Posts Tagged:drupal development austin

rfp-robotRFP ROBOT: Website Request for Proposal Generator

The time has come for a new website (or website redesign), which means you need to write a website request for proposal or web RFP. A Google search produces a few examples, but they vary wildly and don’t seem to speak really to your goals for developing or redesigning a new website. You need to write a website RFP that will clearly articulate your needs and generate responses from the best website designers and developers out there. But how?

Have no fear, RFP Robot is here. He will walk you through a step-by-step process to help you work through the details of your project and create a PDF formatted website design RFP that will provide the information vendors need to write an accurate bid. RFP Robot will tell you what info you should include, point out pitfalls, and give examples.


The OSTraining Podcast #1: David Bisset and WordCamp Miami

In the first episode of the OSTraining podcast I talk with David Bisset of WordCamp Miami. David runs one of the most popular WordCamps in the world. WordCamp Miami is going into it’s 10th year and attracts over 800 attendees. David talks about how he grew WordCamp Miami, how it impacted his career, and what his team is planning for the event’s annniversary year. In addition to running a great event, David’s an excellent follow on Twitter. [[ This is a content summary only. Visit http://OSTraining.com for full links, other content, and more! ]] Source: https://www.ostraining.com/

Say Hello to the OSTraining Podcast

I’ve had the pleasure of being in the open source world for around 15 years and meeting some incredible people. Today is the debut of the OSTraining Podcast (subscribe here on iTunes). I’m opening my book of contacts and chatting with fascinating people across the open source world. The focus is on how people’s careers change, mutate and lead them to places they never expected. Many of the guests started their careers a million miles away from the tech world, and almost accidentally become experts in WordPress, Drupal, and other open source platforms. [[ This is a content summary only. Visit http://OSTraining.com for full links, other content, and more! ]] Source: https://www.ostraining.com/

Podcast: Revisionist History

I’m currently grinding through Malcolm Gladwell’s podcast, Revisionist History and I particularly enjoy the way that he works his way through a number of different topics and forces you to reconsider and reevaluate them with a fresh perspective. Every single episode elicits a few head-nods and a few “ah-ha’s” and I really love that. He’s into Season 2 now and I’m working my way through the first before starting no the second. If you’ve got some extra time on your hands or want something fascinating to run in the background as you work, I can’t recommend highly enough Revisionist History. Give it a listen. You can hear it directly on the website or through iTunes. The post Podcast: Revisionist History appeared first on John Saddington. Source: https://john.do/

Creating a Design System Process with UXPin

There’s never a better time to work in software. Developers and designers are among the most desired people on the market. Companies all over the world seem to have a never-ending thirst for software experts. In 2003 the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics estimated the number of software engineers working in the US to be 677,900 people. In 2016, this number increased over 5× to 3,870,000. At the same time, design teams grew faster than software development. In the last 5 years, the design-developer ratio increased by an average of 2.5×. These changes put enormous pressure on designers and developers to take on more projects while delivering higher quality faster. But the challenge is that software development doesn’t scale easily. Scaling through hiring, without first putting standards in place, doesn’t usually end well. With every new hire, the technical and design debt increases. New ideas for color palettes, typography, patterns,…

Read More →

A Complete Local SEO Checklist by @MaddyOsman

This complete local SEO checklist will help you optimize your website, reach more local customers, and bring in more revenue.The post A Complete Local SEO Checklist by @MaddyOsman appeared first on Search Engine Journal. Source: https://www.searchenginejournal.com/feed/

Server-Side React Rendering

React is best known as a client-side JavaScript framework, but did you know you can (and perhaps should!) render React server-side? Suppose you’ve built a zippy new event listing React app for a client. The app is hooked up to an API built with your favorite server-side tool. A couple weeks later the client tells you that their pages aren’t showing up on Google and don’t look good when posted to Facebook. Seems solvable, right? You figure out that to solve this you’ll need to render your React pages from the server on initial load so that crawlers from search engines and social media sites can read your markup. There is evidence showing that Google sometimes executes javascript and can index the generated content, but not always. So server-side rendering is always recommended if you want to ensure good SEO and compatibility with other services like Facebook, Twitter. In this…

