Posts Tagged:Internet

rfp-robotRFP ROBOT: Website Request for Proposal Generator

The time has come for a new website (or website redesign), which means you need to write a website request for proposal or web RFP. A Google search produces a few examples, but they vary wildly and don’t seem to speak really to your goals for developing or redesigning a new website. You need to write a website RFP that will clearly articulate your needs and generate responses from the best website designers and developers out there. But how?

Have no fear, RFP Robot is here. He will walk you through a step-by-step process to help you work through the details of your project and create a PDF formatted website design RFP that will provide the information vendors need to write an accurate bid. RFP Robot will tell you what info you should include, point out pitfalls, and give examples.


The Changing Face of Web Design in 2018

Inspired Magazine Inspired Magazine – creativity & inspiration daily One of the interesting recent developments in web design trends is actually the trend away from trends… or in other word what is happening is a kind of regression to simpler ways, at least from those in the know. On the other side of the coin, there’s a big shift happening in certain types of corporate sites, especially some British and American media sites, where there’s a tendency to overload pages with so much extraneous content that it can severely impact on the ability of the user to see the content they actually arrived to see. If the first two paragraphs sound hopeless tangled, well that’s a very succinct allegory for the state of web development in 2018… tangled. It’s a problem we need to sort out, because it won’t be good for anyone if web standards continue to slip. We’ll…

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On Education Startups and Failure

Why do education startups fail? Because… Most entrepreneurs in education build the wrong type of business, because entrepreneurs think of education as a quality problem. The average person thinks of it as a cost problem. Building in education does not follow an Internet company’s growth curve. Do it because you want to fix problems in education for the next 20 years. There are opportunities in education in servicing the poor in the US and building a company in Asia — not in selling to the middle class in the US. The underlying culture will change and expose interesting opportunities in the long term, but probably not for another 5 years. Read more: Why Education Startups Do Not Succeed The post On Education Startups and Failure appeared first on John Saddington. Source: https://john.do/

We have 10 days to save net neutrality

Last month, the Chairman of the Federal Communications Commission, Ajit Pai, released a draft order that would soften net neutrality regulations. He wants to overturn the restrictions that make paid prioritization, blocking or throttling of traffic unlawful. If approved, this order could drastically alter the way that people experience and access the web. Without net neutrality, Internet Service Providers could determine what sites you can or cannot see. The proposed draft order is disheartening. Millions of Americans are trying to save net neutrality; the FCC has received over 5 million emails, 750,000 phone calls, and 2 million comments. Unfortunately this public outpouring has not altered the FCC’s commitment to dismantling net neutrality. The commission will vote on the order on December 14th. We have 10 days to save net neutrality. Although I have written about net neutrality before, I want to explain the consequences and urgency of the FCC’s upcoming…

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We have 10 days to save net neutrality

Last month, the Chairman of the Federal Communications Commission, Ajit Pai, released a draft order that would soften net neutrality regulations. He wants to overturn the restrictions that make paid prioritization, blocking or throttling of traffic unlawful. If approved, this order could drastically alter the way that people experience and access the web. Without net neutrality, Internet Service Providers could determine what sites you can or cannot see. The proposed draft order is disheartening. Millions of Americans are trying to save net neutrality; the FCC has received over 5 million emails, 750,000 phone calls, and 2 million comments. Unfortunately this public outpouring has not altered the FCC’s commitment to dismantling net neutrality. The commission will vote on the order on December 14th. We have 10 days to save net neutrality. Although I have written about net neutrality before, I want to explain the consequences and urgency of the FCC’s upcoming…

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On Small Projects

I credit my entire software development experience and skill to the fact that I have constantly experimented, built, and launched small projects. Sometimes I wanted to explore a single programming concept and/or element or sometimes I wanted to see how potential customers and users would respond. Eventually, of course, these projects would become much, much larger in scope and scale but I would attack them in the same way and fashion: Execute quickly and see what the market would say. Some (most) of the these projects died without much fanfare and without much use and occasionally they’d get a little bit of attention. What’s fascinating is that it was, and still is, impossible to know what would work and what wouldn’t work and there was no obvious correlation or relationship between investment of time and customer resonance. Sometimes, a throw-away piece of software would blow up and people would really care…

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Techniques To Humanize Your Website and Connect With Your Audience

Have you ever visited a website and wondered if anyone was working round the clock behind the scenes to make sure that your user experience feels personal? A lot of business owners are using their websites as a way to connect with their prospective clients, especially if they cannot personally communicate with them. This is the reason you need to go to great lengths to humanize your website. In this article, we will look into the importance of making your websites more human, and some effective tips and tricks to pull this off. The website represents you and your business The success of any business involves a lot of factors to consider. Some of these include having the right mindset on how to take care of the business, and having enough resources to start the business. Meanwhile, other companies focus on hiring the right people who can do the job,…

