Category Archive for: sustainable

rfp-robotRFP ROBOT: Website Request for Proposal Generator

The time has come for a new website (or website redesign), which means you need to write a website request for proposal or web RFP. A Google search produces a few examples, but they vary wildly and don’t seem to speak really to your goals for developing or redesigning a new website. You need to write a website RFP that will clearly articulate your needs and generate responses from the best website designers and developers out there. But how?

Have no fear, RFP Robot is here. He will walk you through a step-by-step process to help you work through the details of your project and create a PDF formatted website design RFP that will provide the information vendors need to write an accurate bid. RFP Robot will tell you what info you should include, point out pitfalls, and give examples.


Our new book “It Doesn’t Have to Be Crazy at Work” is out!

Now available in the US, Canada, the UK, Austrailia, and New Zealand. Other countries and languages will follow.A couple years in the making, our brand new book, “It Doesn’t Have to Be Crazy at Work”, is now available in bookstores near you. There’s a hardcover, paperback (UK markets), audiobook, and ebook.The Economist says…“Their book is funny, well-written and iconoclastic and by far the best thing on management published this year.”800ceoread calls it an Editor’s Choice and says……Each [short chapter is] packed with a punch that seems both profound and practical — profound for how clear and different they tend to be from most accepted business wisdom, and practical because almost everything they describe is immediately applicable.And the ⭐️⭐️⭐️⭐️⭐️ Amazon reviews are flowing in as well. And, BTW, if you’ve read the book, please do leave a review. Thanks much.If you’ve read and enjoyed REWORK, you’re going to especially love “It Doesn’t Have to be Crazy at Work”.…

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Basecamp is hiring a data analyst

Come work with us!Basecamp is hiring a data analyst to help us make better decisions in all areas of the business. This includes everything from running A/B tests with statistical rigor to forecasting revenue for the year to tracing performance problems to analyzing usage patterns.We’re looking for an experienced candidate who’s done similar work elsewhere (as you’ll be the only one at Basecamp with this specialty). But nobody hits the ground running. You won’t be able to answer every question immediately or know how all the systems work on day one — and we don’t expect you to.We want strong, diverse teams built from different backgrounds, experiences and identities. We’re ready for the ongoing work that goes into building an inclusive, supportive place for you to do the best work of your career. That starts with working no more than 40 hours a week on a regular basis and getting 8+ hours of sleep…

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Medium’s Time is Running Out

I’ve already said this a handful of times, but, I’m going to say it plainly: Medium is a risk to your long-term publishing needs. In fact, Medium.com, ultimately, will not last. This doesn’t mean that it’ll disappear tomorrow… or that it’ll disappear in 10 years… but, it will eventually be replaced and you’ll have to migrate the 10’s… 100’s… 1,000’s of blog posts that you’ve committed to it. Might as well own your content on your own platform outright, now, instead of later. That’s why I suggest choosing something like WordPress (here’s a post on migration) because it’s completely sustainable. And, you don’t necessarily have to use a self-hosted (paid) solution to start – use WordPress.com and go from there. I was reminded of this recently because Medium has killed the ability to use custom domains, which, is insane to me considering how many people moved over for that singular service itself! Big…

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Working together to promote Drupal

The Drupal community has done an amazing job organizing thousands of developers around the world. We’ve built collaboration tools and engineering processes to streamline how our community of developers work together to collectively build Drupal. This collaboration has led to amazing results. Today, more than 1 in 40 of the top one million websites use Drupal. It’s inspiring to see how many organizations depend on Drupal to deliver their missions. What is equally incredible is that historically, we haven’t collaborated around the marketing of Drupal. Different organizations have marketed Drupal in their own way without central coordination or collaboration. In my DrupalCon Nashville keynote, I shared that it’s time to make a serious and focused effort to amplify Drupal success stories in the marketplace. Imagine what could happen if we enabled hundreds of marketers to collaborate on the promotion of Drupal, much like we have enabled thousands of developers to…

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Exclusive Freebie: Start Up Icons

Every day there’s a new opportunity, a new venue & new horizons for the entrepreneurs with the aim to make it happen, that’s why we’re looking to help: check out the latest free icons pack from Iconshock.com & bypeople.com: 30 unique items, including vector Adobe Illustrator & SVG Files, also adding PNG’s in three different sizes. All the icons in this pack are free for both personal and commercial projects, so you won’t find any limits to focus on the important: make your business profitable and sustainable! Get these amazing icons from here The post Exclusive Freebie: Start Up Icons appeared first on Inspired Magazine. Source: inspiredm.com

