Posts Tagged:app

rfp-robotRFP ROBOT: Website Request for Proposal Generator

The time has come for a new website (or website redesign), which means you need to write a website request for proposal or web RFP. A Google search produces a few examples, but they vary wildly and don’t seem to speak really to your goals for developing or redesigning a new website. You need to write a website RFP that will clearly articulate your needs and generate responses from the best website designers and developers out there. But how?

Have no fear, RFP Robot is here. He will walk you through a step-by-step process to help you work through the details of your project and create a PDF formatted website design RFP that will provide the information vendors need to write an accurate bid. RFP Robot will tell you what info you should include, point out pitfalls, and give examples.


React Sketch.app

The “normal” workflow I’m sure we’ve all lived is that design happens, then coding happens. A healthy workflow has back-and-forth between everyone involved in a project, including designers and developers, but still: The code is the final product. You design your way to code, you don’t code your way to designs. It was only a little over a month ago when it was news that Sketch 43 was moving to a .JSON file format. The final release notes drop the news quite blasé: Revised file format But Jasim A Basheer rightly made a big deal of it: … it will fundamentally change how the design tools game will be played out in the coming years. “enables more powerful integrations for third-party developers” is stating it lightly. This is what the fine folks at Bohemian Coding has done — they opened up Sketch’s file format into a neat JSON making it possible for…

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Make It Rain

https://medium.com/media/e049c1d99323c5afa8e5d8a327472f1a/hrefMatt Stock is a business owner who loves marketing and has embraced the unglamorous job of selling a pretty mundane service: basement waterproofing. He’s tried everything from Yellow Pages to billboards to Internet advertising at U.S. Waterproofing, his 60-year-old family business. But Matt faced one of his greatest challenges as a business owner and a marketer in 2012, when Illinois was hit with a drought.https://medium.com/media/13eca3d7857d9c22d0646d2a6d6cee24/hrefIllustration by Nate OttoTranscript[SOUND OF RAIN]MATT STOCK: Music to our ears is when rain occurs. I was hoping on your way over here there’d be a raincloud follow you. My name’s Matthew Stock. I am the president of U.S. Waterproofing.When there’s water in a basement, unless someone has prior experience, it’s not easy to diagnose it. Even for us when we come there, we’re not there the second it rains, we have to ask a lot of questions, use a certain process to figure out where it’s coming from.…

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PWA Directory

The other day I was watching an interview with Ade Oshineye where he discussed his work on the PWA Directory at Google, a showcase of progressive web apps. And it’s pretty neat! It lists a whole bunch of PWAs out there and you can filter them by Lighthouse metrics – that’s the auditing tool from Google that scores a web app and gives us developers the ability to improve them. Direct Link to Article — Permalink PWA Directory is a post from CSS-Tricks Source: CssTricks

Breadcrumb Navigation & its Usefulness

While navigating through websites, breadcrumbs are one way to ensure that you (or your users) can browse and explore easily. Breadcrumbs, or breadcrumb navigation links, are a set of hyperlinks that function as an extra navigation feature for websites. Breadcrumbs positively effect usability by minimizing the number of actions a website user needs to take to get into high-level pages, which enhances ease of navigation. They also provide indication as to the exact location of the visitor within the website’s hierarchy, providing context and, essentially, a virtual mini map of the site.  What are Breadcrumbs? A “breadcrumb” is a kind of alternate navigation method which helps to reveal the visitor’s location within a website or Web app. We often find breadcrumbs on websites that have an extensive catalogue of information organized in a hierarchical manner. We can also see breadcrumbs in Web apps that have a vast quantity of content,…

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mnml app: Almost Done

Just a few missing (but important) pieces to put together before this one will be done and shipped and out in the wild. MNML builds (so far) It’s been along time coming for mnml app and it’s taken nearly a year to get from the initial concept to something that will ultimately land in the hands of writers and publishers who love Medium.com. To be honest, version 1.0 would have shipped a lot sooner if life hadn’t gotten completely in the way. Not bad things, of course… just many other things that have taken up the very limited time that I have to put things together. Waiting for me to finish… But, very soon, mnml will sit besides Desk in its rightful place in the Mac App Store and it’ll be exciting to see other folks finally be able to use it. And, of course, I’m excited to start getting a little…

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Facebook F8 2017 – What Marketers Need to Know

Facebook’s F8 conferences have earned the reputation of being one of the most innovative and fascinating tech events of the year. While F8 is known as the “Facebook Developer Conference”, it doesn’t mean there’s only news about high-tech gadgets. In fact, there are also many insights and ideas that social media marketers can use. If you missed the F8 conference live broadcast, it’s not too late to read about all the announcements. We worked hard for you, and gathered together the most important announcements about Facebook, Messenger, Instagram, Workplace, Oculus, and other Facebook’s apps. During his (most waited) speech at F8 Mark Zuckerberg said: We are building the technology to give anyone the power to share anything they want with anyone else.” Mark Zuckerberg on the stage of F8 at Fort Mason (San Francisco) And we better believe him. Zooming on Facebook’s 10-year roadmap reveals (as if we didn’t know!)…

