about these indie projects, I’ve always done it through blog posts and not through any video content. So, in that way, I’m having a good time with it and it’s a bit of a different feel, which is something that keeps it fresh for me. These are truly candid captures of my thoughts and there’s no established framework of my…

Read More →

Aziz Ansari

This is some of the smartest stuff that Aziz has ever said (or at least the stuff that I’ve heard him speak about): He’s off social media. He deleted the Internet browser from his phone and laptop. No e-mail, either. Technologically speaking, he’s living in, like, 1999. Really…? As the writer ponders, did he unplug or “unplug”? Whenever you check for a new post on Instagram or whenever you go on The New York Times to see if there’s a new thing, it’s not even about the content. It’s just about seeing a new thing. You get addicted to that feeling. You’re not going to be able to control yourself. So the only way to fight that is to take yourself out of the equation and remove all these things. So, he has removed them. Entirely. He continues: What happens is, eventually you forget about it. You don’t care anymore. When I…

Read More →

Let’s Talk About Speech CSS

Boston, like many large cities, has a subway system. Commuters on it are accustomed to hearing regular public address announcements. Riders simply tune out some announcements, such as the pre-recorded station stop names repeated over and over. Or public service announcements from local politicians and celebrities—again, kind of repetitive and not worth paying attention to after the first time. Most important are service alerts, which typically deliver direct and immediate information riders need to take action on. An informal priority A regular rider’s ear gets trained to listen for important announcements, passively, while fiddling around on a phone or zoning out after a hard day of work. It’s not a perfect system—occasionally I’ll find myself trapped on a train that’s been pressed into express service. But we shouldn’t remove lower priority announcements. It’s unclear what kind of information will be important to whom: tourists, new residents, or visiting friends and…

Read More →

What’s new in Basecamp for iOS

Basecamp 3.5.1 is now available in the App Store. If you’re already a pro with Basecamp on your iPhone and iPad, you’re going to love this release. If you haven’t tried it yet, now is a great time to start taking advantage of these new time-saving features. While you’re installing the latest update, read this quick look at what’s new…Swipe for your next unreadWhen you’ve got a bunch of unreads on Hey! and you’re cranking through them, it can feel like a chore to tap an unread, read it, then go back and tap the next one. Now you can simply tap an unread and when you’re done reading it, swipe-left to go to the next one! Repeat until you’re done. Here’s how it looks:1. Tap an unread, 2. Tap OK, 3. Swipe-left to load the next one!Search inside BasecampYou probably already know you can swipe-down or swipe-left from the Home screen on your iOS…

Read More →

Enter the dot matrix

Illustration by Nate OttoTroy Henikoff was a college student in 1984 when he wrote his first program, a piece of software to help his grandfather’s steel warehouse manage their inventory. That summer project led Troy to start his own software consulting business a couple years later. This is an atypical Distance story about beginnings, endings and unexpected legacies.https://medium.com/media/e1b07d80fba4e2163e3f63e0c604a1a0/hrefTranscriptWAILIN: Troy Henikoff describes himself as an unintentional entrepreneur. Today he’s a well-known figure in Chicago’s tech scene, but when he began dabbling in computer programming and setting up his own business, there was no established startup culture for him to absorb. No networking events, no hoodies, no cliches about hustle or crushing it or changing the world. Troy’s story starts in 1984, at his grandfather’s steel warehouse on Chicago’s south side. He had just finished his sophomore year of college.TROY HENIKOFF: So that summer when I got to Chicago, I was given a bunch…

Read More →

Stay Away From These User Interface Design Mistakes

The importance of creating a functional site should not be ignored. No matter how the website is beautifully made, yet does not create interest in the site visitors, the website is doomed from the start. In other words, every aspect of the website must engage the visitor, and it all starts with great user interface design. The Importance of User Interface Design for Business Websites Web designers should always keep in mind to provide a functional site that can easily generate interest among the website visitors to create a steady traffic influx. The type of user interface design plays a significant role in driving in a high volume of web traffic. Therefore, carefully deciding which design to use should be of utmost concern. In this day and age, e-commerce has been enjoying a steady growth, raking in sales worth billions of dollars each year. This is the reason why a…

Read More →

Beautiful Social Media Icons To Use In Your Website

In this age of social media, getting your readers engaged can go a long way in driving traffic to your website. For this reason, you need to consider adding social media icons to your website. It is very important to have buttons that will allow your readers to share what they are reading from your blog or website. Social icons will give you an idea of what is attractive or appealing to your readers. Fortunately, these things can be easily downloaded and installed on your website. However, you need to make sure that the buttons you are using on your website come from reputable and safe sources. Here are some websites where you can get the best social media buttons with the highest quality and from clean, malware-free repositories: Handycons Handycons is a set of free, hand drawn social media icon set consisting of 12 icons. The pack contains icons…

Read More →

New in Basecamp 3 for iOS 3.4.1

You know that with the Android app getting updated so recently, that an update to the iOS app was not far behind. In fact, the iOS team (Jason Z, Tara, Dylan and Zach) launched the latest version last week! It’s got a sweet set of new features I’m excited to share with you.Hey! Who Moved My Pings?In previous versions of the app, Pings were a little harder to find and challenging to start. Now Pings are smartly located in the Hey section, right at the top. You’ll see a row of avatars for your most recent pings. You can quickly start a new one or swipe through previous Pings.You can also quick swipe on items in the Hey menu to mark them as read:Docs and Files List ViewThe team also added a list view for Docs & Files, with new file icons, smoother re-ordering, tap to preview images, and swipe to move and archive.https://medium.com/media/db8b86ef6deee8f9f11c7f1acb5ea7e6/hrefThese updates, along…

Read More →

Facebook Ads Case Study: How This Digital Product Got a 4X Lifetime ROI

Do you sell a digital product? Whether it’s a book, software, or course, digital products are always a lot easier to sell in theory than in reality. Selling a digital product is difficult, and there is a lot of competition on Facebook’s advertising ecosystem. However, as experience has taught us time and time again, with the right strategy, brands can get it right. Today, we are focusing on Mastin Labs, a photography software company that sells Lightroom presets that emulate film. They are long-time AdEspresso customers (almost 3 years!), and they’ve succeeded. Success wasn’t gained from any singular ad, but rather, their overall Facebook marketing and advertising strategy. With a consistent 4X lifetime return on their ads, they have something valuable to teach. Mastin Labs, started by Kirk Mastin, was born from a passion for film photography. The goal of Mastin Labs is not to replace film, but to rather…

Read More →

Back to Top