Posts Tagged:iOS

rfp-robotRFP ROBOT: Website Request for Proposal Generator

The time has come for a new website (or website redesign), which means you need to write a website request for proposal or web RFP. A Google search produces a few examples, but they vary wildly and don’t seem to speak really to your goals for developing or redesigning a new website. You need to write a website RFP that will clearly articulate your needs and generate responses from the best website designers and developers out there. But how?

Have no fear, RFP Robot is here. He will walk you through a step-by-step process to help you work through the details of your project and create a PDF formatted website design RFP that will provide the information vendors need to write an accurate bid. RFP Robot will tell you what info you should include, point out pitfalls, and give examples.


Prix Avira : découvrez la grille tarifaire complète du fournisseur

A une époque où les attaques informatiques viennent de partout, posséder un antivirus n’est pas un luxe. Parmi les antivirus les plus recommandés, Avira occupe une place de choix. Seulement, ce n’est pas évident que vous puissiez tirer le maximum de ses fonctionnalités en utilisant la version gratuite. Pour ceux qui souhaitent acheter la version complète, voici les prix Avira. Résumé de notre article[wpsm_toplist h2] Pourquoi opter pour Avira ? Ce n’est pas par hasard qu’Avira Antivirus Pro 2019 a été distingué Top Product par l’AV-TEST. Si la version gratuite de l’antivirus était déjà très performante, le logiciel payant atteint des niveaux de performance qui en font une des références dans la protection contre les logiciels malveillants. La mise à niveau de la version gratuite vers Avira Antivirus Pro se révèle très intéressante. Elle fournit une protection fiable pour la navigation, les e-mails et les téléchargements. Son scanner, en temps…

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Twitter is Removing the Ability to Create ‘Moments’ on Mobile Apps by @MattGSouthern

Twitter is removing the ability to create Moments on its iOS and Android apps on October 23rd.The post Twitter is Removing the Ability to Create ‘Moments’ on Mobile Apps by @MattGSouthern appeared first on Search Engine Journal. Source: https://www.searchenginejournal.com/feed/

Google Assistant Gets Redesigned on iOS and Android by @MattGSouthern

Google’s Assistant app has been redesigned on iOS and Android to be equally accommodating for both voice and touch input.The post Google Assistant Gets Redesigned on iOS and Android by @MattGSouthern appeared first on Search Engine Journal. Source: https://www.searchenginejournal.com/feed/

Safari Ripper ☠️

Security researcher Sabri posted a bit of code that will “force restart any iOS device.” It’s interesting to see HTML & CSS have this kind of dangerous power. It’s essentially a ton of <div>s scaled to be pretty huge and then set over a repeating JPG image with each <div> blurring the background via backdrop-filter. It must cause such extreme and unhandled memory usage that it wreaks havoc on the browser as well as the entire operating system. I was trying to test it out myself and be really careful not to execute it… but of course I did, and it crashed my Chrome 68 on a MacBook Pro. Not the whole operating system, but I had to force quit the browser. Then again, I suppose even while(true) {} can do that! The comment thread on the gist hast more interesting details, like how it crashes iOS Safari 9+ (including…

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Best Practices for Background Videos

Background videos, if done right, can look stunning, draw attention, convey an idea and an overall experience for the user, and possibly lead to users taking positive action. If done wrong, they can be distracting, perform poorly, and possibly even be disorientating for users. So how can we ensure that a background video is done right? There’s a lot to consider, but the following guidelines and best practices will help ensure the best end result! Background video on rotary.org General Production Guidelines Keep the video relatively short Longer videos will have a greater file size, will consume more of the user’s bandwidth, and may take longer to start streaming. Keep the video around 10-15 seconds in length. That should be an adequate amount of time to convey an intended idea or emotion. Avoid excessive movement Some movement is okay, but excessive movement can be distracting and unwelcome. Also, keep in…

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What You Need to Know About WCAG 2.1

Background on WCAG The Web Content Accessibility Guidelines (WCAG) 2.0 have been the international standard for accessibility since the European Union adopted them in 2016. WCAG 2.1 adds new requirements to each of the three compliance levels (A, AA, and AAA). Here at Viget, we aim to comply with WCAG Level A on all projects and we work with clients to determine which aspects of AA and AAA compliance are appropriate for their audiences. What’s New in Level A Label and name text should match on HTML elements (2.5.3). It’s important to note that this standard isn’t necessarily referring to the name attribute on input elements. For some elements, identifiable text could be a label, the text inside the element or the name attribute. Don’t rely on device motion or wild pointer gestures for functionality (2.5.4 & 2.5.1). This one may seem like a no-brainer, but as digital experiences continue…

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New in Basecamp: Recurring Events