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The Power of Custom Directives in Vue

When you’re initially learning a JavaScript framework, it feels a little like being a kid in a candy store. You take in everything available to you, and right off the bat, there are things that will make your life as a developer easier. Inevitably though, we all reach a point working with a framework where we have a use-case that the framework doesn’t cover very well. The beautiful thing about Vue is that it’s incredibly feature-rich. But even if you have an edge case not covered by the framework, it’s got your back there as well, because you can quite easily create a custom directive. What are directives? I’ve written a post here on directives in my guide on Vue.js, but let’s do a refresher. Directives are tiny commands that you can attach to DOM elements. They are prefixed with v- to let the library know you’re using a special…

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When Does a Project Need React?

You know when a project needs HTML and CSS, because it’s all of them. When you reach for JavaScript is fairly clear: when you need interactivity or some functionality that only JavaScript can provide. It used to be fairly clear when we reached for libraries. We reached for jQuery to help us simplify working with the DOM, Ajax, and handle cross-browser issues with JavaScript. We reached for underscore to give us helper functions that the JavaScript alone didn’t have. As the need for these libraries fades, and we see a massive rise in new frameworks, I’d argue it’s not as clear when to reach for them. At what point do we need React? I’m just going to use React as a placeholder here for kinda large JavaScript framework thingies. Vue, Ember, Svelte… whatever. I understand they aren’t all the same, but when to reach for them I find equally nebulous.…

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What Not to Wearable: Part 1

With every advance in connected technology, potential new features abound. Sensors monitor your fitness performance or sleep quality. Haptic vibrations in insoles guide you to take a left or a right, allowing you to navigate without looking at a screen. NFC technology in a ring allows you to pay for a purchase without fumbling around in a bag or combing through pockets. These technologies allow our accessories to become devices for input and output. All this sounds exciting, freeing even. These innovations could allow us to turn our focus away from screens and back to the material world, to be simultaneously connected to technology while also present in the moment. And that’s incredible. However, this also presents new challenges. Besides the multitude of complex technical problems we must address, from charging and battery life to data networks and security, we will also have to solve some key strategic and design problems. When Fashion and Tech Collide Connected technology has migrated from appliances,…

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A Few Thoughts on Indie Projects

I’ve spoken on the topic of “indie projects” quite a few times on the blog but I’ve never done it via the vlog and so yesterday I thought I’d capture a few candid thoughts. I mention mnml app (releasing soon) and Desk App (v3.1 was released recently)! This is also the longest vlog that I’ve ever put together, coming in north of 22 minutes. Yikes. You can read a few of my other thoughts here: On Being an Indie Developer The Indie Developer and the Mac App Store What Type of Apps Do Indie Devs Work On? Indie Apps and Inspiration Career Development as an Indie Developer Indie-Serious…? Full Indie? The Part-Time Indie…? Building an Indie App is Work The post A Few Thoughts on Indie Projects appeared first on John Saddington. Source: https://john.do/

Live Streaming on YouTube…

A few months back YouTube opened up a new feature on their mobile apps that gave content creators the ability to live stream with one major catch: You had to have at least 10,000 subscribers to do it. I didn’t mind this threshold, at the time, and I considered it a bit of a “stretch goal,” if you will. But recently they’ve dropped it to 1,000 which means that it’s been enabled on my device: 1,000 subs and at least 90 days old. I can now see the option enabled in the iOS app directly. Kind of neat that they had it implemented in the app to automatically turn “on” when you climb over 1k subs. Here are a few screenshots of a test I did this morning of the app: Without 1,000 subs, you’d just see the “Record” button. Create a title! Go Public or Unlisted. Add that title! A…

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Best HTML Email Design Dimensions: How Wide Should Your Email Template Be?

The template you are using for your HTML email marketing campaign can go a long way in converting your email recipients to customers. As such, you need to make sure that people who receive them can view your emails properly. The question is: What is the best width for your email marketing campaign? In this article, we will attempt to answer the question, as well as discuss important tips related to creating effective HTML email newsletters. A Brief Background on HTML Email Design Back in the day, Microsoft Outlook was considered as the primary email client during the time when the average width of the desktop monitor was 1,024 pixels. As a result, email marketers had to conform to the size to fulfill the constraints. From there, the 600-pixel width for HTML email came into being. However, times have changed since then, and screen resolutions have become bigger. In fact,…

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ES6 modules support lands in browsers: is it time to rethink bundling?