TTT: The History of Viget’s Quarterly Retreats

Viget was founded in December 1999 during the peak of the original dot com bubble.  At the time, I was working in a company where our CEO regularly slept on the couch in his office, late nights were routine, and nearly every client — and indeed the company itself — seemed to be racing feverishly to an exit.  That company was acquired just a few years into its existence — a successful outcome for many — and an experience I’ll always appreciate. With Viget, we never wanted a sprint.  We viewed our journey as a marathon. We set out to build a better digital world, figuring it would be a century for the internet revolution to run its course, and decades for us to do our part.  When you’re executing a multi-decade plan, a sustainable pace matters. Our first Third Thursday meeting happened sometime in 2000, after we moved out…

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Mollom: The story of my first SaaS startup

Last month, Acquia discontinued service and support for Mollom, the spam service I started more than ten years ago. As a goodbye, I want to share the untold story of how I founded Mollom. In 2007, I read Tim Ferriss’ book The 4-Hour Work Week, and was hooked. The book provides a blueprint for how entrepreneurs can structure and build a business to fund the lifestyle of their dreams. It’s based on Ferriss’ own experience; he streamlined his business, automated systems and outsourced tasks until it was not only more profitable, but also took less of his time to operate. The process of automation and outsourcing was so efficient, Ferriss only spent four hours a week to run his business; this gave him time and freedom to take “mini-retirements”, travel the world, and write a book. When I first read Ferriss’ book, I was inspired by the idea of simultaneously…

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The world needs more modest, linear growth companies. Please make some.

14 years of linear growth at Basecamp.Exponential growth gets all the glory. Every startup story that lands on the cover of a magazine has a hockey-stick chart to flaunt. Yes, disruption is driven by such violent expansion, and the world needs some disruption some of the time. But for the other 360 days out of the year, what it also needs is some modest, linear growth.Linear growth is what happens in domains that aren’t animated by network effects (and when no artificial growth hormones are injected!). It’s the simplicity of good products sold at reasonable prices that find happy customers. These customers talk to friends and colleagues in other businesses, and over time that word of mouth spreads the good vibes, which turns the business up.But the limelight has no patience with such simple, slow methods as word of mouth. It’s not infectious enough. Not exponential enough. That’s a shame.Because the world is…

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How to tell if a CEO is worth working for

If you’re looking to leave your company to work for another, you’ll want to consider this.A few months ago, someone asked me for advice about potentially leaving one company to go work for another. He was curious what factors he should consider before making the decision.He’d already vetted the role, the company, and the offer itself — all important aspects to consider. But I told him, in my opinion, the most crucial thing to vet is the CEO.If you’re about to join a new company, you must figure out:“Do I believe in the CEO?”No company is successful with a CEO who can’t communicate, who can’t get everyone on the same page, who can’t hire well, and who can’t chart out a vision.Personally, I remember interviewing at one of my first job out of college, and I remember it being really hard to tell if a CEO is “good” or not.Plenty of CEOs sound like they’d be a good…

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Building a Sustainable Model for Drupal Contrib Module Development

Matt and Mike talk with Webform 8.5.x creator Jacob Rockowitz, #D8Rules initiative member Josef Dabernig, and WordPress (and former Drupal) developer Chris Wiegman about keeping Drupal’s contrib ecosystem sustainable by enabling module creators to benefit financially from their development. Source: https://www.lullabot.com

To Meet or Not to Meet…That is the Question

One of the most frequent dilemmas I experience as a Digital Project Manager (DPM) is whether something warrants having a meeting…and if it does, who do I invite? Nobody likes having too many meetings, especially if they aren’t valuable, but we also don’t want to have epic Slack or Basecamp threads on one topic that could have been easily resolved with a quick meeting. That balancing act is tricky, but it’s important. When you find the right balance and schedule meetings for your team only when they are needed, you will likely see a couple of benefits. First, there will be a higher level of engagement within the meetings and second, the team may experience a positive morale boost given they are able to better focus on their work. Here are four things I consider when deciding whether to schedule a meeting or not, and four things I consider when…

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On Achieving Sustainable Income

I’m experimenting with Patreon (and it’s pronounced “patron” for those that didn’t know…) for my brother’s growing cryptocurrency community and I find their model (and their tooling) to be very good. I also particularly like their mission which is simple, digestible, and easy to understand (but also really exciting and measurable): Help every creator in the world achieve sustainable income. This is exactly what we’re trying to do and it’s exactly why we decided to investigate the platform and system to see if what they had created was worth the time and investment to put together. The world is changing and the opportunity for independent creators to live sustainably is bigger and more possible than it has ever been. Technology like Patreon appears to be leading the way and I’m excited to dive into the system and put it to good use (also their API as well…). There’s something inside all of…

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Sharing to Medium Publications

Something that I’ve been doing for a little bit of time is sharing my content that I create to other Medium Publications. I was, at first, a bit anxious when the first publication requested to use my content and I declined invitations for a long time before I finally said “Yes” to one. Now, a good portion of the content that I write not only goes to my Medium.com profile (via a very handy and simple WordPress plugin) but many of the posts get submitted to other, much-larger publications. One that got published last night was in the queue for nearly 6 months before it finally went public: via Free Code Camp! I wrote the original on March 16th and submitted it for review. Now, Free Code Camp is one of the largest publications in Medium with over 300,000 subscribers. Nice. Consequently, it gets a lot of attention and press and…

