Posts Tagged:cognitive

rfp-robotRFP ROBOT: Website Request for Proposal Generator

The time has come for a new website (or website redesign), which means you need to write a website request for proposal or web RFP. A Google search produces a few examples, but they vary wildly and don’t seem to speak really to your goals for developing or redesigning a new website. You need to write a website RFP that will clearly articulate your needs and generate responses from the best website designers and developers out there. But how?

Have no fear, RFP Robot is here. He will walk you through a step-by-step process to help you work through the details of your project and create a PDF formatted website design RFP that will provide the information vendors need to write an accurate bid. RFP Robot will tell you what info you should include, point out pitfalls, and give examples.


How we made Basecamp 3’s Android app 100% Kotlin

Our best advice based on a year of real-world shipping.Made with ❤️ in Chicago.We started our Kotlin journey a year ago based on two hunches: that it would 1) make a huge difference in programmer happiness and 2) wildly improve our work quality and speed.I’m happy to report that our hunches were right! As of this week, Basecamp 3’s Android app is written in 100% Kotlin. 🎉That puts us in a unique position to share tips from the experience of going from all Java to all Kotlin. How do you get started? What should you look out for? What are the best ways to keep learning Kotlin?Read on!🤓 Wrap your head around the basicsFirst thing’s first — take some time to get acclimated with the the language. There are free resources galore, but here are a few I’d recommend:Jake Wharton’s talk about Kotlin for Android. This was the lightbulb moment for me. After two watches, I really…

Read More →

Achieve & Acquia Spark Conversation around Machine Learning and Healthcare

For more than ten years, Achieve, an Acquia partner, has been bringing innovative portal solutions to healthcare providers with a user-centered focus. They make the most complex web development projects possible for companies like Children’s Hospital Los Angeles, Universal Music Group, Dexcom, The Recording Academy, and Scripps Translational Science Institute. Achieve sought out Acquia to participate in their latest Digital Health Innovations (DHI) event because of Acquia’s involvement with technical trends like machine learning that are currently impacting the healthcare industry. Katherine Bailey, Principal Data Scientist at Acquia, was the featured speaker at the event. Like past DHI events, this one continued Achieve’s aim of bringing the San Diego tech, healthcare, and life science communities together through thought leadership. Katherine Bailey taking questions from the audience at DHI Machine Learning Today The emergence of touch points in our digital world including the Internet of Things (IoT), the multitude of devices…

Read More →

What’s Next In Tech: Takeaways from SXSW

Phase2 was in Austin last week for South By Southwest, the frenetic, ever-expanding conference celebrating the latest in technology, design, art, and entrepreneurship. We co-hosted a “Drupal Drop In” lunch with our partner, Acquia, and got a chance to speak with attendees about this year’s most popular SXSW themes. Here are a few of the highlights: AI and Machine Learning Many panels and sessions focused on the emerging applications (and moral ambiguities) of artificial intelligence, the rapidly evolving technology that underlies machine learning, deep analytics, the cognitive web, and advanced robotics. If you’ve pulled up at a stoplight next to a driverless car or been blown away by Amazon’s intuition when suggesting products, you’ve experienced AI in action. A few key takeaways: The scale and speed at which data can be mined and insights intelligently extracted is accelerating at a breakneck pace. Machine learning systems are mature enough to perform…

Read More →

How Important is Urgency in Facebook Ads?

