Posts Tagged:developers

rfp-robotRFP ROBOT: Website Request for Proposal Generator

The time has come for a new website (or website redesign), which means you need to write a website request for proposal or web RFP. A Google search produces a few examples, but they vary wildly and don’t seem to speak really to your goals for developing or redesigning a new website. You need to write a website RFP that will clearly articulate your needs and generate responses from the best website designers and developers out there. But how?

Have no fear, RFP Robot is here. He will walk you through a step-by-step process to help you work through the details of your project and create a PDF formatted website design RFP that will provide the information vendors need to write an accurate bid. RFP Robot will tell you what info you should include, point out pitfalls, and give examples.


web developers West Valley City UT

Pixeldust offers consulting services for specifications, strategy, prototyping, website audits, project management, and development.

Decoupling in Drupal: All the Questions You Have, Answered by the Internet

I’ve been interested for some time in this whole idea of decoupling Drupal and decoupled architectures: collecting links, ideas, videos, and anything that I considered useful. Here is my list. I hope you find something useful, maybe not :-). Question: Decoupling Drupal… Wait, What? Why? When? In a few words, decoupling is good because: It unleashes cutting edge front-end technologies. This is important because these front-end technologies are constantly accelerating — CMS’s can’t keep pace. There is also lots of front-end work that does not necessarily need to change when upgrading a CMS. Which all adds up to: less friction between front end and back end. Question: What is all this hype about? Everyone seems to be talking decoupling, but what is this really about? Ok, here is a quick introduction to decoupling: https://www.acquia.com/drupal/decoupled-drupal Here’s another one: Decoupling explained: https://drupalize.me/tutorial/decoupling-explained?p=2360 What is decoupling? According to Dries (from 2018): https://dri.es/how-to-decouple-drupal-in-2018 Let’s…

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web developers North Las Vegas NV

Pixeldust offers consulting services for specifications, strategy, prototyping, website audits, project management, and development.

Global Training Day & First time Sprinters workshop

Start:  2018-12-08 10:00 – 17:00 Asia/Tokyo Event type:  Training (free or commercial) http://cmslabo.org/drupal-global-training-days/2018/1208 Global Training Day and First time Sprinters workshop Dec.8, 2018 Tokyo Course info 1) Global Training Drupal 8 for beginners, from install to new design template install…. install to PC how to create and edit page, menu, content type… manage admin pages install useful modules, for example, IMCE, admin menu, webform… manage design functions and change design template how to use drupal.org site resources and community 2) First time Sprinters workshop How to join Drupal developers community and contribute Drupal core, module, template, documentation, and on. Download docker based Sprint package data from https://github.com/drud/quicksprint/releases See you GTD Tokyo Japan and twitter #DrupalGTD Source: https://groups.drupal.org/node/512931/feed

Using Feature Detection, Conditionals, and Groups with Selectors

CSS is designed in a way that allows for relatively seamless addition of new features. Since the dawn of the language, specifications have required browsers to gracefully ignore any properties, values, selectors, or at-rules they do not support. Consequently, in most cases, it is possible to successfully use a newer technology without causing any issues in older browsers. Consider the relatively new caret-color property (it changes the color of the cursor in inputs). Its support is still low but that does not mean that we should not use it today. .myInput { color: blue; caret-color: red; } Notice how we put it right next to color, a property with practically universal browser support; one that will be applied everywhere. In this case, we have not explicitly discriminated between modern and older browsers. Instead, we just rely on the older ones ignoring features they do not support. It turns out that…

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GraphQL in Drupal: An Exclusive Excerpt from the Forthcoming Book, Decoupled Drupal in Practice

Over the last few years, I have had the privilege of sharing insights and tutorials on decoupled Drupal, which was originally unknown territory with shifting sands but today is a widely adopted approach, including by some of Acquia’s most influential customers. Nonetheless, the relative unavailability of developer-focused resources that are both authoritative and current has hindered architects’ and developers’ ability to evaluate and explore decoupled Drupal for themselves. Luckily, next month, my new book Decoupled Drupal in Practice will be officially on the market. With a foreword by Acquia CTO and co-founder and Drupal project lead Dries Buytaert, it is the first and only holistic guide available for developers interested in architecting and implementing decoupled Drupal across the stack. You can now preorder Decoupled Drupal in Practice on Amazon and on Apress, and it is an absolute necessity for any Drupal developer investigating decoupled Drupal. Wherever on the stack you…

