Posts Tagged:Design

rfp-robotRFP ROBOT: Website Request for Proposal Generator

The time has come for a new website (or website redesign), which means you need to write a website request for proposal or web RFP. A Google search produces a few examples, but they vary wildly and don’t seem to speak really to your goals for developing or redesigning a new website. You need to write a website RFP that will clearly articulate your needs and generate responses from the best website designers and developers out there. But how?

Have no fear, RFP Robot is here. He will walk you through a step-by-step process to help you work through the details of your project and create a PDF formatted website design RFP that will provide the information vendors need to write an accurate bid. RFP Robot will tell you what info you should include, point out pitfalls, and give examples.


More Unicode Patterns

Creating is the most intense excitement one can come to know. —Anni Albers, On Designing I recently wrote a post — that was shared here on CSS-Tricks — where I looked at ways to use Unicode characters to create interesting (and random) patterns. Since then, I’ve continued to seek new characters to build new patterns. I even borrowed a book about Unicode from a local library. (That’s a really thick book, by the way.) It’s all up to your imagination to see the possible patterns a Unicode character can make. Although not all characters are good as patterns, the process is a good exercise for me. And, aside from Unicode itself, the methods to build the patterns may not be so obvious. It usually takes a lot of inspiration and trial and error to come up with new ones. More tiling There are actually many ways to do tiling. Here’s…

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Your Brain on Front-End Development

Part of the job of being a front-end developer is applying different techniques and technologies to pull of the desired UI and UX. Perhaps you work with a design team and implement their designs. I know when I look at a design (heck, even if I know I’m not going to be building it), my front-end brain starts triggering all sorts of things I know will be related to the task. Let’s take a look at what I mean. Check out this lovely Dribbble shot for a Food Recipe Website from Riko Sapto Dimo. It’s a very appealing design, and there is loads in there to think about from a front-end web design and development standpoint. We’re going to mostly be talking about design pattern choices and HTML/CSS tech choices. There is much more to the job of front-end development. Accessibility! Performance! Semantics! Design systems! All important stuff as well.…

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3 Super Useful Color Tools for UI Design

In 2014, I wrote a series of articles to showcase various ways I go about using color in my design work. The series garnered some interest, particularly the Color Contrast and Visual Loudness posts. Fast forward to 2018, my methodologies are still largely the same. What has changed, however, are some of the tools that I’m using. I thought it might be useful to highlight a few that have been giving me the most value as of late. Color Ranges with Palx In my Shades of Gray, Tints, Tones, and Shades, and Color Mixing posts, I talked about how I like to create a wide range of colors to start with. One thing I really love to do is to create a range of grays (or neutrals). This is particularly useful when establishing colors for text. Additionally, I love to add a hint of a color to warm or cool the gray so that I’m creating…

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Videos to Get You Started With WordPress Theme Design

How do I get started with theme design? That’s a common question we get from people who join OSTraining for the first time. They want to know about the skills they will need, and what kind of classes they should take. Here’s an overview of everything you need to get started with WordPress theme design. [[ This is a content summary only. Visit http://OSTraining.com for full links, other content, and more! ]] Source: https://www.ostraining.com/

Creating a Bar Graph with CSS Grid

If you’re looking for more manageable ways to create bar graphs, or in search of use cases to practice CSS Grid layout, I got you! Before we begin working on the graph, I want to talk about coding the bars, when Grid is a good approach for graphs, and we’ll also cover some code choices you might consider before getting started. Preface The bar is a pretty basic shape: you can control its dimensions with CSS width, height, number of grid or table cells, etc. depending on how you’ve coded it. As far as graphs go, the main thing we want to control is the height of the bars in the graph. Controlling height with Grid cells (like here) is convenient for designs where the height is incremental by a fixed value — no in-betweens. For example, signal bars in phones or when you don’t mind setting a lot of…

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AIGA 50 Winners

Viget is honored to be recognized among the winners of AIGA DC’s biennial design competition and exhibition. The AIGA 50 judges selected our work for ESPN’s LeBron’s Journey and the Ad Council & AARP’s Ace Your Retirement among the Washington D.C. area’s best 50 pieces across all categories from the past two years. Here’s a little more about Viget’s winning entries: LeBron’s Journey When you’re ESPN, and LeBron James becomes one of the Top-10 points leaders in NBA history, you’re going to have something to say about it. To mark the event, we began collaborating with ESPN’s editorial team to design something unique. We knew we needed to capture the drama of the accomplishment and highlight the stats that underscored its significance. The interactive experience we created lets fans track LeBron’s journey from draft day to present day, and offers some predictions about what it will take to become the greatest…