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Save 15% or More on Car Insurance by Switching to Plain JavaScript

Satire disclaimer: This article is as much satire as it is serious insight if there is even any of that at all. Don’t take it too seriously, but do tell all your friends. Also, the bit about Taco Bell is 100% true. I wouldn’t joke about something like that. My day usually begins like this: I wake up at 6:15 a.m. (kill me) to get the kids ready for school. They’re mad. I’m mad. Everyone is on the brink of an emotional breakdown because it’s 6:15 in the morning. Usually the first thing that I do when I wake up is roll out of bed and start hammering out pushups like Christian Bale. BWAHAHAHA. No. Before I’m even fully awake and out of bed, I grab my phone and look at Twitter. It’s a sickness, I know. I’m not proud of it but at least I’m out here admitting that I…

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What Matters Most When You Apply: Six Myths Debunked

Job searching is daunting. Polishing your cover letter(s), perfecting your resume, and finding a professional photo for your LinkedIn is practically a full-time job in itself. Sure, college career centers and bootcamps have great resources and networks, but most job seekers are doing the majority of the legwork themselves. As a recent(ish) college grad who now sits on the other side of the job search, I want to debunk some of the myths that I had heard coming into my first job search. If you’re applying to a small or medium-sized agency like Viget, you can confidently disregard these myths and, hopefully, have a more successful job search. #1: Job Applications Go Straight Into the Ether Most applications go through an Applicant Tracking System (ATS) or into an HR specific-email. It’s easy to think that because you’re not submitting your resume directly to a person that your application just disappears into…

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Move Slowly and Fix Things

Synoptic Table of Physiognomic TraitsRuminations on the heavy weight of software design in the 21st century.Recently I took a monthlong sabbatical from my job as a designer at Basecamp. (Basecamp is an incredible company that gives us a paid month off every 3 years.)When you take 30 days away from work, you have a lot of time and headspace that’s normally used up. Inevitably you start to reflect on your life.And so, I pondered what the hell I’m doing with mine. What does it mean to be a software designer in 2018, compared to when I first began my weird career in the early 2000s?The answer is weighing on me.As software continues to invade our lives in surreptitious ways, the social and ethical implications are increasingly significant.Our work is HEAVY and it’s getting heavier all the time. I think a lot of designers haven’t deeply considered this, and they don’t appreciate the real-life effects of…

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A Travis CI/Github Security Vulnerability

For the past 6 years, private Github repositories using Travis CI have been vulnerable to a privilege escalation attack. Under certain configurations, an attacker with read-only access to the Github repo could change the code just by submitting a pull request. This was reported to the Travis CI security team and has been fixed. Introduction About two months ago Dane Powell, a co-worker in Professional Services, messaged me asking to help him verify that Travis CI was allowing him access to a private SSH key. I took a look at the build and confirmed there was a public and private key pair accessible when a build was running on the Travis CI container. Looking into other repos and builds, it became apparent that SSH keys only existed on private Github repos. This made sense because Travis CI can simply clone a public repo over HTTP with no authorization required. With…

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Discover The Fatwigoo

When you use a bit of inline <svg> and you don’t set height and width, but you do set a viewBox, that’s a fitwigoo. I love the name. The problem with fatwigoo’s is that the <svg> will size itself like a block-level element, rendering enormously until the CSS comes in and (likely) has sizing rules to size it into place. It’s one of those things where if you develop with pretty fast internet, you might not ever see it. But if you’re somewhere where the internet is slow or has high latency (or if you’re Karl Dubost and literally block CSS), you’ll probably see it all the time. I was an offender before I learned how obnoxious this is. At first, it felt weird to size things in HTML rather than CSS. My solution now is generally to leave sensible defaults on inline SVG (probably icons) like height=”20″ width=”20″ and…

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Simple trend?

Photo by PriwoIt’s getting to be that season of 2018 trend spotting. Someone recently asked me if I saw a trend in software becoming simpler…I was a kid and my father oddly started coming home late at night from work. Worried, I asked my mom what he was up to. She told me he was working “overtime”.My dad, a commercial real estate agent, was putting in extra hours to close some deals so he could afford to buy our first VCR and microwave.And when he did, they were glorious. I couldn’t wait to go to the video store with my dad. My family would sit in front of the TV each with our own bowl of popcorn. Everything was right with the world.Except, one thing.The clock was always blinking. If the VCR ever lost power, and I wasn’t around to set the clock, my parents couldn’t ever figure out how to set the thing.…

