Posts Tagged:Apps

rfp-robotRFP ROBOT: Website Request for Proposal Generator

The time has come for a new website (or website redesign), which means you need to write a website request for proposal or web RFP. A Google search produces a few examples, but they vary wildly and don’t seem to speak really to your goals for developing or redesigning a new website. You need to write a website RFP that will clearly articulate your needs and generate responses from the best website designers and developers out there. But how?

Have no fear, RFP Robot is here. He will walk you through a step-by-step process to help you work through the details of your project and create a PDF formatted website design RFP that will provide the information vendors need to write an accurate bid. RFP Robot will tell you what info you should include, point out pitfalls, and give examples.


What’s New in Basecamp 3.9.3 for iOS

The newest release introduces a brand new tab along with improvements to searching, navigation, and for people who have multiple accounts. Get it for iPhone and iPad in the App Store today. Read-on for details about what’s new…New Me tab!We know that My Assignments is one of the most popular screens in Basecamp on all platforms but it can be hard to find. Now My Assignments and the rest of My Stuff are easier to reach on the new Me tab. It also includes your Bookmarks and app Settings.Introdcing he brand new Me tab, a place to find all your stuff and settings.New Activity view switcherGone is the old Activity | Reports toggle. Basecamp now has a nice switcher to change between activity views more akin to web and mobile web. It’s easier to see what you’re currently looking at and you now stay on the same screen rather than navigating forward.Tap the…

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A Better Way to Reach Your Mobile Users: Introducing Progressive Web Apps

The rise of Mobile Mobile device usage is on the rise and only going to increase each year. According to a report by We Are Social, mobile devices now account for 52% of web traffic, which is a larger share of the web traffic market than traffic from all other devices combined. The desktop/laptop has been replaced by the mobile device as the primary way that users interact with the web. Source: https://www.phase2technology.com/feed/

Twitter Will Limit What Third-Party Apps Can Do, Starting August 16th by @MattGSouthern

Twitter is set to roll out policy changes on August 16th, limiting what third-party Twitter apps are capable of doing.The post Twitter Will Limit What Third-Party Apps Can Do, Starting August 16th by @MattGSouthern appeared first on Search Engine Journal. Source: https://www.searchenginejournal.com/feed/

Forms, Auth and Serverless Functions on Gatsby and Netlify

Abstracting infrastructure is in our DNA. Roads, schools, water supply networks—you get the idea. Web development is no exception: serverless architectures are a beautiful expression of that phenomenon. Static sites, in particular, are turning into dynamic, rich experiences. Handling static forms, authentication, and backend functions on statically-generated sites is now a thing. Especially with the JAMstack pioneer platform that is Netlify. Recently, they announced support of AWS Lambda functions on front-end-centric sites and apps. I’ve been meaning to dive into their “backend” features since. Today, I’m doing just that, using a static Gatsby site, Netlify’s Forms, Identity, and Functions features. This tutorial will show you how to: Add static forms to your site Add user authentication for password-protected content Create an AWS Lambda function Ready to supercharge a static site with serverless features? Consider checking out Netlify’s React-powered static CMS after this post! And here’s a tutorial on a whole…

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Learning Gutenberg: A Primer with create-guten-block

Welcome back! We’ve just taken a look at what Gutenberg is and how it operates from the admin side. Gutenberg is certainly going to have a massive impact on the WordPress world. If you are just arriving here and have no idea what we’re talking about, I recommend at least skimming Part 1 to make sure you have the appropriate background. Let’s create a custom block with a bit of help from a wonderful tool called create-guten-block. Onward! Article Series: Series Introduction What is Gutenberg, Anyway? A Primer with create-guten-block (This Post) Modern JavaScript Syntax React 101 (Coming Soon!) Setting up a Custom webpack (Coming Soon!) A Custom “Card” Block (Coming Soon!) Blocks live in plugins To create a Gutenberg block, you create a WordPress plugin. Anything that affects *content*, like a Gutenberg block certain will, needs to be a plugin so that it remains active even as you change…

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Page Transitions for Everyone

As Sarah mentioned in her previous post about page transition using Vue.js, there is plenty of motivation for designers and developers to be building page transitions. Let’s consider mobile applications. While mobile applications are evolving, more and more attention is given to the animation experience, while the web pretty much stays the same. Why is that? Maybe it’s because native app developers spend more time working on those animations. Maybe it’s because users say that’s what they want. Maybe it’s because they know more about the environment in which the app is going to run. All of that helps to improve the experience over time. Overall, it seems like mobile app developers somehow seem to know or care more about user experience. If we take a look at how mobile apps are designed today, there is very often some sort of animated transition between states. Even ready-to-use native components have…

