Posts Tagged:Internet

rfp-robotRFP ROBOT: Website Request for Proposal Generator

The time has come for a new website (or website redesign), which means you need to write a website request for proposal or web RFP. A Google search produces a few examples, but they vary wildly and don’t seem to speak really to your goals for developing or redesigning a new website. You need to write a website RFP that will clearly articulate your needs and generate responses from the best website designers and developers out there. But how?

Have no fear, RFP Robot is here. He will walk you through a step-by-step process to help you work through the details of your project and create a PDF formatted website design RFP that will provide the information vendors need to write an accurate bid. RFP Robot will tell you what info you should include, point out pitfalls, and give examples.


6 Components Moodboards Must Have To Be Effective

Moodboards have been in use for many years especially in the interior design and fashion industries. It’s the first step when brainstorming ideas that’ll contribute to the overall look and feel of the final product. Most established web designers create mood boards as part of their web design process. The main benefits of using a mood board include: Streamlining the design process Reducing the time taken to design the actual website Giving the client a general idea of what to expect early Less frustration Effectively communicate concepts Making it easy to make design changes and revisions A mood board can either be physical or digital. The physical ones are more time consuming since they involve putting together paper cuttings and other physical sources for inspiration. However, they tend to have a higher impact on clients. On the other hand, digital boards are easier to create and are less physically tasking.…

Read More →

World Wide Web, Not Wealthy Western Web

Bruce Lawson explores many of the misconceptions that web designers might have when building websites. The crux of his argument is that we should be focusing on designing for users that are just getting online and for those that have frustratingly slow internet connection speeds. He even makes a bold prediction: Many of your next customers will come from the area circled below, if only because there are more human beings alive in this circle than in the world outside the circle. Direct Link to Article — Permalink World Wide Web, Not Wealthy Western Web is a post from CSS-Tricks Source: CssTricks

Celebrate the web by using another browser than Google’s Chrome

I like Chrome. It’s a great browser. But it’s not so good that it deserves to be the only browser. And that’s the unfortunate opportunity we, people browsing the web, are opening for Google by so overwhelmingly choosing to use it in face of the alternatives.And this is what we get by doing so: DirecTV just announced that they’ll be turning their website into a Chrome desktop app on June 1st. They don’t actually say that, but that’s what they mean. You can’t call directvnow.com a website if it only works in a single browser.You don’t have to be that old to remember the dark days when Internet Explorer strangled the web by its utter domination. When large swaths of the web was only accessible through Redmond. Those were not happy days.Ironically, it was Google’s Chrome that helped fight back the scourge of Internet Explorer’s monopoly. Well, that plus the utter neglect…

Read More →

Stay Away From These User Interface Design Mistakes

The importance of creating a functional site should not be ignored. No matter how the website is beautifully made, yet does not create interest in the site visitors, the website is doomed from the start. In other words, every aspect of the website must engage the visitor, and it all starts with great user interface design. The Importance of User Interface Design for Business Websites Web designers should always keep in mind to provide a functional site that can easily generate interest among the website visitors to create a steady traffic influx. The type of user interface design plays a significant role in driving in a high volume of web traffic. Therefore, carefully deciding which design to use should be of utmost concern. In this day and age, e-commerce has been enjoying a steady growth, raking in sales worth billions of dollars each year. This is the reason why a…

Read More →

Interland: Be Internet Awesome

This is a neat resource for parents and kids to learn more about things like privacy and cyberbullying and the dangers of the digital world. They even have an interactive world for kids to learn some of the principles and mechanics of these types of situations. Take a look at their virtual playground: Interland. Reality River! Mindful Mountain! Tower of Treasure! Kind Kingdom! I won’t lie… this is good for kids but I’d venture to say that a lot of adults could use a quick reminder of some of these things as well. And the gameplay and graphics and musical score is actually quite good. Really impressed with the work done here! They even have a larger PDF guidebook and resource to download as well, which they are calling a “Digital Citizenship and Safety Curriculum”: You can download it directly here. The post Interland: Be Internet Awesome appeared first on John…

