Category Archive for: RID

rfp-robotRFP ROBOT: Website Request for Proposal Generator

The time has come for a new website (or website redesign), which means you need to write a website request for proposal or web RFP. A Google search produces a few examples, but they vary wildly and don’t seem to speak really to your goals for developing or redesigning a new website. You need to write a website RFP that will clearly articulate your needs and generate responses from the best website designers and developers out there. But how?

Have no fear, RFP Robot is here. He will walk you through a step-by-step process to help you work through the details of your project and create a PDF formatted website design RFP that will provide the information vendors need to write an accurate bid. RFP Robot will tell you what info you should include, point out pitfalls, and give examples.


How to Deal with the AJAX Loading Error: Not Found Error

Did you ever face the dreaded “AJAX Loading Error: Not Found” error message when trying to update your Joomla site using the “Joomla! Update” core component?    In this tutorial, you will learn a few tips helping your to get rid of this error and smoothly run your Joomla update.   [[ This is a content summary only. Visit http://OSTraining.com for full links, other content, and more! ]] Source: https://www.ostraining.com/

Marketing Design — How we improved our conversion rate at Highrise

Originally Highrise was built for Jason and David, the founders of Basecamp, who had trouble staying on top of who was talking to the lawyer, who needed to follow up with the landlord, what was said to the reporter, etc.But do our customers look like Jason and David?Maybe they did originally but things changed over the last decade Highrise has been in business? Is that still our reason for existing? So we recently did a series of Jobs-to-be-Done interviews to understand who uses Highrise at a deeper level.The results were clarifying.Our interviews uncovered that Highrise was now in the hands of a very different group of people with very different needs. It’s less about “Contacts” and more about “Leads” someone needs to get into a sales process. It’s less about “Todos” and “Tasks” and more about “I need a reminder to follow-up with this lead in a few weeks.” But that’s just…

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Steeped in History

Dim sum at Nom WahNom Wah Tea Parlor is New York Chinatown’s oldest dim sum restaurant. For decades, it served Cantonese dumplings and rolls in the traditional way, from trolleys pushed around the restaurant. When Wilson Tang took over Nom Wah in 2011, he switched from trolleys to menus with pictures and started serving dim sum through dinner. He also opened new locations that broadened Nom Wah’s repertoire beyond dim sum. These were big changes for a restaurant that opened in 1920, but Wilson saw them as measures to secure Nom Wah’s future for its next century in business.https://medium.com/media/a72379af33c3dd5da1b0e0603fc675f1/hrefTranscript(Sound of restaurant)WAILIN WONG: Wilson Tang is a native New Yorker and a Chinatown kid. On weekend mornings, his family would head to Chinatown in lower Manhattan for dim sum. It’s a Cantonese meal consisting of small dishes traditionally served from trolleys that servers push around the restaurant. There’s dumplings, rolls and buns,…

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ECMAScript Modules in Browsers

As Jake Archibald says, they are starting to land! The support landscape is already: Safari 10.1. Chrome Canary 60 – behind the Experimental Web Platform flag in chrome:flags. Firefox 54 – behind the dom.moduleScripts.enabled setting in about:config. Edge 15 – behind the Experimental JavaScript Features setting in about:flags. There are plenty of weird gotchas to be aware of, like minor syntax things that are intentionally not supported, and the order of script execution. We covered Stefan Judis’s post, who’s sure we’ll continue to bundle: Just because we might have support for ES6 modules in browsers soon, it doesn’t mean that we can get rid of a build process and a proper “bundle strategy”. But there are folks who wish all this wasn’t so complicated, like Pawel Grzybek: Three things that I wish I could ditch from my everyday front-end workflow: CSS preprocessors, JavaScript transpilers and module bundlers. Direct Link to…

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The 9 questions that uncover the most surprising insights from employees

I’m sharing three years-worth of findings, based on data from 15,000 employees in 15+ countries through Know Your Company…When’s the last time you had a one-on-one or performance review with an employee… and you learned something completely new?Don’t think too hard 🙂 If you’re like most CEOs and managers, getting new, surprising insights from employees doesn’t happen very often. Oftentimes, when we’re asking for honest feedback, we simply receive a confirmation of what we want to hear.We learn, “Oh okay, it seems like everything is fine” or “I already knew that was an issue, so it’s all good there.”But what about the stuff you don’t know? How do you discern if an employee has an idea to improve the company that she hasn’t brought up yet? How do you figure out if an employee is frustrated with her manager? Or, how can you tell if she’s thinking about leaving?That’s where we at Know Your Company…

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The 5 Best Email Tracking Tools: Know When Your Email Has Been Opened