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Server-Side Visualization With Nightmare

This is an extract from chapter 11 of Ashley Davis’s book Data Wrangling with JavaScript now available on the Manning Early Access Program. I absolutely love this idea as there is so much data visualization stuff on the web that relies on fully functioning client side JavaScript and potentially more API calls. It’s not nearly as robust, accessible, or syndicatable as it could be. If you bring that data visualization back to the server, you can bring progressive enhancement to the party. All example code and data can be found on GitHub. When doing exploratory coding or data analysis in Node.js it is very useful to be able to render a visualization from our data. If we were working in browser-based JavaScript we could choose any one of the many charting, graphics, and visualization libraries. Unfortunately, under Node.js, we don’t have any viable options, so how otherwise can we achieve…

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Native-Like Animations for Page Transitions on the Web

Some of the most inspiring examples I’ve seen of front end development have involved some sort of page transitions that look slick, like they do in mobile apps. However, even though the imagination for these types of interactions seem to abound, their presence on actual sites that I visit do not. There are a number of ways to accomplish these types of movement! Here’s what we’ll be building: Demo Site GitHub Repo We’ll build out the simplest possible distallation of these concepts so that you can apply them to any application, and then I’ll also provide the code for this more complex app if you’d like to dive in. Today we’ll be discussing how to create them with Vue and Nuxt. There are a lot of moving parts in page transitions and animations (lol I kill me), but don’t worry! Anything we don’t have time to cover in the article,…

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Conceptual compression means beginners don’t need to know SQL — hallelujah!

It used to be a fundamental requirement that you learned an extensive amount of SQL before you were able to start working on database-backed applications. It was taken as self-evident that you needed to speak the native language of the database before you were qualified to use it. And better yet, you really ought to understand and care about your particular brand of database engine.This is no longer so. That fact has snuck up upon us, but it’s none the less true — and that’s amazing.Through advances in leaky abstractions, we’ve managed to compress the conceptual overhead of the database so much that it needn’t feature in the introduction material for making database-backed applications. In Rails, we call that abstraction Active Record, and it falls into the category of object-relational mappers (ORM).The ORM was long derided by programmers as an unreliable, even harmful, aid of the lazy or the weak. Something Real Programmers shouldn’t expect…

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Introducing Boosts: an all-new way to show your support in Basecamp

We gave up on Likes and invented a totally new form of tiny communication.If there’s one thing you can’t avoid on the Internet, it’s Likes. They’re in nearly every software platform where people post photos or write text messages.Sometimes Likes are called Faves, Hearts, Reactions, Claps, or something else, but the basic idea is the same: they’re a small, quick way to express your feelings about something, usually accompanied by a count of other people who had that same feeling.Until today, we had exactly this sort of feature in Basecamp 3. We called it Applause. If you liked a post, you’d clap for it. Everyone who clapped was shown in a row.Basecamp’s applause feature.This was fine, of course—it worked just like all the other Likes.But a couple months ago, we started thinking more deeply about this pattern, and we noticed it has a lot of insidious problems.Likes are vague, especially in a professional setting.…

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It’s Time for an RSS Revival

Brian Barrett: Tired of Twitter? Facebook fatigued? It’s time to head back to RSS. I’m an RSS reader lover, so I hate to admit it, but RSS ain’t going mainstream. It was too nerdy 20 years ago and it’s too nerdy now. RSS is still incredibly useful technology, but I can’t see it taking off alone. For RSS to take off, it needs some kind of abstraction. Like Flipboard, where you can get started reading stuff right away and feeding it RSS isn’t something you need to handle manually. Apple News is kinda like that. I’m a little love/hate with Apple News though. I like reading stuff in it, but I’ve stopped publishing in it because it became too much work to get right and have it look good. It’s like managing a second site, unlike RSS which just brainlessly works when your CMS supports it. A little-known feature of…

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List Rendering and Vue’s v-for Directive

