Category Archive for: web developers

rfp-robotRFP ROBOT: Website Request for Proposal Generator

The time has come for a new website (or website redesign), which means you need to write a website request for proposal or web RFP. A Google search produces a few examples, but they vary wildly and don’t seem to speak really to your goals for developing or redesigning a new website. You need to write a website RFP that will clearly articulate your needs and generate responses from the best website designers and developers out there. But how?

Have no fear, RFP Robot is here. He will walk you through a step-by-step process to help you work through the details of your project and create a PDF formatted website design RFP that will provide the information vendors need to write an accurate bid. RFP Robot will tell you what info you should include, point out pitfalls, and give examples.


web developers Visalia CA

Pixeldust offers consulting services for specifications, strategy, prototyping, website audits, project management, and development.

web developers North Las Vegas NV

Pixeldust offers consulting services for specifications, strategy, prototyping, website audits, project management, and development.

The next big jump in Basecamp accessibility!

How we made the Basecamp 3 Jump Menu accessibleThe Basecamp 3 Jump MenuEarlier this year I wrote about How we stopped making excuses and started improving Basecamp’s accessibility. Accessibility improvements in Basecamp 3 have come in two ways: All new features we’ve shipped over the past year and a half have been designed and tested to meet WCAG AA guidelines (The Web Content Accessibility Guidelines, or WCAG, provides a shared standard that web developers can follow to make sure their products are accessible).At the same time, we’ve gone back and retrofitted existing features and interactions for better accessibility. Today I’m excited to announce that we just completed some significant improvements to the Basecamp 3 Jump Menu!The jump menu has always been the quickest way for getting to a person, project, recently visited page, and My assignments/bookmarks/schedule /drafts/latest activity. Here’s a look at it in action:Note the small-ish “Press ⌘+J to show the menu” labelIn…

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Selectors That Depend on Layout

“Why the heck don’t we have ::first-column?” I heard someone ask that the other day and it’s a valid question. I’d even take that question further by asking about ::nth-column() or whatever else relates to CSS columns. We have stuff like ::first-letter and ::first-line. Why not others? There are many notable things missing from the “nth” crowd. Seven years ago, I wrote “A Call for ::nth-everything” and it included clear use cases like, perhaps, selecting the first two lines of a paragraph. I don’t know all the technical details of it all, but I know there are some fairly decent reasons why we don’t have all of these in CSS. Part of it is the difficulty of getting it specced (e.g. words and characters get tricky across written languages) and part of it is the difficulty of implementing them. What I just found out is that there is a FAQ…

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All Fired Up About Specificity

You never know where the next Grand Debate™ in front-end is going to come from! Case in point: we just saw one recently based on a little Twitter poll by Max Stoiber in which 57% of people got it wrong. There were reactions ranging from the innocuous hey fun a little brain teaser! to the state of web education is in shambles and beyond. I heard from a number of folks that they just felt sad that so many people don’t know the answer to a fairly simple question. To be fair, it was (intentionally, I’m sure) rather tricky! It wasn’t really a question about CSS — it was more about the idea that the order of HTML attributes doesn’t matter. It’s the order of CSS that does. One extreme response I saw said that front-end stuff like this is needlessly complicated and getting it wrong is almost a point…

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Jumpstart Your Drupal 8 Adventure with this Webinar on Acquia Lightning

If you’re going to start a Drupal 8 project, and there are many reasons why this makes sense, you should start with Acquia Lightning. Because this flexible Drupal 8 distribution streamlines the process of building and delivering feature-rich Drupal 8 sites. It takes the guesswork out of Drupal 8 module selection and configuration for key features like media, page building, and workflow. The result: Acquia Lightning saves web developers and builders 30 percent or more time on new projects. Marketers and enterprise content teams get more done, more effectively, with powerful authoring capabilities. In other words, it’s like getting a free head start on Drupal 8. And on Tuesday, September 25, it will get even easier to get going with Lightning, and Drupal 8, because Acquia is offering a one-hour webinar, Build Better Drupal Sites Faster with Acquia Lightning. David Aponovich, senior director for product marketing at Acquia, will be…