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How we pay people at Basecamp

It’s just better business to pay people fairlyThere are no negotiated salaries or raises at Basecamp. Everyone in the same role at the same level is paid the same. Equal work, equal pay.We assess new hires on a scale that goes from junior programmer, to programmer, to senior programmer, to lead programmer, to principal programmer (or designer or customer support or ops…) We use the same scale to assess when someone is in line for a promotion.Raises happen automatically, once per year, when we review market rates. Our target is to pay everyone at the company in the 95th percentile, or top 5%, of the market, regardless of their role. So whether you work in customer support or ops or programming or design, you’ll be paid in the top 5% for that position.If someone is below that target, they get a raise large enough to match the target. If someone is already…

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Chicago, Be Chicago

Yuck! Enough with the Silicon Valley worship, Chicago!🎶Hey, Chicago, what do you say? Can we stop talking about wanting to be the next Silicon Valley today?🎶If you pay attention to the Chicago tech/media scene, you’ve probably been hearing for years that Chicago is poised to be the next Silicon Valley. The storyline continues in this recent Inc article: Why Chicago will be the next Silicon Valley tech hub.There’s a lot of good in this article. And we’re honored that Basecamp is held up as an example of something positive happening in Chicago. But the notion that it’s now Chicago’s time to grab someone else’s torch is where it falls apart for me.It’s certainly true there’s more entrepreneurial excitement in Chicago these days. More optimism, more opportunity, etc. This is great.But what’s with all this this fetishizing of Silicon Valley? To be next in line to be them? What about being us? What about being original?…

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Trickle-down workaholism in startups

“And then I said anyone not willing to break their backs working for me was a tourist!”If you want to understand why so many startups become infected with unhealthy work habits, or outright workaholism, a good place to start your examination is in the attitudes of their venture capital investors.Consider this Twitter thread involving two famous VCs, Keith Rabois and Mark Suster:These sentiments are hardly aberrations. There’s an ingrained mythology around startups that not only celebrates burn-out efforts, but damn well requires it. It’s the logical outcome of trying to compress a lifetime’s worth of work into the abbreviated timeline of a venture fund.It’s not hard to understand why such a mythology serves the interest of money men who spread their bets wide and only succeed when unicorns emerge. Of course they’re going to desire fairytale sacrifices. There’s little to no consequence to them if the many fall by the wayside, spent…

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Launch: Our Knowledge Center!

I’ve always believed that getting to know your company better requires more than using a piece of software alone. Yes, Know Your Company has been helpful to thousands of people all over the world…But if you want to foster a sustainable culture of feedback within your team, you have to change how you do things day in, day out. You have to shift your mindset. You have to practice a methodology.We’ve spent the past three years developing that methodology. And finally, we created a resource to share it with you.Today, we’re launching our brand new Knowledge Center — a place for every employee, manager and CEO to learn our methodology on how to cultivate open, honest workplace environments.Based on insights and data we’ve collected from over 15,000 employees at hundreds of companies in 25 countries, we’ve distilled all our learnings into 21 chapters I’ve written for our Knowledge Center.These chapters are organized into six…

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I live my podcast life a quarter hour at a time

How we found our ideal episode length for The DistanceIn the communities of podcasters and aspiring podcasters that I frequent on Facebook and elsewhere, a frequent topic of debate is the ideal length of an episodes—25 minutes? An hour? I also get asked from time to time how we came up with 15 minutes for The Distance. I’d love to tell you that we thoughtfully deliberated episode length during the planning process for the show, drawing on years of collective storytelling experience to arrive at our decision, but the truth is that the 15-minute guideline just kind of happened—and then became a useful constraint that’s guided our production ever since.The Distance started in 2014 as longform written stories of about 2,500 words each. At the end of that year, as Serial was wrapping up its first season, we started talking about trying audio for our stories about long-running businesses. The consensus was…

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What Not to Wearable: Part 1

With every advance in connected technology, potential new features abound. Sensors monitor your fitness performance or sleep quality. Haptic vibrations in insoles guide you to take a left or a right, allowing you to navigate without looking at a screen. NFC technology in a ring allows you to pay for a purchase without fumbling around in a bag or combing through pockets. These technologies allow our accessories to become devices for input and output. All this sounds exciting, freeing even. These innovations could allow us to turn our focus away from screens and back to the material world, to be simultaneously connected to technology while also present in the moment. And that’s incredible. However, this also presents new challenges. Besides the multitude of complex technical problems we must address, from charging and battery life to data networks and security, we will also have to solve some key strategic and design problems. When Fashion and Tech Collide Connected technology has migrated from appliances,…

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