Read More →

Powerful Strategies To Connect Your Website To Social Media

The key to standing out and succeeding over your competitors is by increasing your online presence. Most businesses take advantage of social media because it has become one of the useful and most powerful tools to let people know about your company, products and services. A website that is prominently visible on search engines makes it easier to connect with potential consumers, thereby leading to a positive impact towards the business. What causes websites to rank higher than the rest depends on search engine optimization (SEO), although its main driving force is high quality content. On top of these, you need to connect your website to social channels. In this article, I will share with you some tips and techniques to maximize social media for your website. The Importance of Social Media Social media has become a part of any online business. At least 97% of marketers are currently participating…

Read More →

Drupal Developer – IQ Solutions – Remote

The Drupal Developer creates applications; Experience in Drupal site building, module development and Drupal theming equivalent to an Acquia Grand Master…From IQ Solutions – Thu, 22 Jun 2017 03:28:32 GMT – View all Remote jobs Source: http://rss.indeed.com/rss?q=Drupal+Developer

Mozilla: Web Literacy

This is really neat: A framework for entry-level web literacy & 21st Century skills. Time to level-up a bit. I think it’s pretty clear that the future of work at a macro and micro level will require an ever-growing bench of technical skills. Now, to be clear, I don’t think this means that you necessarily have to become a software developer or code full-time. This is the difference between literacy and fluency, which I’ve spoken about before. This is the difference between knowing how to “read and write” and being a professional writer. Everyone needs to know the former while not everyone needs to do it professionally. Get it done. The post Mozilla: Web Literacy appeared first on John Saddington. Source: https://john.do/

Naming Things is Only Getting Harder

I was working with CSS Grid and came to the grid-column and grid-row properties. I paused for a moment. They’re not overly complicated. They are shorthand properties for expressing where an element should start and end on a grids defined columns and rows. What caught me was the fact that I can name these lines. It’s not a requirement (you can use numbers), but the ability to name the grid lines is something we can do here. In fact, naming lines can open up neat CSS tricks. Grid lines are another item in a long list of examples where front end developers have the power to name things. Class names and IDs have always been things we need to name in CSS, but consider a few of the more historically recent things where naming is important when it comes to styling: Variables: Naming values for context, such as re-usable colors…

Read More →

How to Build Your Own Alexa Service

With the recent introduction of Amazon and Google products that provide Ironman-esque voice control functionality, we’ve been wondering lately what this means for the future of human computer interactions. Always on the lookout for emerging technology to get ahead of, we decided to put a project together to see what these little devices are capable of. We had about 2 weeks before the three Viget offices were assembling for an all hands gathering, so we wanted to something both fun and interactive. What we ended up with was an Alexa service that could figure out which Viget employee you were thinking about. We called it: The Know It All Trying out our latest Viget team game using voice control. Can you guess who? More updates soon! cc @alexadevs @amazonecho #Alexa pic.twitter.com/M1YgCh3obj— Viget (@viget) June 13, 2017 There are a couple pieces to this puzzle – a Rails backend, a React…

Read More →

Copywriting Q&A: How to Get More Work From Past Clients

Most copywriters work hard to get their clients. But when the project is over, they let those same valuable clients disappear, never reaching out to them again. Today, we’re going to talk about a strategy to get more work from previous clients. Read on… Today’s question from Molly W., who asks, “I finished up some projects with clients I really, really liked. Do you have any ideas for ways to get more work with them, either now or later on?” One-and-done is never a great strategy for a business, but it’s one that many copywriters adopt. Does this sound like you? You land a client, you do the work, you do the revisions, you send the invoice…and you never talk to them again. Or you do—but only if they reach out to you later. It’s both faster and easier to get more work from previous clients than it is to…

Read More →

Zero Talent

I saw this shared randomly on the interwebs sometime ago and I thought I’d capture it here and add a few wandering thoughts related to hiring. So, here you go: 10 Things That Require Zero Talent: Being on time Work ethic Effort Body language Energy Attitude Passion Being coachable Going the extra mile Being prepared I’ve reprinted it without change from the original image that I saw. I agree on most of these things, by the way. Strangely, many of us forget how important these things are, especially when we’re hiring folks. Instead, we look for very specific technical skills or expertise, things that we can easily count or measure or qualify as true. But how do you “test” for attitude? How do you qualify someone being truly coachable? Those things are hard to measure and certainly hard to qualify. But they are more important than any particular skill or experience…