Now you can add [daily, weekly, monthly, yearly] repeating events to the Basecamp schedule. Here’s how it works:When you add an event in Basecamp 3……you’ll see a new option to repeat the event……the options include every day, every week day, once a week, once a month, and once a year……you can choose to repeat the event forever, or until a certain date……the repeat frequency is shown on the event page as well…This feature has been a long time coming. Thanks to everyone who sent in a request, to Merissa on the support team for championing the push to make this happen, and to Jeff, Conor, Pratik, and everyone else who pitched in to help make it all work. The new feature is live for all Basecamp 3 customers on all platforms (Web, Mac Desktop, Windows Desktop, iOS iPhone + iPad, and Android). We hope you find it useful.New in Basecamp: Recurring Events was originally published in Signal…

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Practical CSS Scroll Snapping

CSS scroll snapping allows you to lock the viewport to certain elements or locations after a user has finished scrolling. It’s great for building interactions like this one: Live Demo Browser support and basic usage Browser support for CSS scroll snapping has improved significantly since it was introduced in 2016, with Google Chrome (69+), Firefox, Edge, and Safari all supporting some version of it. This browser support data is from Caniuse, which has more detail. A number indicates that browser supports the feature at that version and up.DesktopChromeOperaFirefoxIEEdgeSafari69No6311*18*11Mobile / TabletiOS SafariOpera MobileOpera MiniAndroidAndroid ChromeAndroid Firefox11.0-11.2NoNoNoNo60 Scroll snapping is used by setting the scroll-snap-type property on a container element and the scroll-snap-align property on elements inside it. When the container element is scrolled, it will snap to the child elements you’ve defined. In its most basic form, it looks like this: <div class=’container’> <section class=’child’></section> <section class=’child’></section> <section class=’child’></section> … </div>…

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Sticky, Smooth, Active Nav

Just like the title says! Here’s a sidebar navigation bar that… Uses sticky positioning. It stays on the screen when it can, but won’t overlap the header, footer, or ever make any of it’s links inaccessible. Scrolls smoothly to the sections you click to. Activates the current nav based on scroll position (it’s a single page thing). See the Pen Sticky, Smooth, Active Nav by Chris Coyier (@chriscoyier) on CodePen. Sticky It’s easy to toss position: sticky; top: 0; on something. But for it to work, it’s gotta be within a taller parent element. So, the unordered list (<ul>) within the navigation (<nav>) works great here. Thanks to the CSS grid layout, the <nav> is as tall as the <main> content area. However, note that that we also gotta position: -webkit-sticky; for iOS. I also tossed in a magic number for the vertical media query so that it doesn’t stick…

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The trick to viewport units on mobile

Viewport units have always been controversial and some of that is because of how mobile browsers have made things more complicated by having their own opinions about how to implement them. Case in point: should the scrollbar be taken into account for the vw unit? What about a site’s navigation or page controls — should those count in the calculation? Then there are physical attributes of the devices themselves (hello, notch!) that can’t be overlooked. First, a little context The spec is pretty vague about how viewport units should be calculated. With mobile devices, we’re often concerned with the vertical height, so let’s look specifically at viewport height (vh): vh unit Equal to 1% of the height of the initial containing block. So yeah, no clear guidance there when it comes to handling device and browser-specific differentiations. vh was initially calculated by the current viewport of your browser. If you…

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On xlink:href being deprecated in SVG

A reader wrote in to tell me we should update our articles about SVG <use> elements. The attribute we always use for them, xlink:href, is deprecated. Indeed, MDN says: That’s pretty strong language, hence the reader’s warning. This is a bit surprising to me, as the SVG 2 thing got a little weird. It looks like it did become a Candidate Recommendation though. So… <!– This is old –> <svg> <use xlink:href=”#whatever” /> </svg> <!– This is new –> <svg> <use href=”#whatever” /> </svg> I like it. But does it actually work? Lemme fork my little old demo and change all the references. In a quick run through of what I have easy access to: Chrome 67 Firefox 61 Safari 11 Edge 17 IE 11 iOS 11 ✅ ✅ 🙅‍♂️ ✅ ✅ 🙅‍♂️ Better than I thought! But enough 🙅‍♂️ no-go’s there that up and switching everything seems far too…

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Sometimes `sizes` is quite important.

Paraphrased question from email: I just read your article Responsive Images: If you’re just changing resolutions, use srcset. In the age of “responsive websites,” srcset does not help in certain situations. For example, I have a popular products slider. On mobile, I have one image per slide where the images are 320px wide. On desktop, I have six images per slide where each is 160px wide. So the desktop images are smaller on desktop, not bigger. How do I handle this situation with srcset? I tried to be careful with that post title: “If you’re just changing resolutions, use srcset.” In this case, we’re changing the size of the images not just at certain resolutions, but at specific breakpoints as well, which means we’re also going to need to use the sizes attribute to get the most out of responsive images. The entire job of the sizes attribute is to…

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Are These Browsers Going to the Moon?

