Posts Tagged:applications

rfp-robotRFP ROBOT: Website Request for Proposal Generator

The time has come for a new website (or website redesign), which means you need to write a website request for proposal or web RFP. A Google search produces a few examples, but they vary wildly and don’t seem to speak really to your goals for developing or redesigning a new website. You need to write a website RFP that will clearly articulate your needs and generate responses from the best website designers and developers out there. But how?

Have no fear, RFP Robot is here. He will walk you through a step-by-step process to help you work through the details of your project and create a PDF formatted website design RFP that will provide the information vendors need to write an accurate bid. RFP Robot will tell you what info you should include, point out pitfalls, and give examples.


Simple Server Side Rendering, Routing, and Page Transitions with Nuxt.js

A bit of a wordy title, huh? What is server side rendering? What does it have to do with routing and page transitions? What the heck is Nuxt.js? Funnily enough, even though it sounds complex, working with Nuxt.js and exploring the benefits of isn’t too difficult. Let’s get started! Server side rendering You might have heard people talking about server side rendering as of late. We looked at one method to do that with React recently. One particularly compelling aspect is the performance benefits. When we render our HTML, CSS, and JavaScript on the server, we often have less JavaScript to parse both initially and on subsequent updates. This article does really well going into more depth on the subject. My favorite takeaway is: By rendering on the server, you can cache the final shape of your data. Instead of grabbing JSON or other information from the server, parsing it,…

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Intro to Hoodie and React

Let’s take a look at Hoodie, the “Back-End as a Service” (BaaS) built specifically for front-end developers. I want to explain why I feel like it is a well-designed tool and deserves more exposure among the spectrum of competitors than it gets today. I’ve put together a demo that demonstrates some of the key features of the service, but I feel the need to first set the scene for its use case. Feel free to jump over to the demo repo if you want to get the code. Otherwise, join me for a brief overview. Setting the Scene It is no secret that JavaScript is eating the world these days and with its explosion in popularity, an ever-expanding ecosystem of tooling has arisen. The ease of developing a web app has skyrocketed in recent years thanks to these tools. Developer tools Prettier and ESLint give us freedom to write how…

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Building a Simple API with Amazon Lambda and Zappa

We recently had a client come to us with a request for a simple serverless API. They wanted little to no administrative overhead, so we went with the AWS Lambda service. It was my first foray with Lambda, and getting it set up came with its fair share of headaches. If you’re starting down the same path and want to build a simple API with Lambda, here’s a tutorial to help. Github If you would rather go through the tutorial on github, you can find it here AWS Lambda This is a great service offered by AWS that allows users to run a serverless application or function. It’s a cloud-based, serverless architecture that comes with continuous scaling out of the box. Deploy your code, and AWS does the rest. It will only run when “triggered,” either by another AWS service, or an HTTP call. It’s relatively young and has room…

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PHP/Laravel Developer – Morrison Agency – Atlanta, GA

Familiarity with PHP-based CMS applications, such as Perch and Drupal. Working with frontend developers on the backend needs of their projects….From Morrison Agency – Tue, 18 Jul 2017 07:13:39 GMT – View all Atlanta, GA jobs Source: http://rss.indeed.com/rss?q=Drupal+Developer

Musings on HTTP/2 and Bundling

HTTP/2 has been one of my areas of interest. In fact, I’ve written a few articles about it just in the last year. In one of those articles I made this unchecked assertion: If the user is on HTTP/2: You’ll serve more and smaller assets. You’ll avoid stuff like image sprites, inlined CSS, and scripts, and concatenated style sheets and scripts. I wasn’t the only one to say this, though, in all fairness to Rachel, she qualifies her assertion with caveats in her article. To be fair, it’s not bad advice in theory. HTTP/2’s multiplexing ability gives us leeway to avoid bundling without suffering the ill effects of head-of-line blocking (something we’re painfully familiar with in HTTP/1 environments). Unraveling some of these HTTP/1-specific optimizations can make development easier, too. In a time when web development seems more complicated than ever, who wouldn’t appreciate a little more simplicity? As with anything…

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Developer (WordPress) – LaneTerralever – Phoenix, AZ