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New in Basecamp: See where projects really stand with the Hill Chart

For years we’ve used Basecamp To-Dos to track all of our design and programming work here at Basecamp. They help us make sure that nothing slips through the cracks.However, for some projects, tracking to-dos isn’t enough. When you have dozens or hundreds of tasks, you need a way to see the bigger picture. Is the project going to be done on time? Are we making progress on the right tasks? Which things need to be solved now and what can be deferred until later?To solve this problem, we built an entirely new idea into Basecamp To-Dos. It’s a 10,000-foot view of our projects that answers the hard questions about where things really stand.Introducing the Hill Chart.Progress is not a number“42% of the tasks are complete.” What does that tell you? Very little.For creative work and software projects, you can’t describe progress with a number. Why not? Because tasks on a project aren’t all the same. If…

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World wide wrist

After all the hubbub with WWDC over the past couple of days, Ethan Marcotte is excited about the news that the Apple Watch will be able to view web content. He writes: If I had to guess, I’d imagine some sort of “reader mode” is coming to the Watch: in other words, when you open a link on your Watch, this minified version of WebKit wouldn’t act like a full browser. Instead of rendering all your scripts, styles, and layout, mini-WebKit would present a stripped-down version of your web page. If that’s the case, then Jen Simmons’s suggestion is spot-on: it just got a lot more important to design from a sensible, small screen-friendly document structure built atop semantic HTML. But who knows! I could be wrong! Maybe it’s a more capable browser than I’m assuming, and we’ll start talking about best practices for layout, typography, and design on watches.…

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Consultant Drupal Developer, Digital Health – PATH – Seattle, WA

The OPP is built in the coding language Drupal. Demonstrated experience with Drupal, PHP, Perl, MySQL, PostgreSQL, relational database design, web application…From PATH – Thu, 07 Jun 2018 05:37:43 GMT – View all Seattle, WA jobs Source: http://rss.indeed.com/rss?q=Drupal+Developer

The web can be anything we want it to be

I really enjoyed this chat between Bruce Lawson and Mustafa Kurtuldu where they talked about browser support and the health of the web. Bruce expands upon a lot of the thoughts in a post he wrote last year called World Wide Web, Not Wealthy Western Web where he writes: …across the world, regardless of disposable income, regardless of hardware or network speed, people want to consume the same kinds of goods and services. And if your websites are made for the whole world, not just the wealthy Western world, then the next 4 billion people might consume the stuff that your organization makes. Another highlight is where Bruce also mentions that, as web developers, we might think that we’ve all moved on from jQuery as a community, and yet there are still millions of websites that depend upon jQuery to function properly. It’s an interesting anecdote and relevant to recent…

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The OSTraining Podcast #23: Jen Kramer, Harvard, and Bootstrap 4

Jen Kramer describes herself as “Web Design Teacher” but that barely scratches the surface of what she does. She’s a speaker, a teacher, a writer, a video trainer, and much more besides. Jen currently teaches web design at Harvard Extension School. In this episode, I talk with Jen about teaching web design at Harvard and her upcoming videos for OSTraining. Jen is creating a video series and book all about Bootstrap 4. [[ This is a content summary only. Visit http://OSTraining.com for full links, other content, and more! ]] Source: https://www.ostraining.com/

Combining the Powers of SEM and BIO for Improving CSS

CSS is easy, some might argue, but that “easiness” can cause messy code. This is especially true through power of preprocessors like Sass or Less where, if you aren’t careful, your CSS can become harder to deal with instead of easier. Sass? Harder? This Gist shows a great example of Sass nesting hell. If your Sass code looks like that, you can definitely improve your code with SEM & BIO, a CSS technique I’ll introduce you to now! In this article, I am going to use the code example below to explain how SEM and BIO works and how they can help enhance your CSS strategy. See the Pen by thebabydino (@thebabydino) on CodePen. Generally, SEM is concerned with high level CSS philosophy whereas BIO is an actual technique to help you write better CSS to achieve SEM. The main purpose of both SEM and BIO is to better handle…

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Why Most Advice About How to Price Your Services is Dead Wrong for You