Read More →

The Business Cycle, Part 2

Illustration by Nate OttoIn 2010, as Worksman Cycles was emerging from the recession and ready to grow again, the maker of heavy-duty cycles saw an exciting opportunity to supply the bikes for New York City’s bike share program. But the city rejected Worksman’s proposal, and that disappointment lay the groundwork for the company to relocate to South Carolina, leaving behind the city it had been in since its founding in 1898.https://medium.com/media/901224cccd4e0495d70e91001864ff63/hrefThis is the second part of our story on Worksman Cycles. If you missed the first episode, which explores the company’s history and commitment to keep manufacturing bikes in the U.S., be sure to catch up!TranscriptWAILIN WONG: Hi everyone, it’s Wailin. This is the second episode in our two-parter about Worksman Cycles, so you should go back and listen to the previous episode if you haven’t already. It’s about how Worksman found its niche making industrial cycles and kept its manufacturing in the…

Read More →

Cleaning Up Twitter

One of the things that I’ve been doing, behind the scenes, is cleaning up a lot of my social network accounts that aren’t being used. You see, even though I’ve put Twitter on “bot-mode” I still have a lot of other accounts that just need to be deleted entirely. Ewww. So, what I’ve done is delete nearly all of my Twitter accounts that I have (and I know how many I have via 1Password). I couldn’t believe how many that I’ve had and it’s kind of embarrassing to be honest. For every project that I created I started a new Twitter account because I believed that it was necessary for the project’s success. I actually believe that you can be just as successful without Twitter and many of the social networks that the many “gurus” and “the pros” recommend. You see, in a world where signing up for Twitter and using it…

Read More →

Fun with Viewport Units

Viewport units have been around for several years now, with near-perfect support in the major browsers, but I keep finding new and exciting ways to use them. I thought it would be fun to review the basics, and then round-up some of my favorite use-cases. What are viewport units? Four new “viewport-relative” units appeared in the CSS specifications between 2011 and 2015, as part of the W3C’s CSS Values and Units Module Level 3. The new units – vw, vh, vmin, and vmax – work similarly to existing length units like px or em, but represent a percentage of the current browser viewport. Viewport Width (vw) – A percentage of the full viewport width. 10vw will resolve to 10% of the current viewport width, or 48px on a phone that is 480px wide. The difference between % and vw is most similar to the difference between em and rem. A…

Read More →

Is It Time to Finally Kill Off the Homepage?

As with most things in web design, the homepage has been branded dead or dying many times over the years. They’ve been replaced by magazine-style front page designs, bypassed by landing pages and cut out entirely by social media. Except none of these things killed the homepage. Instead, they joined it as part of a more intricate set of interactions with visitors – each one playing an important role in a more complex web. Now, the latest person calling for the head of homepages is Optimizely’s Cara Harsham, who wrote for the Moz blog last week, claiming her company has “successfully killed THE homepage”. Well folks, looks like it’s time to get those funeral suits pressed again. Personalization killed the homepage The crux of Cara Harsham’s article is that brands need to show users customised content based on their needs and previous interactions, thereby making the generic homepage irrelevant. Her article makes a lot of…

Read More →

Online Ads: Simple Mistakes That Might Be Costing You

Inspired Magazine Inspired Magazine – creativity & inspiration daily The world of online advertising is segregated into publishers and advertisers. The publisher is the owner of a site who allows somebody else to advertise on it, while the advertiser is obviously the one doing the advertising.  In some cases the publisher may also be the advertiser, and when this happens it is called internal advertising.  Everything else is external advertising. Why these terms need to be defined is because they strongly affect how much tolerance and acceptance an audience is likely to have for being exposed to the ad.  In general, an audience will have much higher levels of trust and acceptance in the case of internal advertising, and in turn they are more likely to let their guard down and potentially engage with the advertisement. On the other hand, external advertising can generate a wide range of responses, but…

Read More →

Friduction: the internet's unstoppable drive to eliminate friction

There is one significant trend that I have noticed over and over again: the internet’s continuous drive to mitigate friction in user experiences and business models. Since the internet’s commercial debut in the early 90s, it has captured success and upset the established order by eliminating unnecessary middlemen. Book stores, photo shops, travel agents, stock brokers, bank tellers and music stores are just a few examples of the kinds of middlemen who have been eliminated by their online counterparts. The act of buying books, printing photos or booking flights online alleviates the friction felt by consumers who must stand in line or wait on hold to speak to a customer service representative. Rather than negatively describing this evolution as disintermediation or taking something away, I believe there is value in recognizing that the internet is constantly improving customer experiences by reducing friction from systems — a process I like to…