Read More →

Drupal Architect/SME position is open

New Carrollton, MD, United States Source: https://jobs.drupal.org/all-jobs/feed

New Class: The Wright Framework for Joomla Templates

Wright is bootstrapped, responsive and lightweight. It’s the best Joomla framework you’ll find anywhere. In this week’s class, “The Wright Framework for Joomla templates”, you’ll learn how to use Wright to quickly create your own custom Joomla templates. Simon Kloostra shows you how to install Wright and use Wright’s default styles to quickly set up your template. You’ll learn how Wright provides you with many of the Bootstrap’s key features and components. You’ll also be able to safely customize your template using custom CSS and PHP files that won’t be overrridden during any updates. [[ This is a content summary only. Visit http://OSTraining.com for full links, other content, and more! ]] Source: https://www.ostraining.com/

What Does a Well-Documented CSS Codebase Look Like?

In the front-end community, there is a lot of attention related to documenting JavaScript. That’s not so much the case with CSS. Often times I feel like lost when I join a project with minimal or no CSS documentation. Even though CSS is relatively easy to write, it can be quite hard to maintain. The specificity, the global scope of everything, and the lack of guidance can easily lead to inconsistency, code duplication, and over-complication. I’ve long been curious what a really well-documented CSS codebase looks like. Here, I’ll share my experience, along with the expectations I have towards my vision of well-documented stylesheets. It surprises me where I hear people say that commenting CSS is not that important. I imagine none of them have had to deal with 10,000+ line stylesheets! Often I’ve struggled with what HTML results in what specific style. Without having a solid context about the…

Read More →

Connect: behind the front-end experience

Some fantastic behind-the-scenes stuff about Stripe’s design work by Benjamin De Cock. Absolutely everything is clever and using very modern techniques. Using CSS grid for their iconic background stripes Using 3D cubes for aesthetic flair Using reduced motion media queries to accommodate that preference Using the Web Animation API for event-triggered keyframe-like animations in JavaScript Plus one I’d never seen before: Connect’s landing page uses the new Intersection Observer API which provides a much more robust and performant way to detect the visibility of an element … The observeScroll helper simplifies our detection behavior (i.e. when an element is fully visible, the callback is triggered once) without executing anything on the main thread. Direct Link to Article — Permalink Connect: behind the front-end experience is a post from CSS-Tricks Source: CssTricks

ProxySQL as a Failover Option for Drupal – A Report from Percona Live 2017

One of the more interesting products to hit the spotlight at this year’s Percona Live Open Source Database conference was ProxySQL. This open source MySQL proxy server has been around for a couple of years now and keeps adding more features. The current release (1.3.6) has the usual features that you would expect from a proxy server, like load balancing and failover support, but ProxySQL also has database specific features like a query cache and query routing. The query cache is a scaling feature that serves data at the proxy layer to avoid contacting the database at all. This feature has become very relevant now that Oracle has announced that they’re most likely going to remove the query cache from MySQL in MySQL 8.0. Query routing can map query types to specific servers for very specific forms of load-balancing and read/write splitting. Other interesting of features of ProxySQL that are…

Read More →

Percona Live 2017 Blog Post: ProxySQL as a Failover Option for Drupal

One of the more interesting products to hit the spotlight at this year’s Percona Live Open Source Database conference was ProxySQL. This open source MySQL proxy server has been around for a couple of years now and keeps adding more features. The current release (1.3.6) has the usual features that you would expect from a proxy server, like load balancing and failover support, but ProxySQL also has database specific features like a query cache and query routing. The query cache is a scaling feature that serves data at the proxy layer to avoid contacting the database at all. This feature has become very relevant now that Oracle has announced that they’re most likely going to remove the query cache from MySQL in MySQL 8.0. Query routing can map query types to specific servers for very specific forms of load-balancing and read/write splitting. Other interesting of features of ProxySQL that are…

Read More →

Back to Top