In 2012, Marcus Taylor launched a kind of ‘Groupon deal for musicians’; for 100 hours only he gave away $1,250 worth of products for just $69. There were only 5,000 packages available. Because there was so much on the line, and he knew this would be exposed to millions, he obsessed over conversion rate. A mere 1% increase, could have been the difference between a huge loss and a decent profit. In the end, his ‘obsession’ paid off – he managed to increase his conversion rate from 2.5% to 10.8%. The single largest factor that influenced this growht, he said, was increasing the amount of scarcity and urgency. Urgency is one of the most powerful aspects of human psychology, In this article, Nail Patel explains that according to behavioral psychologists, urgent situations cause us to suspend deliberate thought and to act quickly. Many of the problems that affect conversions are issues of cognitive friction — people…

Read More →

An Introduction to the Reduced Motion Media Query

The open web’s success is built on interoperable technologies. The ability to control animation now exists alongside important features such as zooming content, installing extensions, enabling high contrast display, loading custom stylesheets, or disabling JavaScript. Sites all too often inundate their audiences with automatically playing, battery-draining, resource-hogging animations. The need for people being able to take back control of animations might be more prevalent than you may initially think. A brief history of Reduced Motion When it was released in 2013, iOS 7 featured a dramatic reworking of the operating system’s visuals. Changes included translucency and blurring, a more simplified “flat” user interface, and dramatic motion effects such as full-screen zooming and panning. While the new look was generally accepted, many people using the updated operating system reported experiencing motion sickness and vertigo. User interface movement didn’t correspond with users’ feeling of movement or spatial orientation, triggering the reported effects.…

Read More →

An Introduction to the Reduced Motion Media Query

The open web’s success is built on interoperable technologies. The ability to control animation now exists alongside important features such as zooming content, installing extensions, enabling high contrast display, loading custom stylesheets, or disabling JavaScript. Sites all too often inundate their audiences with automatically playing, battery-draining, resource-hogging animations. The need for people being able to take back control of animations might be more prevalent than you may initially think. A brief history of Reduced Motion When it was released in 2013, iOS 7 featured a dramatic reworking of the operating system’s visuals. Changes included translucency and blurring, a more simplified “flat” user interface, and dramatic motion effects such as full-screen zooming and panning. While the new look was generally accepted, many people using the updated operating system reported experiencing motion sickness and vertigo. User interface movement didn’t correspond with users’ feeling of movement or spatial orientation, triggering the reported effects.…

Read More →

Writing software is hard

Good software is uncommon because writing it is hard. In the abstract, we all know that it is hard. We talk incessantly about how it’s hard. And yet, we also collectively seem shocked — just shocked! — when the expectable happens and the software we’re exposed to or is working on turns out poor.This is classic cognitive dissonance: Accepting that writing software is hard, but expecting that all of it should be good.It’s also an application of a just-world theory of effort and accomplishment. That despite the odds, everyone who has the right intent at heart, and puts in the work, will succeed. No they won’t. That’s just delusional.And those delusions are anything but harmless. When we expect good software to be the most likely outcome from the hardship of writing it, we’re setting ourselves up for inevitable disappointment. Even worse, if we feel we deserve good software from our imperfect efforts, we’ll project the inevitable…

Read More →

Basecamp 3 just got a whole lot… simpler

In the year since we launched Basecamp 3 for iOS we’ve shipped 16 releases full of features, improvements and fixes. After all that you might be surprised that the app has gotten simpler, not the other way around.The most recent release is the biggest yet but it doesn’t include a bunch of new features. Instead, it’s a huge step forward in clarity and simplicity. While it’s nearly a complete redesign, it wasn’t planned that way. We never decided to do a “Major Redesign”, we simply started with a hunch that Basecamp could be much simpler. And then we ended up somewhere great.Here’s how we set off with a hunch and arrived somewhere entirely unexpected.It’s full of buttonsThe old Home screen on Basecamp for iOS was the core of the app, the jumping-off point for everything in your projects. It had tabs for Basecamps, Campfires, Pings, and “Hey!”. But that’s not all. It…

Read More →

Consumer Profiling Via Twitter

Yesterday, social media and marketing researcher and scientist Dan Zarrella debuted a new way to see into the minds of Twitter users with TweetPsych. Using two linguistic analysis methods, TweetPsych analyzes the content of a user’s last 1,000 tweets and builds a psychological profile based on the content.

Back to Top