What we look for in our Developers:. LaneTerralever is seeking a highly motivated developer for web applications to be part of our amazing team….From LaneTerralever – Sat, 15 Jul 2017 03:08:28 GMT – View all Phoenix, AZ jobs Source: http://rss.indeed.com/rss?q=Drupal+Developer

7 Multi-screen Benefits For Web Designers

Website designers often prefer using two or three screens during programming. Of course one can work but working with multiple screens is a lot better. After experiencing multi-screen benefits, most designers will tell you that they feel strange or incomplete when they have to work with one screen. Why use multi-screen When we’re talking about multi-screen, it means having two or more physical monitors connected to one operating system. However, it could also mean having multiple devices such as a smartphone, tablet, laptop or desktop. In most cases, the use of phones and other portable devices allows designers to make quick notes or quickly look up something while still coding on their laptops or PCs. When using multiple screens running from different operating systems, it’s usually for the purpose of testing. The use of multiple screens isn’t limited to the web design industry. It is widely used in several sectors. One…

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The reason why Acquia supports Net Neutrality

If you visit Acquia’s homepage today, you will be greeted by this banner: We’ve published this banner in solidarity with the hundreds of companies who are voicing their support of net neutrality. Net neutrality regulations ensure that web users are free to enjoy whatever sites they choose without interference from Internet Service Providers (ISPs). These protections establish an open web where people can explore and express their ideas. Under the current administration, the U.S. Federal Communications Commision favors less-strict regulation of net neutrality, which could drastically alter the way that people experience and access the web. Today, Acquia is joining the ranks of companies like Amazon, Atlassian, Netflix and Vimeo to advocate for strong net neutrality regulations. Why the FCC wants to soften net neutrality regulations In 2015, the United States implemented strong protections favoring net neutrality after ISPs were classified as common carriers under Title II of the Communications…

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Introducing Microcosm: Our Data Layer For React

One of my favorite things about working in client-services is the interval with which we start new work. As a React shop, this means we build a lot of new apps from the ground up. Along the way, we’ve distilled what we’ve learned and baked it into a tool that I, finally, want to talk about. Microcosm is our general purpose tool for keeping React apps organized. We use it to work with application state, split large projects into manageable chunks, and as the guiding star for our application architecture. Before I go too much further: check it out the project on Github! In this post, I’ll provide a high level overview of Microcosm and some of the features I find particularly valuable. At a glance Microcosm was born out of the Flux mindset. From there it draws similar pieces: Actions Actions are a general abstraction for performing a job.…

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I do whatever I want at work and I haven’t been fired yet

A few of us at Basecamp were recently discussing how decisions get made to “green light” new projects, and I came to the conclusion that it boils down a simple rule:If you can make a decision and you don’t think it’s going to get you fired, just do it.Basecamp operates without much in the way of formal decision making processes. We don’t have a budgeting process, we don’t have program reviews, we don’t have long term detailed plans. There’s a vision for where we want the company and the product to be going, and a tremendous amount of trust that people will use their time and energy to move us in that direction.The lack of those formal processes means it’s up to each individual to figure out what to do when they have an idea. The amount of implicit “decision making authority” differs for each person, depending on role, tenure, etc., but…

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PHP Developer – Starkmedia, Inc. – Milwaukee, WI

Drupal CMS development experience is desired. Develop and maintain both current and future web applications using PHP….From Starkmedia, Inc. – Fri, 07 Jul 2017 06:15:46 GMT – View all Milwaukee, WI jobs Source: http://rss.indeed.com/rss?q=Drupal+Developer

The Structure of an Elm Application

Most languages when they are in their infancy, tend to be considered “toy languages” and are only used for trivial or small projects. But this is not the case with Elm, where its true power shines in complex and large applications. It is not only possible to build some parts of an application in Elm and integrate those components into a larger JS application, but it is also possible to build the entire application without touching any other language making it an excellent alternative to JS frameworks like React. In this article, we will explore the structure of an Elm application using a simple site to manage plain-text documents as an example. Article Series: Why Elm? (And How To Get Started With It) Introduction to The Elm Architecture and How to Build our First Application The Structure of an Elm Application (You are here!) Some of the topics covered in…

