Category Archive for: web design and

rfp-robotRFP ROBOT: Website Request for Proposal Generator

The time has come for a new website (or website redesign), which means you need to write a website request for proposal or web RFP. A Google search produces a few examples, but they vary wildly and don’t seem to speak really to your goals for developing or redesigning a new website. You need to write a website RFP that will clearly articulate your needs and generate responses from the best website designers and developers out there. But how?

Have no fear, RFP Robot is here. He will walk you through a step-by-step process to help you work through the details of your project and create a PDF formatted website design RFP that will provide the information vendors need to write an accurate bid. RFP Robot will tell you what info you should include, point out pitfalls, and give examples.


An Event Apart

Just the other day in a Slack group I hang out in someone asked “what web design events is everyone going to and loving?” An Event Apart is always my immediate answer. I’ve gotten to speak a number of An Event Apart events, which is an incredible honor and always a good time. So from that perspective, I love it. I can tell you that it’s the most well-run conference I go to that gets all the details right. But I’ve also attended An Event Apart as a paying attendee and loved that. There is something about An Event Apart that gets the speakers to really bring their A-game, and you get to watch that A-game over and over for a couple of days. Upcoming Events in 2018: July 30 – August 1: Washington DC August 27 – 29: Chicago October 8 – 10: Orlando December 10 – 12: San…

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Your Brain on Front-End Development

Part of the job of being a front-end developer is applying different techniques and technologies to pull of the desired UI and UX. Perhaps you work with a design team and implement their designs. I know when I look at a design (heck, even if I know I’m not going to be building it), my front-end brain starts triggering all sorts of things I know will be related to the task. Let’s take a look at what I mean. Check out this lovely Dribbble shot for a Food Recipe Website from Riko Sapto Dimo. It’s a very appealing design, and there is loads in there to think about from a front-end web design and development standpoint. We’re going to mostly be talking about design pattern choices and HTML/CSS tech choices. There is much more to the job of front-end development. Accessibility! Performance! Semantics! Design systems! All important stuff as well.…

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A DevTools for Designers

There has long been an unfortunate disconnect between visual design for the web and web design and development. We’re over here designing pictures of websites, not websites – so the sentiment goes. A.J. Kandy puts a point on all this. We’re seeing a proliferation of design tools these days, all with their own leaps forward. Yet… But, critically, the majority of them aren’t web-centric. None really integrate with a modern web development workflow, not without converters or plugins anyway; and their output is not websites, but clickable simulations of websites. Still, these prototypes are, inevitably, one-way artifacts that have to be first analyzed by developers, then recreated in code. That’s just a part of what A.J. has to say, so I’d encourage you to read the whole thing. Do y’all get Clearletter, the Clearleft newsletter? It’s a good one. They made some connections here to nearly a decade of similar…

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What You Build

I tweeted this yesterday and it seemed to resonate with some folks: Just a little reminder that it’s about 100 times more important what you build than how you build it. — Chris Coyier (@chriscoyier) December 10, 2017 What I was feeling when I wrote that was a little tired of endless discussions on tech minutia and yearning for more focus on what we are building and discussion about why. If you’re a reader of this site, you and I live in the same bubble. It’s a nice bubble. It’s full of smart people who like to chat about web design and development. I live it and love it. It’s easy to get into a heated discussion about frameworks, what type of class names make the most sense, which optimization techniques are most important, or what part of your code base is should be responsible for styling. Those are great…

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CSS-Tricks Chronicle XXXII

Hey y’all! Time for a quick Chronicle post where I get to touch on and link up some of the happenings around the site that I haven’t gotten to elsewhere. Technologically around here, there have been a few small-but-interesting changes. Site search is and has been powered by Algolia the last few months. I started up writing some thoughts about that here, and it got long enough I figured I’d crack it off into it’s own blog post, so look forward to that soon. Another service I’ve started making use of is Cloudinary. Cloudinary is an image CDN, so it’s serving most of the image assets here now, and we’re squeezing as much performance out of that as we possibly can. Similar to Algolia, it has a WordPress plugin that does a lot of the heavy lifting. We’re still working out some kinks as well. If you’re interested in how…