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ARIA is Spackle, Not Rebar

Much like their physical counterparts, the materials we use to build websites have purpose. To use them without understanding their strengths and limitations is irresponsible. Nobody wants to live in an poorly-built house. So why are poorly-built websites acceptable? In this post, I’m going to address WAI-ARIA, and how misusing it can do more harm than good. Materials as technology In construction, spackle is used to fix minor defects on interiors. It is a thick paste that dries into a solid surface that can be sanded smooth and painted over. Most renters become acquainted with it when attempting to get their damage deposit back. Rebar is a lattice of steel rods used to reinforce concrete. Every modern building uses it—chances are good you’ll see it walking past any decent-sized construction site. Technology as materials HTML is the rebar-reinforced concrete of the web. To stretch the metaphor, CSS is the interior…

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The Contrast Swap Technique: Improved Image Performance with CSS Filters

With CSS filter effects and blend modes, we can now leverage various techniques for styling images directly in the browser. However, creating aesthetic theming isn’t all that filter effects are good for. You can use filters to indicate hover state, hide passwords, and now—for web performance. While playing with profiling performance wins of using blend modes for duotone image effects (I’ll write up an article on this soon), I discovered something even more exciting. A major image optimization win! The idea is to reduce image contrast in the source image, reducing its file size, then boosting the contrast back up with CSS filters! Start with your image, then remove the contrast, and then reapply it with CSS filters. How It Works Let’s put a point on exactly how this works: Reduce image contrast using a linear transform function (Photoshop can do this) Apply a contrast filter in CSS to the…

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Stripe Atlas

I’m putting together something new. This shouldn’t be a massive surprise, but, I thought I might as well continue to do what I normally do… share the process as much as I can. So, something new that I’m doing this time around as I put things together is that I’ve decided to pony up $500 and use Stripe Atlas which bills itself as the “best way to start an internet business”. Getting it done. Thankfully I have a few friends who are already members and part of the service so that I got fast-tracked into the application process and hopefully can put things together really quick. I can’t imagine the process going any more smooth than it already has and since this is super-early stage, well, there’s nothing unique or distinct that should throw off their standard procedure(s). Putting a new organization together has never been more simple. This is the way…

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3 Things to Consider Before Switching Hosting

Inspired Magazine Inspired Magazine – creativity & inspiration daily Are you fed up with your current host and now you’re looking for a different provider? Maybe you found a cheaper host or a faster one or a host that offers some sort of benefit like a website builder. These are all valid reasons to switch hosting companies, but it’s essential to consider a few things before making the big change. First of all, no matter how much the host tells you that they’ll do everything for you, some of the work is going to be completed by you. Most notably, your email address transfer. Some companies don’t have email addresses provided through their host, so those people won’t have to worry about anything. However, it takes some reading, understanding, and frustration to configure your Outlook or other inboxes with the new hosting credentials. So, start by understanding that moving hosts…

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Code Review Etiquette

Code reviews are a big part of writing software, especially when working within a team. It is important to have an agreed-upon etiquette for reviewing code within a team. A code review is a critique and a critique can often feel more personal than the code writing itself. A sloppy, under-researched, or insensitive code critique can cause difficulties between team members, reduce overall team productivity, and diminish code quality over time. This post will briefly define code reviews, describe some common mistakes, and provide some quick tips for improving a code review process. What are code reviews? Code reviews are the process of sharing code so that other engineers can review it. Code reviews can happen verbally during pair programming sessions, or through reviewing code on websites like CodePen and GitHub. Mainly, code reviews happen in tools like GitHub when engineers submit pull requests. Critiques are hugely beneficial. Convening engineers…

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Google Analytics Metrics: How To Boost Return Visits to your Website

If you’ve been using Google Analytics for a while now, you’ve probably become acquainted with some of the popular features of this nifty web analytics tool. I love how it gives me an accurate picture of how popular my sites are, based on the number of visits and number of unique visitors. Data on Returning Visitors If you’re fairly new to Google Analytics – or if you’ve been monitoring the number of page visits only – then there’s a big chance that you’re missing out on an amazing set of data: returning visitors. To view this piece of data, log in to Google Analytics, then go to Audience > Behavior > New vs Returning. You should see a line graph of the total number of sessions per day, and a table of returning visitors and new visitors at the bottom of the page. Wondering what this particular Google Analytics data…

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A Look Back at the History of CSS

When you think of HTML and CSS, you probably imagine them as a package deal. But for years after Tim Berners-Lee first created the World Wide Web in 1989, there was no such thing as CSS. The original plan for the web offered no way to style a website at all. There’s a now-infamous post buried in the archives of the WWW mailing list. It was written by Marc Andreessen in 1994, who would go on to co-create both the Mosaic and Netscape browsers. In the post, Andreessen remarked that because there was no way to style a website with HTML, the only thing he could tell web developers when asked about visual design was, “sorry you’re screwed.” 10 years later, CSS was on its way to full adoption by a newly enthused web community. *W**hat happened along the way?* Finding a Styling Language There were plenty of ideas for…

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