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SAP Concur – Senior Web Developer – SAP – Bellevue, WA

React, Serverless, Drupal, WordPress). Expertise in mentoring and developing other web developers. We’re seeking a Senior Web Developer will be responsible for…From SAP – Tue, 21 Aug 2018 21:04:45 GMT – View all Bellevue, WA jobs Source: http://rss.indeed.com/rss?q=Drupal+Developer

Web Developers position is open @wiseandhammer

ON, Canada Source: https://jobs.drupal.org/all-jobs/feed

Advanced Document Conversions with Filestack

You might know Filestack from being an incredible service to add file uploading, storage, and management to your own web apps. There is another thing Filestack can do for you: convert documents into different formats. For one thing, it can manipulate documents. Take images. Perhaps you would like to offer some image manipulation for your users uploaded images, like cropping and rotation. That’s a common feature for apps that offer avatar uploading. With Filestack, you got it. It’s great to be able to have that kind of functionality without having to build it yourself. You almost surely aren’t in the avatar cropping business, you’re in your own unique business that just happens to have users with avatars. I’ve said it before: But let’s up the ante a little bit here. What if you need to get an entirely different document format out of another document? How about the hardest document…

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The web can be anything we want it to be

I really enjoyed this chat between Bruce Lawson and Mustafa Kurtuldu where they talked about browser support and the health of the web. Bruce expands upon a lot of the thoughts in a post he wrote last year called World Wide Web, Not Wealthy Western Web where he writes: …across the world, regardless of disposable income, regardless of hardware or network speed, people want to consume the same kinds of goods and services. And if your websites are made for the whole world, not just the wealthy Western world, then the next 4 billion people might consume the stuff that your organization makes. Another highlight is where Bruce also mentions that, as web developers, we might think that we’ve all moved on from jQuery as a community, and yet there are still millions of websites that depend upon jQuery to function properly. It’s an interesting anecdote and relevant to recent…

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How do Website Colors and Design Attract Viewers?

Studies have shown that our emotions, both positive and negative, are influenced by colors. Is your website’s color scheme optimized to bring in new traffic? Does your website design complement those colors? Check out our simple guide to see if your website’s design is costing you viewers. An eye-catching color scheme or design layout can change the face of a webpage. They can also determine whether a viewer will decide to stay around to view your content, or leave the page immediately. In short, a lot can hinge on a simple color scheme.   Do you want to find out how to use colors and designs to attract viewers and, better yet, to keep them coming back for more? In this article, our team of experts break down the latest research in color psychology to recommend the best color schemes and rules. So, read on and discover how you can…

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React Native: A Better DOM?

How do we convince web developers that React Native has already solved many of the hardest GUI problems for them? Go back in time and release React Native before React DOM? Is there an easier way… — Nicolas (@necolas) March 1, 2018 Like a lot of people in this Twitter thread, I didn’t really understand that React Native was even for building on the web. I thought it was a way to write React to build native mobile apps. Nicolas has a whole “React Native for Web” repo though, explaining otherwise. Plus a conference talk. It probably doesn’t help that the tagline is “Build native mobile apps using JavaScript and React.” I suppose, it does do that (e.g. build an iOS or Android app), but it also can build your web app, which could mean… single code base? Several of the replies suggest “a better DOM” which is interesting. Or,…

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Careful Now

Tom Warren’s “Chrome is turning into the new Internet Explorer 6” for The Verge has a title that, to us front-end web developers, suggests that Chrome is turning into a browser far behind in technology and replete with tricky bugs. Aside from the occasional offhand generic, “Chrome is getting so bad lately,” comments you hear, we know that’s not true. Chrome often leads the pack for good web tech. Instead, it’s about another equally concerning danger: developers building sites specifically for Chrome. In theory, that’s not really a thing, because if you build a website with web standards (of which there isn’t really much of an alternative) it’ll work in Chrome like any other modern web browser. But it is a thing if you build the site to somehow block other browsers and only allow Chrome. Warren: Google has been at the center of a lot of “works best with…