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Strongly Held Opinions, Gone Away

I received a really wonderful question from Bryan Braun the other day during a workshop I was giving at Sparkbox. He asked if, over the years, if there were opinions about web design and development I strongly held that I don’t anymore. I really didn’t have a great answer at the time, even though surely if I could rewind my brain there would be some embarrassing ones in there. At the risk of some heavy self-back-patting, this is exactly the reason I try and be pretty open-minded. If you aren’t, you end up eating crow. And for what? When you crap on an idea, you sound like a jerk at the time, and likely cause more harm than good. If you end up right, you were still a jerk. If you end up wrong, you were a jerk and a fool. I like the sentiment the web is a big…

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Media Temple

Media Temple has always been huge supporters of the web design and development communities. They got some deals cookin’ right now to celebrate the 20th anniversary of CSS itself. Funny to think this site is just about exactly half as old as its namesake. Over on their blog, Alex Rojas rounded up some highlights of those first 20 years, and I did similarly. I’ve used Media Temple for hosting for this site, and dozens and dozens of others, throughout my years in web development. One of the things I always think about with hosting is speed. To be perfectly honest, a host can only do so much for you. As long as you’re on good hardware that is appropriate for your site, the rest of that, say 90%, is on you. You need to make good choices, write good code, do persistent monitoring, and all that. When you’re working on…

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Building Loyalty: 7 Web Design Strategies to Earn Your Audience’s Trust by @ProvenData

There are many web design and optimization strategies out there, but one that is underrated is creating trust with your audience. Learn how to create trust with your audience here.The post Building Loyalty: 7 Web Design Strategies to Earn Your Audience’s Trust by @ProvenData appeared first on Search Engine Journal. Source: https://www.searchenginejournal.com/feed/

How Will the Voice Search ‘Revolution’ Impact Web Design?

Voice search is getting a lot of attention right now and it’s no big surprise. The big tech firms are pushing their voice platforms hard and marketers are hyping them up to disrupt the entire industry. Needless to say, voice search is one of the hottest topics in digital technologies right now and this isn’t going to change anytime soon. Despite all this, the rise of voice search isn’t going to have the impact on web design and marketing most are predicting right now. The thing is, voice technology comes with some fundamental limitations that mean its role in the consumer journey (where designer, marketers and the rest of us make our money) will be relatively small. Voice search sucks at selling Amazon CEO Jeff Bezos featured in a recent article here debunking the clickbait notion that homepage design is dead (another BS trend). He’s a smart guy, there’s no question about that.…

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Real CSS Tweets (Vol. I)

We be tweetin’ all the time about web design and development stuff. In fact, @Real_CSS_Tricks, the official Twitter account for this site, is largely just an outgoing airhorn for the stuff we publish here and interesting things elsewhere. The human beings that operate this site have their own accounts. It’s pretty interesting to see which tweets take off! Here’s a list of the most popular tweets in the last year or so. Wanna see a decent little slider in a handful of lines of code? pic.twitter.com/zOsN4mhRFw — CSS-Tricks (@Real_CSS_Tricks) October 23, 2016 That one turned into a blog post and demo. Loads of icons you can make with a single element (and pseudos)https://t.co/s3VyHj2P11 pic.twitter.com/mlIkyjc86w — CSS-Tricks (@Real_CSS_Tricks) October 16, 2016 I’d say SVG is normally the best fit for this kind of thing, but this is a damn impressive experiment. I like the websites interface in how you can hover…

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Cars with Broken Windshield Wipers

I was stopped at an intersection the other day. It was raining. The road on the other side sloped upwards, so I could see the stopped cars on the other side of the road kind of stadium-seating style. I could see all their windshield wipers going all at the same time, all out-of-sync with each other. Plus a few of them had seemingly kinda broken ones that flapped at awkward times and angles. What does that have to do with web design and development? Nothing really, other than that I took the scene as inspiration to create something, and it ended up being an interesting hodgepodge of “tricks”. See the Pen Cars with Weird Windshield Wipers by Chris Coyier (@chriscoyier) on CodePen. It’s SVG When you need a little shape like a car, nothing beats The Noun Project. I actually used the little Mac app they have and dragged the…

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