Posts Tagged:application

rfp-robotRFP ROBOT: Website Request for Proposal Generator

The time has come for a new website (or website redesign), which means you need to write a website request for proposal or web RFP. A Google search produces a few examples, but they vary wildly and don’t seem to speak really to your goals for developing or redesigning a new website. You need to write a website RFP that will clearly articulate your needs and generate responses from the best website designers and developers out there. But how?

Have no fear, RFP Robot is here. He will walk you through a step-by-step process to help you work through the details of your project and create a PDF formatted website design RFP that will provide the information vendors need to write an accurate bid. RFP Robot will tell you what info you should include, point out pitfalls, and give examples.


Features as Apps

One of the most important things that I’ve learned when it comes to building technology products, especially at the super early-stage, is the reality that designing a real MVP (Minimum Viable Product) is incredibly difficult to do. I’ve already talked about this once or twice on this blog before… The challenge of keeping things MVP-ish is real and they mostly stem from these two issues / challenges: The availability of robust frameworks and APIs make it far too easy to (accidentally) scale a simple experiment based on a simple hypothesis into more than just a simple MVP. It is psychologically difficult to minimize, constrain, and limit our “vision” of what could be with what should be, especially with so many existing examples to compare to (and the availability of great tooling – see #1). Practice, a shit-ton of discipline, and a hyper-judicious pragmatic framework are necessary to stay trim, stay lean,…

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Web Application Analyst position is open

Source: https://jobs.drupal.org/all-jobs/feed

A Short History of WaSP and Why Web Standards Matter

In August of 2013, Aaron Gustafson posted to the WaSP blog. He had a bittersweet message for a community that he had helped lead: Thanks to the hard work of countless WaSP members and supporters (like you), Tim Berners-Lee’s vision of the web as an open, accessible, and universal community is largely the reality. While there is still work to be done, the sting of the WaSP is no longer necessary. And so it is time for us to close down The Web Standards Project. If there’s just the slightest hint of wistful regret in Gustafson’s message, it’s because the Web Standards Project changed everything that had become the norm on the web during its 15+ years of service. Through dedication and developer advocacy, they hoisted the web up from a nest of browser incompatibility and meaningless markup to the standardized and feature-rich application platform most of us know today.…

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To PESOS or to POSSE?

Yesterday I shared that I uninstalled the Facebook application from my phone. My friend Simon Surtees was quick to text me: “I for one am pleased you have left Facebook. Less Cayman Island pictures!”. Not too fast Simon. I never said that I left Facebook or that I’d stop posting on Facebook. Plus, I’ll have more Cayman Islands pictures to share soon. 🙂 As a majority of my friends and family communicate on Facebook and Twitter, I still want to share updates on social media. However, I believe I can do it in a more thoughtful manner that allows me to take back control over my own data. There are a couple of ways I could go about that: I could share my status updates and photos on a service like Facebook or Twitter and then automatically download and publish them to my website. I could publish my status updates…

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The Best UX is No User Interface at All

I have been obsessed with User Interfaces (UI) for as long as I can remember. I remember marveling at the beauty that was Compaq TabWorks while I played “The Incredible Machine” and listened to “Tears For Fears—Greatest Hits” on the family computer. Don’t judge me—I was listening to “Mad World” way before Donny Darko and that creepy rabbit. If none of those references landed with you, it’s probably because I’m super old. In the words of George Castanza, “It’s not you, it’s me.” That’s another super old reference you might not get. You know what—forget all that, let’s move on. I really got into UI when I bought my own computer. I had joined the Coast Guard and saved a bunch of money during boot camp (when you can’t go shopping—you know—because of push-ups and stuff). I wanted to buy a Chevy Cavalier (sadly, that’s not a joke), but my…

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Taking control of my data and social media

© Andrei Lacatusu Earlier this month, I set a resolution to blog more and use social media less. While I still need to work on blogging more, I’m certainly spending less time on Facebook. I’m halfway there. So far, only my mom has complained about me spending less time on Facebook. This morning when my alarm woke me up at 4:45am, I took it a step further. Most mornings, I spend ten minutes checking Facebook on my phone. Today, however, I deleted the Facebook application from my phone, rolled out of bed and started my workday. Great! As an advocate for the open web, I’ve written a lot about the problems that Facebook and other walled gardens pose. While I have helped raise awareness and have contributed time and money to winning back the open web, I haven’t fully embraced the philosophy on my own site. For over 12 years,…

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Design Systems: Building a Parts Kit