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15 Useful JavaScript Libraries to Enhance Your Site

Inspired Magazine Inspired Magazine – creativity & inspiration daily Making a great site requires a lot of skills, but you don’t always have to develop everything completely from scratch. To use any of the JavaScript libraries presented in this article, you will need to have at least some existing JavaScript skills, but you also don’t necessarily need to be an expert. What you do need to be expert with is working out how to blend the libraries into a site to get the most benefit from them. This isn’t really something that can be taught. It’s a skill you can only learn by doing. Once you have mastered the concepts, however, there is no limit to your creativity and what you can achieve with it. Collected here is our list of the most useful JavaScript libraries available to programmers for site enhancement. You may not see your favorite listed here,…

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Decoupling Drupal with Waterwheel for Ember and React

As I’ve written previously, the Waterwheel ecosystem and Reservoir distribution help pave the way for non-Drupal developers to use decoupled Drupal as a headless back end without having to learn a lick of Drupal or PHP. Thanks to the Contenta team, there is now a growing slate of applications backed by decoupled Drupal and web services modules like JSON API and Simple OAuth. Now, the Waterwheel team is excited to release several new projects that benefit developers developing JavaScript applications built in Ember and React. With the release of reference applications in Ember and React and an Ember add-on, the Waterwheel ecosystem is moving beyond SDKs like Waterwheel.js and toward a larger range of plugins, boilerplates, and examples to help you develop your Drupal-backed JavaScript applications more swiftly. Best of all, these projects can be used interchangeably to build applications backed by API-first Drupal 8 with JSON API, Acquia’s just-released…

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Drupal Developer – IQ Solutions – Remote

The Drupal Developer creates applications; Experience in Drupal site building, module development and Drupal theming equivalent to an Acquia Grand Master…From IQ Solutions – Thu, 22 Jun 2017 03:28:32 GMT – View all Remote jobs Source: http://rss.indeed.com/rss?q=Drupal+Developer

Introducing Reservoir, a Distribution for Decoupling Drupal

Decoupling Drupal can be arduous, whether you’re developing a Drupal-backed front end or configuring Drupal to be an ideal content repository for decoupled applications. Adding to the challenge is the fact that there is a lack of definitive starting points, boilerplates, and best practices. But the issue isn’t simply that there are so many competing approaches; it’s also that there doesn’t yet exist an easy starting point for non-Drupal developers who solely want to configure Drupal to be the back end for their front-end applications and get on with development. Acquia’s Office of the CTO is pleased to announce the release of Reservoir, an experimental Drupal distribution developed by Wim Leers (coordinator of Drupal’s API-first initiative) and Ted Bowman. Beyond comprising an exceptional starting point for any decoupled Drupal implementation, it is also designed to on-board developers of all backgrounds: a decoupled Drupal distribution and optimal back end for every…

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Using Mixins in Vue.js

It’s a common situation: you have two components that are pretty similar, they share the same basic functionality, but there’s enough that’s different about each of them that you come to a crossroads: do I split this component into two different components? Or do I keep one component, but create enough variance with props that I can alter each one? Neither of these solutions is perfect: if you split it into two components, you run the risk of having to update it in two places if the functionality ever changes, defeating DRY premises. On the other hand, too many props can get really messy very quickly, and force the maintainer, even if it’s yourself, to understand a lot of context in order to use it, which can slow you down. Enter mixins. Mixins in Vue are useful for writing in a functional style because ultimately, functional programming is about making…

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Using Microcosm Presenters to Manage Complex Features

We made Microcosm to help us manage state and data flow in our JavaScript applications. We think it’s pretty great. We recently used it to help our friends at iContact launch a brand new email editor. Today, I’d like to show you how I used one of my favorite features of Microcosm to ship a particularly gnarly feature. In addition to adding text, photos, and buttons to their emails, users can add code blocks which let them manually enter HTML to be inserted into the email. The feature in question was to add server-side code santization, to make sure user-submitted HTML isn’t invalid or potentially malicious. The logic is roughly defined as follows: User modifies the HTML & hits “preview”; HTML is sent up to the server and sanitized; The resulting HTML is displayed in the canvas; If the code is unmodified, user can “apply” the code or continue editing;…

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