List rendering is one of the most commonly used practices in front-end web development. Dynamic list rendering is often used to present a series of similarly grouped information in a concise and friendly format to the user. In almost every web application we use, we can see lists of content in numerous areas of the app. In this article we’ll gather an understanding of Vue’s v-for directive in generating dynamic lists, as well as go through some examples of why the key attribute should be used when doing so. Since we’ll be explaining things thoroughly as we start to write code, this article assumes you’ll have no or very little knowledge with Vue (and/or other JavaScript frameworks). Case Study: Twitter We’re going to use Twitter as the case study for this article. When logged in and in the main index route of Twitter we’re presented with a view similar to…

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Going Offline

Jeremy Keith has written a new book all about service workers and offline functionality that releases at the end of the month. The first chapter is posted on A List Apart. Now that the latest versions of iOS and macOS Safari support service workers, I can’t think of a better time to learn about how progressive web apps work under the hood. In fact, here’s an example of a simple offline site and a short series on making web apps work offline. News of Jeremy’s book had me going back through his previous book, Resilient Web Design, where I half-remembered this super interesting quote from Chapter 4: If you build something using web technologies, and someone visits with a web browser, you can’t be sure how many of the web technologies will be supported. It probably won’t be 100%. But it’s also unlikely to be 0%. Some people will visit…

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Heroku + Cloudflare: The Right Way

There are dozens of articles on how to setup your Heroku app to use Cloudflare. They all leave out two crucial security steps. Encrypt and authenticate communication between Cloudflare and Heroku. The first issue pertains to selecting the SSL mode for your app in Cloudflare. The option I’ve observed most people choosing, “Flexible SSL”, means the communication between Cloudflare and Heroku is left completely insecure. Which means all those nice passwords and personal data just get to float through the internet. Securing this communication is super important (especially in this day of data breach outrage), and really easy. Choosing “Full SSL” is a decent option as it encrypts communication, but it’s still less secure than “Full (Strict)”. It will encrypt communication between Cloudflare and Heroku, but won’t perform authentication to ensure that Cloudflare is actually talking to your app. So I’d recommend always using “Full (Strict)”. Setting things up to…

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What Are Viget Developers Building Right Now?

I sat down with our Development Director, David, last week to talk about Viget’s Development team, what they are working on, and how we should grow over the next 6 months. I left the conversation inspired. The purpose of this article is to provide a snapshot of what the Viget Dev team is currently working on. Hopefully, you’ll find this list as inspiring as I did — there is a huge range of scope, duration, team size, technology, and client type. If you think you’d enjoy contributing to these types of projects, I hope you’ll consider applying to work with us or at least introducing yourself so we can keep in touch long-term. Here’s a quick rundown of the dev work we’ve done this quarter (January – March, 2018). We just started a quick, two-week project to build a small app with a React front-end and Rails back-end. It’s a fast paced,…

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Focusing on Focus Styles

Not everyone uses a mouse to browse the internet. If you’re reading this post on a smartphone, this is obvious! What’s also worth pointing out is that there are other forms of input that people use to get things done. With these forms of input comes the need for focus styles. People People are complicated. We don’t necessarily perform the same behaviors consistently, nor do we always make decisions that make sense from an outsider’s perspective. Sometimes we even do something just to… do something. We get bored easily: tinkering, poking, and prodding things to customize them to better suit our needs, regardless of their original intent. People are also mortal. We can get sick and injured. Sometimes both at once. Sometimes it’s for a little while, sometimes it’s permanent. Regardless, it means that sometimes we’re unable to do things we want or need to do in the way we’re…

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The revolutionary project management tool

(This is a sponsored post.)monday.com is a project management tool your team will actually enjoy using. It makes it fun and easy for everyone to collaborate, focus on what’s important, and get more done at work. It’s a visual project management tool that’ll help you and your team collaborate and achieve more together. With monday.com you can manage projects and tasks in a single board, move through the timeline visually and intuitively and communicate with your teammates in the context of each task. Plus, it connects with all the apps you already use and love like Dropbox, Google Drive, and Zapier. Start free trial. Direct Link to Article — PermalinkThe post The revolutionary project management tool appeared first on CSS-Tricks. Source: CssTricks

8 Best Free Photo Editing Apps For Marketers

Photo editing tools are becoming essential as the quality of social media images escalates. Customers want to see ads that are aesthetically pleasing and fit in with the rest of their highly visual feeds. That means you need to produce high-quality posts for your Facebook and Instagram campaigns. But what if you don’t have an Read more Source: https://adespresso.com/feed/

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