Read More →

Think beyond with Acquia Labs

For most of the history of the web, the website has been the primary means of consuming content. These days, however, with the introduction of new channels each day, the website is increasingly the bare minimum. Digital experiences can mean anything from connected Internet of Things (IoT) devices, smartphones, chatbots, augmented and virtual reality headsets, and even so-called zero user interfaces which lack the traditional interaction patterns we’re used to. More and more, brands are trying to reach customers through browserless experiences and push-, not pull-based, content — often by not accessing the website at all. Last year, we launched a new initiative called Acquia Labs, our research and innovation lab, part of the Office of the CTO. Acquia Labs aims to link together the new realities in our market, our customers’ needs in coming years, and the goals of Acquia’s products and open-source efforts in the long term. In…

Read More →

4 Things You Should Know Before You Start Using Memes on Social Media

Memes are one of the greatest symbols of social media. They’re edgy. They’re funny. They’re easy to iterate on, and every week, a new one pops up. But despite their popularity, it seems like using memes is a risky decision for a brand — or is it? Memes can work well for brands, but only for those that get the essential elements of using a meme right. If you try to use a meme and don’t hit the mark, you’ll look foolish and out of touch at best, but could also end up seriously offending someone. So whether you’re new to memes, or looking to spin your meme mastery into good business, this guide will help you nail marketing with memes. Their simple form and humor give memes inherent virility and a broad appeal. If you’ve been thinking about using memes to promote your brand on social media, you’re in…

Read More →

The Issue with Preprocessing CSS Custom Properties

CSS has Custom Properties now. We’ve written about them a bunch lately. Browser support is good, but of course, old non-evergreen browsers like Internet Explorer don’t have them and never will. I can see the appeal of authoring with “future CSS”, and letting a preprocessor backport it to CSS that is compatible with older browsers. Babel for CSS! Why not?! It makes me nervous though – because it’s only some use cases of Custom Properties that you can preprocess. There are plenty of situations where what you are doing with a Custom Property just isn’t possible to preprocesses. So if you do, you’re putting yourself in a pretty weird situation. If you’re in a situation where you can preprocess them and get what you expect, you probably should have just used preprocessor variables. Preprocessors can’t understand the DOM structure It isn’t until “runtime” when a complete DOM is constructed that…

Read More →

The Next Real Estate Frontier: Relieving Buyer Anxiety

Few life events bring such trepidation, anxiety, and stress than purchasing a home. The process is complex and littered with vocabulary and legalese that makes even the most intelligent person feel like a child. From the perspective of the buyer, the process seems to be an endless stream of disjointed tasks, many of which have potential to derail the entire purchase. Add the financial implications and fear brought on by the previous housing crash, and it’s easy to see why buyers are waiting longer than previous generations to purchase a home. OBSERVATIONS FROM 2007-PRESENT I am currently in the midst of my second home purchase, and I can attest that many of these same feelings still exist despite having some knowledge of what to expect. And while technology played a bigger role this time in our home search, little progress has been made to assuage the feelings described above. By…

Read More →

A Month without Twitter

Just over a month ago I finally, permanently, quit twitter. And ohhhhh emmmmm ggggggggeeeee… it’s been #!$!#@ fantastic. I share a few more thoughts via my vlog yesterday: I think the most important thing that I’ve come away with is the powerful reminder that these tools that we use, every single day, come and go and our ability to make clear and coherent decisions around them based on value is easier said than done. We stick around older networks and use older technologies for a lot of different reasons and we justify our reasons of sticking with them really, really well. And we often convince ourselves foolishly, falling into the “sunk cost fallacy” telling ourselves that we’ve invested so much time and energy and money and resources that we couldn’t possibly leave them now! But that’s bogus and childish. It also limits our ability to engage with bigger and more exciting opportunities.…

Read More →

Back to Top