When it comes to your business or your job, being able to monitor as many factors as possible is typically a good thing. Google Analytics allows you to track how many visitors are coming to your site, for example, enabling you to know which channels are sending the most traffic to you and what content is performing best. Email tracking is another great example of a tool that can give you great insight into an important part of your business. There are a ton of tracking services available, some free and some paid for, and these are the most reliable and best email tracking tools available, so you don’t have to leave this important part of your business to guesswork. While social media marketing is growing in importance and popularity as a medium to distribute information to users, email is a crucial form of both information distribution and personal contact…

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Contact Form Design Tricks To Improve Lead Conversion Rate

As online marketers, your major focus is probably on generating leads, engaging, and converting them to potential customers. Most of the time, your objective is to attract and inform them. For this reason, you need to give priority to optimizing and modifying your contact form design to maximize your conversion. There is not much difference when it comes to a high-converting and a low-converting contact form. It all boils down to the details and the choice of contact form design features that can help increase your success rate of. Contact Form Design Tips There are several ways you can get maximum conversion from your contact form. Here are 10 research-based tips and best practices on improving your contact form design for better conversion rate. 1. Use The Right Layout Finding the right layout can be crucial for your contact form. A one-eye tracking study by Google revealed the following when…

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Unnecessary Qualifiers

Present without apologiesMost people struggle with confidence at times, especially in the workplace and I’m no exception. I often find myself presenting my design work and my opinions with a variety of qualifiers, as if pointing out my perceived flaws before someone else can will negate them. This is just as much a reminder to myself as it is to anyone else, but please, present your work without apologies.Here are a bunch of unnecessary qualifiers and why they’re unnecessary. When I find myself typing one of these, I take a step back, read over what I was trying to say, and rewrite…Don’t say these things:IMO (in my opinion)Obviously it’s your opinion, you are saying it. If it’s not your opinion then it’d be appropiate to mention whose opinion it actually is.IMHO (in my humble opinion)This sounds particularly apologetic, don’t do it. And by the way, calling yourself humble is not humble.“Not to be that…

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Creating a Book Cover Using JavaScript and p5.js

I recently published a book and an interactive course called Coding for Visual Learners. It teaches coding to beginners from scratch using the widely popular JavaScript programming language and the p5.js programming library. Since p5.js a great and an easy to use drawing library, I wanted to make use of it to create the cover of my book and course as well. This is a tutorial on how to create this particular visual using JavaScript and p5.js. p5.js is a drawing & creative coding library that is based on the idea of sketching. Just like how sketching can be thought of as a minimal approach to drawing to quickly prototype an idea, p5.js is built on the concept of writing the minimal amount of code to translate your visual, interaction or animation ideas to the screen. p5.js is a JavaScript implementation of the popular library called Processing which is based…

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Give 40, Take 0

A manager’s job is to protect their team’s time and attention.Companies love to protect. They protect their brand with trademarks, their data and trade secrets with rules and policies, and their money with budgets, CFOs, and investments.Companies protect a lot of things, yet many of them are guilty of one glaring omission. Too often, there’s something they leave wide open and vulnerable: their employees’ time.Companies spend their employees’ time and attention as if there were an infinite supply of both. As if they cost nothing. Yet workers’ time and attention are the most precious resources we have.Employees are under siege for their time and attention. They are sliced up by an overabundance of meetings, physical distractions in open workspaces, virtual distractions on their phones, and the expectation they’re available to anyone, anytime, for anything that’s needed.If companies spent money as recklessly as they spend time, they’d be going out of business. And…

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Is Your Healthcare Site Accessible? (VIDEO)

  REMODELING FOR ACCESSIBILITY In my previous post about accessibility and hospitals, I explained why it’s so important that both the digital space and the literal space be accessible and free of barriers.  I emphasized  the physical structure of the hospital and “building it right” from the start. The reality is many of us don’t have a chance to “start fresh.” Rather, we “remodel” to make a space or design aesthetic work for us. Using an analogy from the literal space, let’s say a hospital was built in the 1970s. Retro orange fabric in a waiting room may be swapped out today on the couches for a more crisp and modern fabric. That slight design change gives that room  a whole facelift.  Or from a comfort perspective, getting rid of metal chairs for more ergonomic, cushioned chairs can impact the overall patient experience.  On structural remodels, a new “wing” may…

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An Introduction to the Reduced Motion Media Query

The open web’s success is built on interoperable technologies. The ability to control animation now exists alongside important features such as zooming content, installing extensions, enabling high contrast display, loading custom stylesheets, or disabling JavaScript. Sites all too often inundate their audiences with automatically playing, battery-draining, resource-hogging animations. The need for people being able to take back control of animations might be more prevalent than you may initially think. A brief history of Reduced Motion When it was released in 2013, iOS 7 featured a dramatic reworking of the operating system’s visuals. Changes included translucency and blurring, a more simplified “flat” user interface, and dramatic motion effects such as full-screen zooming and panning. While the new look was generally accepted, many people using the updated operating system reported experiencing motion sickness and vertigo. User interface movement didn’t correspond with users’ feeling of movement or spatial orientation, triggering the reported effects.…