Chrome, Safari, Firefox, Edge, and (unfortunately) Internet Explorer are the most popular browsers today, and they are great. They have awesome features, sweet add-ons, and most people never give them a second thought. This post is not about those browsers, it’s about the other browsers. Browsers that can help users stay anonymous and protect their identity. Browsers that can eliminate ads and support publishers and content creators through cryptocurrency micropayments. Browsers using new protocols that promise a truly decentralized internet. Browsers that double as cryptocurrency wallets and connect users to what the, perhaps too optimistic call “web 3.0.” Coming up are four browsers that may change the way we think about the internet. Brave Browser: The micropayments experiment The Brave Browser (for Desktop) has a bunch of cool features. Brave is a micropayments platform using their own ERC20 token (BATs), it is an ad blocker, and it allows users to…

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What’s New in Basecamp 3.9.3 for iOS

The newest release introduces a brand new tab along with improvements to searching, navigation, and for people who have multiple accounts. Get it for iPhone and iPad in the App Store today. Read-on for details about what’s new…New Me tab!We know that My Assignments is one of the most popular screens in Basecamp on all platforms but it can be hard to find. Now My Assignments and the rest of My Stuff are easier to reach on the new Me tab. It also includes your Bookmarks and app Settings.Introdcing he brand new Me tab, a place to find all your stuff and settings.New Activity view switcherGone is the old Activity | Reports toggle. Basecamp now has a nice switcher to change between activity views more akin to web and mobile web. It’s easier to see what you’re currently looking at and you now stay on the same screen rather than navigating forward.Tap the…

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Tweetbot 3 for Twitter

I’ve been using Tweetbot for a loooooong time. Both the macOS and iOS versions are, in my humble opinion, the best Twitter clients available today. I’ve loved using them and have faithfully purchased upgrades every time they drop something new as I have no qualms with paying for good software. But… Tweetbot 3 for macOS was the first time that they released something that was practically useless for me. In other words, it was a major step back and “broke” a ton of natural and native workflows. No bueno. Apparently I wasn’t the only one and so they added this notice to some subsequent updates: Tweetbot 3… didn’t go over so well. Tweetbot is a complex app and as part of 3.0 we took the opportunity to simplify a number of things. This worked well but we took away a handful of options some people depended on. We are working…

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World wide wrist

After all the hubbub with WWDC over the past couple of days, Ethan Marcotte is excited about the news that the Apple Watch will be able to view web content. He writes: If I had to guess, I’d imagine some sort of “reader mode” is coming to the Watch: in other words, when you open a link on your Watch, this minified version of WebKit wouldn’t act like a full browser. Instead of rendering all your scripts, styles, and layout, mini-WebKit would present a stripped-down version of your web page. If that’s the case, then Jen Simmons’s suggestion is spot-on: it just got a lot more important to design from a sensible, small screen-friendly document structure built atop semantic HTML. But who knows! I could be wrong! Maybe it’s a more capable browser than I’m assuming, and we’ll start talking about best practices for layout, typography, and design on watches.…

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Drupal.org gets videos that make Drupal easier to learn

In the beginning of the year I started doing some iOS development for my POSSE plan. As I was new to iOS development, I decided to teach myself by watching short, instructional videos. Different people learn in different ways, but for me, videos tutorials were the most effective way to learn. Given that recent experience, I’m very excited to share that all of the task tutorials in the Drupal 8 User Guide are now accompanied by video tutorials. These videos are embedded directly into every user guide page on Drupal.org. You can see an example on the “Editing with the in-place editor” page. These videos provide a great introduction to installing, administering, site building and maintaining the content of a Drupal-based website — all important skills for a new Drupalist to learn. Supplementing user guides with video tutorials is an important step towards improving our evaluator experience, as video can…

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Google Maps Lets Users Customize Navigation Icons by @MattGSouthern

Google is letting users customize their navigation experience on the Google Maps app for iOS with new vehicle icons.The post Google Maps Lets Users Customize Navigation Icons by @MattGSouthern appeared first on Search Engine Journal. Source: https://www.searchenginejournal.com/feed/

All-New Google News App Now Available on iPhone and iPad by @MattGSouthern

Google has released a completely revamped version of its Google News app on the iOS App Store.The post All-New Google News App Now Available on iPhone and iPad by @MattGSouthern appeared first on Search Engine Journal. Source: https://www.searchenginejournal.com/feed/

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