I was watching an online training about freelancing a few weeks ago, and something the trainer said threw up a big red flag. (By the way, sure I already knew most of what he had to say, but I’m always taking new trainings and watching webinars to pick up whatever new tactics are out there. I strongly encourage you to do the same.) Anyway, this trainer was talking about how to price your services. He asked the studio audience how much they charge and then said, essentially, “Okay now: Double it. And, once you get lots of clients at that rate, double it again.” Double it again?? Wait a minute here. As a new copywriter, if you take this advice, you will price yourself right out of business. I do agree that many service providers are undercharging for their expertise. And I do believe that you should command rates that…

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A Specification Tool for Drupal 8

Revered management thinker Peter Drucker once wrote, “If you can’t replicate something because you don’t understand it, then it really hasn’t been invented; it’s only been done.” In many ways content modeling in Drupal has been done without being invented. There is no accepted method of analysis, no common format for specification, no process for change management, no best practices for testing. Consequently outcomes are highly variable. For this reason, we’re developing a discipline for content modeling at Acquia. It’s drastically reducing both costs and defect rates for us, and we’re sharing it with you in this post. Introducing the Drupal Spec Tool The cornerstone of the discipline is something we call the Drupal Spec Tool, consisting of a spreadsheet and automated testing infrastructure. Why a Specification Tool? A standard specification format is an industry’s answer to the difficulty of validating, communicating, and conceptualizing complex solutions. Every professional domain has…

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Developing a design environment

Jules Forrest discusses some of the work that her team at Credit Karma has been up to when it comes to design systems. Jules writes: …in most engineering organizations, you spend your whole first day setting up your development environment so you can actually ship code. It’s generally pretty tedious and no one likes doing it, but it’s this thing you do to contribute meaningful work to production. Which got me thinking, what would it look like to make it easier for designers to design for production? That’s what Jules calls a “design environment” and she’s even written a whole bunch of documentation in Thread, Credit Karma’s design system, for designers on their team to get that design environment up and running. That’s stuff like fonts, Sketch plugins, and other useful assets: These problems have certainly been tackled by other teams in the past but this is the first time…

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Solving Life’s Problems with CSS

Or: When all you have is a CSS hammer, the world looks like a CSS nail. Whenever I hear a perfectly nice comment like, “Yeah, representing the tech field!” in response to my pure-CSS art, I get a sharp feeling of panic. Like many people who work on UIs for a living, I have difficulty applying the “tech” term to myself without feeling like a fraud. Impostor syndrome is a hard thing to shake. A front-end specialist? Oh, you mean the stuff that isn’t really code? That amps up the feeling from impostor to villain. Even though 90% of my daily work revolves around JavaScript, I feel as if the “tech” label is a shiny trophy that I greedily snatched from someone more deserving. As if there are nameless, starving computer science grads out there and I’m stealing the ramen right out of their mouths. Take for example this scenario…

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Learning Gutenberg: Building Our Custom Card Block

We’ve got some base knowledge, we’ve played with some React and now we’ve got our project tools set up. Let’s dive into building our custom block. Article Series: Series Introduction What is Gutenberg, Anyway? A Primer with create-guten-block Modern JavaScript Syntax React 101 Setting up a Custom webpack A Custom “Card” Block (This Post) What we’re building We’re going to build a custom card block that features an image, a title and a summary. It’s a really common design pattern in the web and it also let’s us look at some core Gutenberg components, along with core WordPress elements, such as the Media Library. We’ll also play with some display logic with JSX for the front-end markup. Our glorious custom card block! Our glorious custom card block! We’re going to focus solely on the CMS aspect of this block in this tutorial. What it renders is some nice, clean markup…

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The Top 12 WordPress Themes for Sports Websites

WordPress is the most popular blogging system in the world today. Developed by the WordPress Foundation, it was released in May 2003 to widespread acclaim. One of the key factors behind the success of WordPress is that it has a built-in template system. This allows users to easily switch between pre-made themes that change the look and feel of their website. Themes are essentially user-created templates that WordPress administrators can freely access (or purchase) for their own website. Once installed, the appearance of the website changes as the PHP, HTML, and CSS makeup of the page are reconfigured. WordPress themes make it easy to launch your own personalized website. Whether your website is all about political affairs or the latest financial market speculation, there are WordPress themes that can appeal to your target demographic. If you want to build a sports-related website, WordPress is the platform for you. With hundreds…

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