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Getting Started with Vue Plugins

In the last months, I’ve learned a lot about Vue. From building SEO-friendly SPAs to crafting killer blogs or playing with transitions and animations, I’ve experimented with the framework thoroughly. But there’s been a missing piece throughout my learning: plugins. Most folks working with Vue have either comes to rely on plugins as part of their workflow or will certainly cross paths with plugins somewhere down the road. Whatever the case, they’re a great way to leverage existing code without having to constantly write from scratch. Many of you have likely used jQuery and are accustomed to using (or making!) plugins to create anything from carousels and modals to responsive videos and type. We’re basically talking about the same thing here with Vue plugins. So, you want to make one? I’m going to assume you’re nodding your head so we can get our hands dirty together with a step-by-step guide…

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The Way We Talk About CSS

There’s a ton of very quotable stuff from Rachel Andrew’s latest post all about CSS and how we talk about it in the community: CSS has been seen as this fragile language that we stumble around, trying things out and seeing what works. In particular for layout, rather than using the system as specified, we have so often exploited things about the language in order to achieve far more complex layouts than it was ever designed for. We had to, or resign ourselves to very simple looking web pages. Rachel goes on to argue that we probably shouldn’t disparage CSS for being so weird when there are very good reasons for why and how it works — not to mention that it’s getting exponentially more predictable and powerful as time goes by: There is frequently talk about how developers whose main area of expertise is CSS feel that their skills…

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Styling the Gutenberg Columns Block

WordPress 5.0 is quickly approaching, and the new Gutenberg editor is coming with it. There’s been a lot of discussion in the WordPress community over what exactly that means for users, designers, and developers. And while Gutenberg is sure to improve the writing experience, it can cause a bit of a headache for developers who now need to ensure their plugins and themes are updated and compatible. One of the clearest ways you can make sure your theme is compatible with WordPress 5.0 and Gutenberg is to add some basic styles for the new blocks Gutenberg introduces. Aside from the basic HTML blocks (like paragraphs, headings, lists, and images) that likely already have styles, you’ll now have some complex blocks that you probably haven’t accounted for, like pull quotes, cover images, buttons, and columns. In this article, we’re going to take a look at some styling conventions for Gutenberg blocks,…

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From a world wide web to a personal web

Last week, I had a chance to meet with Inrupt, a startup founded by Sir Tim Berners-Lee, who is best known as the inventor of the World Wide Web. Inrupt is based in Boston, so their team stopped by the Acquia office to talk about the new company. To learn more about Inrupt’s founding, I recommend reading Tim Berners-Lee’s blog or Inrupt’s CEO John Bruce’s announcement. Inrupt is on an important mission Inrupt’s mission is to give individuals control over their own data. Today, a handful of large platform companies (such as Facebook) control the media and flow of information for a majority of internet users. These companies have profited from centralizing the Open Web and lack transparent data privacy policies on top of that. Inrupt’s goal is not only to improve privacy and data ownership, but to take back power from these large platform companies. Inrupt will leverage Solid,…

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The next big jump in Basecamp accessibility!

How we made the Basecamp 3 Jump Menu accessibleThe Basecamp 3 Jump MenuEarlier this year I wrote about How we stopped making excuses and started improving Basecamp’s accessibility. Accessibility improvements in Basecamp 3 have come in two ways: All new features we’ve shipped over the past year and a half have been designed and tested to meet WCAG AA guidelines (The Web Content Accessibility Guidelines, or WCAG, provides a shared standard that web developers can follow to make sure their products are accessible).At the same time, we’ve gone back and retrofitted existing features and interactions for better accessibility. Today I’m excited to announce that we just completed some significant improvements to the Basecamp 3 Jump Menu!The jump menu has always been the quickest way for getting to a person, project, recently visited page, and My assignments/bookmarks/schedule /drafts/latest activity. Here’s a look at it in action:Note the small-ish “Press ⌘+J to show the menu” labelIn…

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Manager, Marketing Automation Systems – Tableau – Seattle, WA

In addition, this role works closely with marketing operations program teams, website developers, and business systems….From Tableau – Thu, 04 Oct 2018 00:03:55 GMT – View all Seattle, WA jobs Source: http://rss.indeed.com/rss?q=Drupal+Developer