In our series on design systems, we’ve discussed the advantages and approaches to creating a system from a design perspective. In this post, I’d like to cover some of the technical benefits of a well-organized built design system, or “parts kit”. By now, you’re hopefully convinced of the benefits of a design system and are ready to invest the time and money to partner with an agency, like Viget, to create something that achieves your vision. The next step will be to apply it to your digital platforms by building it. But wait! If the design system represents your vision and investment, a good parts kit is like insurance that protects that vision when it goes out into the world. The Importance of Building it Right A well-constructed parts kit has many benefits that can ensure the consistency and longevity of a design system. The investment in development quality is…

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Stimulus 1.0: A modest JavaScript framework for the HTML you already have

Modern JavaScript doesn’t have to mean single-page, client-side MVC apps.We write a lot of JavaScript at Basecamp, but we don’t use it to create “JavaScript applications” in the contemporary sense. All our applications have server-side rendered HTML at their core, then add sprinkles of JavaScript to make them sparkle.This is the way of the majestic monolith. Basecamp runs across half a dozen platforms, including native mobile apps, with a single set of controllers, views, and models created using Ruby on Rails. Having a single, shared interface that can be updated in a single place is key to being able to perform with a small team, despite the many platforms.It allows us to party with productivity like days of yore. A throwback to when a single programmer could make rapacious progress without getting stuck in layers of indirection or distributed systems. A time before everyone thought the holy grail was to confine their…

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People Writing About Style Guides

Are you thinking about style guides lately? It seems to me it couldn’t be a hotter topic these days. I’m delighted to see it, as someone who was trying to think and build this way when the prevailing wisdom was nice thought, but these never work. I suspect it’s threefold why style guides and design systems have taken off: Component-based front-end architectures becoming very popular Styling philosophies that scope styles becoming very popular A shift in community attitude that style guides work That last one feels akin to cryptocurrency to me. If everyone believes in the value, it works. If people stop believing in the value, it dies. Anyway, in my typical Coffee-and-RSS mornings, I’ve come across quite a few recently written articles on style guides, so I figured I’d round them up for your enjoyment. How to Build a Design System with a Small Team by Naema Baskanderi: As…

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Are you the boutique or are you Target?

A couple weeks ago we decided to get an artificial Christmas tree. I love real trees, but years of evidence have proven I’m allergic. We think the dog is too. And the cleanup is a nightmare.So we went to Target looking for one.I didn’t want to go to Target, but my wife and kid were going and I didn’t feel like spending the day by myself. Plus, I wanted to improve our Wifi network and Target carries the Google Wifi mesh devices.I begrudgingly went along.My hangup with Target is that everytime I go to look for something specific, they don’t have it. Which was made abundantly clear again on this trip. They didn’t have any Christmas things left. They didn’t have a Google Wifi mesh network either.I began regretting tagging along.But that Saturday I didn’t want to waste my energy on a bad attitude, so I decided to treat Target a lot less specifically.I went…

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Using CSS Clip Path to Create Interactive Effects

Do you remember being a kid, cutting out pictures from magazines? Did you glue them onto paper to create your own collages? This post is about cutting out images on the web using the CSS property clip-path. We will discuss how to do the cutting and how we can use these cut-out parts to create some interesting effects, combining these cut-out parts with the original image. I’ll use the following photo as an example. The flower stands out from the rest of the photo. It is a natural focal point to cut out and create our effects around. Image courtesy of Unsplash. Credit: Hermes Rivera Creating the SVG First off, we are going to create a new SVG file and import our example image into it. You will need image editing software with vector capability to make the cut. I’m using Inkscape, a free open source editor, but you can…

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Creating a Vue.js Serverless Checkout Form: Configure the Checkout Component

This is the fourth post in a four-part series. In Part one, we set up a serverless Stripe function on Azure. Part two covered how we hosted the function on Github. The third part covered Stripe Elements in Vue. This last post shows how to configure the checkout component and make the shopping cart fully functional. Article Series: Setup and Testing Stripe Function and Hosting Application and Checkout Component Configure the Checkout Component (This Post) As a reminder, here’s where we are in our application at this point: Configuring the Checkout Component We have to do a few things to adjust the component in order for it to meet our needs: Make sure the form is only displaying if we haven’t submitted it—we’ll deal with the logic for this in our pay method in a moment Allow the form to take a customer’s email address in case something is wrong…

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Acquia Headless Lightning and Content API

Acquia Headless Lightning provides an API-first back-end content repository that allows for easy ingestion by front-end applications. Front-end developers requiring a headless or decoupled CMS have immediate access to a cloud-hosted content repository service for development, delivering, and production. Headless Lighting builds on the Acquia Lightning distribution and configures the basic tool set provided by the contrib modules selected and implemented in Lightning’s Content API. Acquia Headless Lightning advantages for front-end developers: It makes the user environment more intuitive for non-Drupalists, and more logical for all developers using Drupal primarily as a content repository. It is more opinionated about and examples of how an external / front-end application should authenticate against and consume the Content API. Features: JSON Content Module Presentation layer that hides or redirects users from content rendered by the Drupal application. User Environment Configures user interface opinions on the administrative back-end, making it intuitive to create and…