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Chrome is Not the Standard

Chris Krycho has written an excellent post about how us fickle web developers might sometimes confuse features that land in one browser as being “the future of the web.” However, Chris argues that there’s more than one browser’s vision of the web that we should care about: No single company gets to dominate the others in terms of setting the agenda for the web. Not Firefox, with its development and advocacy of WebAssembly, dear to my heart though that is. Not Microsoft and the IE/Edge team, with its proposal of the CSS grid spec in 2011, sad though I am that it languished for as long as it did. Not Apple, with its pitch for concurrent JavaScript. And not—however good its developer relations team is—Chrome, with any of the many ideas it’s constantly trying out, including PWAs. It’s also worth recognizing how these decisions aren’t, in almost any case, unalloyed…

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HTML Email and Accessibility

You love HTML emails, don’t you? As a developer, probably not… but subscribers absolutely do. They devour them, consume them on every device known to man, and drive a hell of a lot of revenue for companies that take their email marketing seriously. But most web developers tasked with building HTML emails merely want to get them out the door as quickly as possible and move on to more interesting assignments. Despite email’s perennial value for subscribers, tight timelines, and a general loathing of the work result in things falling by the wayside; and, just like in the web world, one of the first things to be set aside in email is accessibility. I think we all agree that accessibility is a vital topic. Unfortunately, it’s one that’s ignored in the email marketing world even more than on the web. Accessibility in email doesn’t have to consume a lot of…

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Apple’s Proposal for HTML Template Instantiation

I’m sure I don’t have the expertise to understand the finer nuances of this, but I like the spirit: The HTML5 specification defines the template element but doesn’t provide a native mechanism to instantiate it with some parts of it substituted, conditionally included, or repeated based on JavaScript values — as popular JavaScript frameworks such as Ember.js and Angular allow. As a consequence, there are many incompatible template syntaxes and semantics to do substitution and conditionals within templates — making it hard for web developers to combine otherwise reusable components when they use different templating libraries. Whilst previously we all decided to focus on shadow DOM and the custom-elements API first, we think the time is right — now that shadow DOM and custom-elements API have been shipping in Safari and Chrome and are in development in Firefox — to propose and standardize an API to instantiate HTML templates. Let…

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Freelance Art Director / Designer – Fountain City – Remote

Familiarity working with information architects, project managers and web developers. We’re a full service agency that provides marketing, design, and technical… $65 – $85 an hourFrom Indeed – Tue, 17 Oct 2017 15:10:44 GMT – View all Remote jobs Source: http://rss.indeed.com/rss?q=Drupal+Developer

Junior Web Developer – Fresno Pacific University – California

Experience developing on Drupal CMS. This position works closely with our web developers and marketing teams….From Fresno Pacific University – Tue, 26 Sep 2017 04:26:57 GMT – View all California jobs Source: http://rss.indeed.com/rss?q=Drupal+Developer

Compilers are the New Frameworks

Tom Dale: Increasingly, the bytes that get shipped to browsers will bear less and less resemblance to the source code that web developers write. Indeed. I suspected the same: Because performance matters so much and there is so much opportunity to get clever with performance, we’ll see innovation in getting our code bases to production. Tools like webpack (tree shaking, code splitting) are already doing a lot here, but there is plenty of room to let automated tools work magic on how our code ultimately gets shipped to browsers. Tom also says: This is a loss in some ways (who else got their web development start with View Source?) but is a huge win for users, particularly in emerging markets. It seems to me today’s world of GitHub, StackOverflow, and the proliferation of learning resources more than make up for learning via our own website spelunking, not to mention how…

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