Manager, Marketing Operations – Tableau – Seattle, WA

In addition, this role works closely with marketing operations program teams, website developers, and business systems….From Tableau – Thu, 04 Oct 2018 00:03:55 GMT – View all Seattle, WA jobs Source: http://rss.indeed.com/rss?q=Drupal+Developer

Experience Express in Darmstadt: Celebrating Drupal 8's Most Important Release Yet

Though there was no DrupalCon Europe this year, the European Drupal community stepped up and organized their own conference, Drupal Europe, in Darmstadt, Germany last month. An incredibly successful gathering held in the Darmstadtium venue, a beautiful convention center in the center of this college town, Drupal Europe demonstrated the unique power that grassroots initiatives can have in our open-source community. Drupal Europe came at a particularly important time in the Drupal community as we welcomed the latest and most important release in Drupal 8’s history, with exciting new features such as embedded media support (such as YouTube videos), support for file uploads via REST, and substantial improvements in many other areas. At the same time, as Dries Buytaert said during his keynote, it is now time for the community to begin considering how Drupal 9, which will be released in 2020, will look. Because it was an intensely busy…

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The Codification of Design

Jonathan Snook on managing the complexity between what designers make and what developers end up building: Everything that a designer draws in a Sketch or Photoshop file needs to be turned into code. Code needs to be developed, delivered to the user, and maintained by the team. That means that complexity in design can lead to complexity in code. That’s not to say that complexity isn’t allowed. However, it is important to consider what the impact of that complexity is—especially as it relates to your codebase. Jonathan continues in that post to argue that designers and developers need to be in a constant feedback loop in order to properly assess whether the complexity of the design is worth the complexity of the engineering solution. I’ve been thinking about this sort of thing for a really long time as it applies to my work in design systems — I have a…

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Selectors That Depend on Layout

“Why the heck don’t we have ::first-column?” I heard someone ask that the other day and it’s a valid question. I’d even take that question further by asking about ::nth-column() or whatever else relates to CSS columns. We have stuff like ::first-letter and ::first-line. Why not others? There are many notable things missing from the “nth” crowd. Seven years ago, I wrote “A Call for ::nth-everything” and it included clear use cases like, perhaps, selecting the first two lines of a paragraph. I don’t know all the technical details of it all, but I know there are some fairly decent reasons why we don’t have all of these in CSS. Part of it is the difficulty of getting it specced (e.g. words and characters get tricky across written languages) and part of it is the difficulty of implementing them. What I just found out is that there is a FAQ…

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Netlify

(This is a sponsored post.)It’s always fun to watch developers discover Netlify for the first time. It’s so easy. One way to do it is to just literally drag and drop a folder onto them and it will be online. Even better, connect a Git repo to a Netlify site and tell it what branch you want to watch, then any commits to that branch will automatically go live, even running your site’s build as it does it. I heard one developer say, “It’s like someone actually designed hosting and deployment.” That lends itself nicely to static sites, but don’t think that static sites are only for certain types of sites or limiting in some way. That’s what the JAMstack is all about! Wanna learn more about that? Come to JAMstack_conf! Netlify does a ton to help you power your JAMstack site as well. They’ll process your forms. They’ll help…

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Test out the cloud platform developers love for free with a $100 credit

(This is a sponsored post.)DigitalOcean invites you to experience a better, faster and simpler cloud platform designed to scale based on your needs. Get started for free with a $100 credit toward your first project and discover why the most innovative companies are already hosting on DigitalOcean. Direct Link to Article — PermalinkThe post Test out the cloud platform developers love for free with a $100 credit appeared first on CSS-Tricks. Source: CssTricks

A Minimal JavaScript Setup

Some people prefer to write JavaScript with React. For others, it’s Vue or jQuery. For others still, it is their own set of tools or a completely blank document. Some setups are minimal, some allow you to get things done quickly, and some are crazy powerful, allowing you to build complex and maintainable applications. Every setup has advantages and disadvantages, but positives usually outweigh negatives when it comes to popular frameworks verified and vetted by an active community. React and Vue are powerful JavaScript frameworks. Of course they are — that’s why both are trending so high in overall usage. But what is it that makes those, and other frameworks, so powerful? Is it the speed? Portability to other platforms like native desktop and mobile? Support of the huge community? The success of a development team starts with an agreement. An agreement of how things are done. Without an agreement,…

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