Modules, as in, this kind of syntax right in JavaScript: import { myCounter, someOtherThing } from ‘utilities’; Which we’d normally use Webpack to bundle, but now is supported in Safari Technology Preview, Firefox Nightly (flag), and Edge. It’s designed to support progressive enhancement, as you can safely link to a bundled version and a non-bundled version without having browsers download both. Stefan Judis shows: <!– in case ES6 modules are supported –> <script src=”app/index.js” type=”module”></script> <!– in case ES6 modules aren’t supported –> <script src=”dist/bundle.js” defer nomodule></script> Not bundling means simpler build processes, which is great, but forgoing all the other cool stuff a tool like Webpack can do, like “tree shaking”. Also, all those imports are individual HTTP requests, which may not be as big of a deal in HTTP/2, but still isn’t great: Khan Academy discovered the same thing a while ago when experimenting with HTTP/2. The idea…

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Desk App v3.1

Yup, after a bit of a delay, v3.1 of Desk App has gotten through the App Store Review process and should be available to update worldwide. What’s neat is that the entire review process, from submission to approval, took less than 24 hours. Unbelievable speed considering the previous time required. Most excellent! Fast turn-around! This update brings a few needed changes and fixes from the original v3.0 release: Left panel was having some issues. Thanks to everyone who identified the issues and submitted tickets! Publishing and Quick Publish was having some problems for some folks. That sucks, obviously, because this is what the app was meant to do! Should be fixed. Text Editor was having some issues with tables, images, Markdown, WYSIWYG conversion, shortcuts, and even editor view configs… essentially there was a lot that was broken (but not for everyone) but just took a lot longer to track down than I had…

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Say You Need a Persistent Data Store Entirely on the Client-Side

You got your localStorage. You got your IndexedDB. Those are both client side and capable of storing data, but they are limited to a single browser. I can’t store data there from my laptop then come back later on my phone and have the same data. That’s the kind of thing websites have back-end databases for. The data is stored elsewhere, so you have access everywhere. But what if you don’t want to deal with a back end? There are third-party solutions for this. Firebase Firebase has a “Realtime Database” feature, so not only can you gather, store, and send data from the client side, that data is synced across any other device currently connected to the same database (if you care to do that). Instead of typical HTTP requests, the Firebase Realtime Database uses data synchronization—every time data changes, any connected device receives that update within milliseconds. That’s just…

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Lead Generation with Instagram—The Definitive Guide

When you’ve mastered lead generation on Facebook, it feels like you’re firing on all cylinders. You have eBooks, free tools, surveys, all types of lead magnets going out. You have traffic and conversions coming in. Everything is going great — your lead generation is better than ever before. Then you turn to Instagram, and everything works a little differently. Suddenly, you can’t push your great new eBook anymore. Instagram is a visual platform, and your text-heavy copy looks clumsy and out of place. Although you want to use Instagram as another lead generation tool, you can’t immediately transfer your Facebook success onto this new platform — until now. We’ll go through the basics of lead generation on Instagram—all the formal and informal ways you can nudge potential customers from Instagram to your product—and offer some tips to get you started. What Is Lead Generation and Why Should I Bother? Lead…

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You Butter Believe It!

Every year in the weeks leading up to Easter, the four-person staff at Danish Maid Butter Co. starts counting sheep. The Chicago company has made lamb-shaped butter for more than 50 years, moving from wooden molds dropped in cans of ice water to a more modern process. There are other parts of Danish Maid’s business that are larger and growing faster, but the two siblings that run the company remain committed to the butter lambs as an important link to both their family legacy and current generations of customers.https://medium.com/media/38b6dbea766abf8cbc22dd6b1fe66dd9/hrefAfter putting this episode to bed yesterday, I headed off to my first-ever Passover Seder at a friend’s home and was surprised to find a Danish Maid butter lamb on the table. The host explained that his family buys one every year for Passover because they’re fun and this is the only time you can get them. As I spread the butter…

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Debugging Tips and Tricks

Writing code is only one small piece of being a developer. In order to be efficient and capable at our jobs, we must also excel at debugging. When I dedicate some time to learning new debugging skills, I often find I can move much quicker, and add more value to the teams I work on. I have a few tips and tricks I rely on pretty heavily and found that I give the same advice again and again during workshops, so here’s a compilation of some of them, as well as some from the community. We’ll start with some core tenants and then drill down to more specific examples. Main Concepts Isolate the Problem Isolation is possibly the strongest core tenant in all of debugging. Our codebases can be sprawling, with different libraries, frameworks, and they can include many contributors, even people who aren’t working on the project anymore. Isolating…

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Strangers in the Woods Together

In the latest episode of ShopTalk, Robyn Kanner told a story of interviewing for a UX job that stuck with me. They asked her to create a social app for mountain bikers. Talk out how the app might work, sketch out some flows, you know, UX work. Exactly what they were expecting and what I would have done. But then Robyn turned the table on them and asked what they are going to do about saftey. This app is going to allow strangers to connect and meet in the woods together, how can you ensure their safety? Geez. Seems obvious after she says it, but at the outset of the question it didn’t seem so obvious. At least to a dude like me. As Mike Monterio put it, we’re both big dudes who don’t think twice about getting into a Lyft with strangers, but is top of mind for plenty…

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