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An Introduction to the Reduced Motion Media Query

The open web’s success is built on interoperable technologies. The ability to control animation now exists alongside important features such as zooming content, installing extensions, enabling high contrast display, loading custom stylesheets, or disabling JavaScript. Sites all too often inundate their audiences with automatically playing, battery-draining, resource-hogging animations. The need for people being able to take back control of animations might be more prevalent than you may initially think. A brief history of Reduced Motion When it was released in 2013, iOS 7 featured a dramatic reworking of the operating system’s visuals. Changes included translucency and blurring, a more simplified “flat” user interface, and dramatic motion effects such as full-screen zooming and panning. While the new look was generally accepted, many people using the updated operating system reported experiencing motion sickness and vertigo. User interface movement didn’t correspond with users’ feeling of movement or spatial orientation, triggering the reported effects.…

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What Really Makes a Static Site Generator?

I talk a lot about static site generators, but always about using static site generators. In most cases, it may seem like a black box. I create a template and some Markdown and out comes a fully formed HTML page. Magic! But what exactly is a static site generator? What goes on inside that black box? What kind of voodoo is this? In this post, I want to explore all of the parts that make up a static site generator. First, we’ll discuss these in a general fashion, but then we’ll take a closer look at some actual code by delving deep inside HarpJS. So, put your adventurer’s cap on and let’s start exploring. Why Harp? For two reasons. The first is that HarpJS is, by design, a very simple static site generator. It doesn’t have a lot of the features that might cause us to get lost exploring a…

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The End of the Clearfix hack?

Rachel Andrew with a clear (get it?!) explanation of display: flow-root;, including demos comparing old and new techniques. Apparently the name is still a little bit still up in the air. The whole point of it is getting rid of clearfix (although it is a bit different), or using a different/unintended property for float clearning. Every time this is brought up, there is always a well actually about how overflow: hidden; does the same (or any other property that creates a new block formatting context). Like we mentioned before, overflow has consquences totally unrelated to float clearning, like hiding shadows. All of the other methods have unrelated consequences. Direct Link to Article — Permalink The End of the Clearfix hack? is a post from CSS-Tricks Source: CssTricks

Hot or Not? Do these 3 Annoying Lead Capturing Tactics Work?

We’ve all seen them. Clicked them. Declined them. Ignored them. And then got pissed off by them. So many damn distractions; from a welcome mat to a pop-up to a slide-in, before another F-ing pop-up takes over your screen again. All before you can even read a single sentence of that blog post you came here for originally (which you already forgot what it was about). So… what gives? Does their performance override how annoying they are? Let’s see. How Pop-Ups Became a ‘Thing’ The nineties were known for many things. Chief among them: ugly denim, bad music, and Birkenstocks. (Wait – why are 90’s happening again?!) Tripod.com was one of the early ‘dot com’ companies who relied almost exclusively on advertisements to bring visibility to their college graduate content and services. ‘Cept one day, things got… messy. Here’s a direct quote from Wikipedia that explains where the inspiration behind the banner ad came from…

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Review of My New Computer Equipment

I recently changed out just about all of my computer equipment. Nothing dramatic like #davegoeswindows, but all new gear within my relative comfort-zone. It was the first time since late 2013, and now it’s going on 2017, so I figured it was time. No surprise: I’m an Apple guy. I have been for a couple of decades now. I was pretty excited about the new MacBook Pro’s and ordered one within a few days of them coming out. Coinciding with all that, I’ve also changed out my mouse, keyboard, and monitor. None of those accessories are Apple. Partly because they’ve stopped making them (monitors), or the ones they do make kind of suck (mice, keyboards). I figured I’d review my new setup since it’s on my mind. 15-inch MacBook Pro Like I said, I hadn’t upgraded in three years. I’d like to get another three years or more out of…

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Contribution Stories: Nida Ismail Shah, The State of Hooking into Drupal

Drupal gets better when companies, organizations, and individuals build or fix something they need and then share it with the rest of us. Our community becomes better, stronger, and smarter when others take it upon themselves to make a positive difference contributing their knowledge, time, and energy to Drupal. Acquia is proud to play a part, alongside thousands of others, in some of the stories making tomorrow’s Drupal better than today’s. One of them is Nida Ismail Shah’s. Nida Ismail Shah calls his approach to technology “trying to always stay a beginner”; he feels he’s always learning and there’s always something new to get on top of. “I started learning Drupal just a couple of years ago, and like everyone else, I started with hooks … One could say that most of Drupal was about hooks back then 🙂 … Object oriented PHP now lets us work with a lot…

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