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Acquia's Lightning for Headless CMS

Acquia Headless Lightning provides an API-first back-end content repository that allows for easy ingestion by front-end applications. Front-end developers requiring a headless CMS or decoupled CMS have immediate access to a cloud-hosted content repository service for development, delivering, and production. Headless Lighting builds on the Acquia Lightning distribution and configures the basic tool set provided by the contrib modules selected and implemented in Lightning’s Content API. Acquia Headless Lightning advantages for front-end developers: It makes the user environment more intuitive for non-Drupalists, and more logical for all developers using Drupal primarily as a content repository. It is more opinionated about and examples of how an external / front-end application should authenticate against and consume the Content API. Features: JSON Content Module Presentation layer that hides or redirects users from content rendered by the Drupal application. User Environment Configures user interface opinions on the administrative back-end, making it intuitive to create and…

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Creating a Vue.js Serverless Checkout Form: Application and Checkout Component

This is the third post in a four-part series. In part one, we set up a serverless Stripe function on Azure. Part two covered how we hosted the function on Github. This post will focus on wiring everything up as a Vue.js application. Article Series: Setup and Testing Stripe Function and Hosting Application and Checkout Component (This Post) Configure the Checkout Component Stripe has a number of ways to build out a checkout form, the most basic being a single button on the page that you trigger to pull up their custom modal. There’s a repo and component for this, but as easy as that is to implement (it’s probably the most simple way to do it), I wanted a little more customization and wanted the checkout flow to be part of the page and application. This approach wouldn’t work for my needs. Stripe Elements Stripe also offers a thing…

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Creating a Vue.js Serverless Checkout Form: Application and Checkout Component

This is the third post in a four-part series. In part one, we set up a serverless Stripe function on Azure. Part two covered how we hosted the function on Github. This post will focus on wiring everything up as a Vue.js application. Article Series: Setup and Testing Stripe Function and Hosting Application and Checkout Component (This Post) Configure the Checkout Component Stripe has a number of ways to build out a checkout form, the most basic being a single button on the page that you trigger to pull up their custom modal. There’s a repo and component for this, but as easy as that is to implement (it’s probably the most simple way to do it), I wanted a little more customization and wanted the checkout flow to be part of the page and application. This approach wouldn’t work for my needs. Stripe Elements Stripe also offers a thing…

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Creating a Vue.js Serverless Checkout Form: Stripe Function and Hosting

We’re now in the second post of a four-part series where we’re creating a checkout form application in Vue.js that can accept payments via the Stripe API. In part one, we looked at the concept of serverless functions, set one up in Azure, and connected it to a Stripe account. In this post, we’ll focus on setting up Stripe as a serverless function and hosting it all on Github. Article Series: Setup and Testing Stripe Function and Hosting (This Post) Application and Checkout Component (Coming Soon) Configure the Checkout Component (Coming Soon) First, we’re going write our function and test it out in the portal, but eventually we’re going to move it over to Github and have Azure pull in the code. I’ll explain why we do this in a moment. For now, in order to get it working and testable, we’re going to write it in the portal and…

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How Do You Todo? A Microcosm / Redux Comparison

For those who don’t know, we’ve been working on our own React framework here at Viget called Microcosm. Development on Microcosm started before Redux had hit the scene and while the two share a number of similarities, there are a few key differences we’ll be highlighting in this post. I’ve taken the Todo app example from Redux’s docs (complete app forked here), and implemented my own Todo app in Microcosm. We’ll run through these codebases side by side comparing how the two frameworks help you with different developer tasks. Enough chatter, let’s get to it! Entry point So you’ve yarnpm installed the dependency, now what? Javascript // Redux // index.js import React from ‘react’ import { render } from ‘react-dom’ import { Provider } from ‘react-redux’ import { createStore } from ‘redux’ import todoApp from ‘./reducers/index’ import App from ‘./components/App’ let store = createStore(todoApp) render( <Provider store={store}> <App /> </Provider>,…

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Make Your Site Faster with Preconnect Hints

Requesting an external resource on a website or application incurs several round-trips before the browser can actually start to download the resource. These round-trips include the DNS lookup, TCP handshake, and TLS negotiation (if SSL is being used). Depending on the page and the network conditions, these round-trips can add hundreds of milliseconds of latency, or more. If you are requesting resources from several different hosts, this can add up fast, and you could be looking at a page that feels more sluggish than it needs to be, especially on slower cellular connections, flaky wifi, or congested networks. One of the the easiest ways to speed up your website or application is to simply add preconnect hints for any hosts that you will be requesting assets from. These hints essentially tell the browser what origins will be used for resources, so that it can then prep things by establishing all…

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