Category Archive for: plugins

rfp-robotRFP ROBOT: Website Request for Proposal Generator

The time has come for a new website (or website redesign), which means you need to write a website request for proposal or web RFP. A Google search produces a few examples, but they vary wildly and don’t seem to speak really to your goals for developing or redesigning a new website. You need to write a website RFP that will clearly articulate your needs and generate responses from the best website designers and developers out there. But how?

Have no fear, RFP Robot is here. He will walk you through a step-by-step process to help you work through the details of your project and create a PDF formatted website design RFP that will provide the information vendors need to write an accurate bid. RFP Robot will tell you what info you should include, point out pitfalls, and give examples.


A Basic WooCommerce Setup to Sell T-Shirts

WooCommerce is a powerful eCommerce solution for WordPress sites. If you’re like me, and like working with WordPress and have WordPress-powered sites already, WooCommerce is a no-brainer for helping you sell things online on those sites. But even if you don’t already have a WordPress site, WooCommerce is so good I think it would make sense to spin up a WordPress site so you could use it for your eCommerce solution. Personally, I’ve used WooCommerce a number of times to sell things. Most recently, I’ve used it to sell T-Shirts (and hats) over on CodePen. We use WordPress already to power our blog, documentation, and podcast. Makes perfect sense to use WordPress for the store as well! What I think is notable about our WooCommerce installation at CodePen is how painless it was, while doing everything we need it to do. I’d say it was a half-day job with maybe…

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ABeamer: a frame-by-frame animation framework

In a recent post, Zach Saucier demonstrated the awesome things that the DOM allows us to do, thanks to the <canvas> element. Taking a snapshot of an element and manipulating it to create an exploding animation is pretty slick and a perfect example of how far complex animations have come in the last few years. ABeamer is a new animation ecosystem that takes advantage of these new concepts. At the core of the ecosystem is the web browser animation library. But, it’s not just another animation engine. ABeamer is designed to build frame-by-frame animations in the web browser and use a render server to generate a PNG file sequence, which can ultimately be used to create an animated GIF or imported into a video editor. First, a little about what ABeamer can do A key feature is its ability to hook into remote sources. This allows us to build an…

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Top 11 WordPress Plugins for Agencies by @SEOBrock

Here are some of the top WordPress plugins you can use on your (or your clients’) websites.The post Top 11 WordPress Plugins for Agencies by @SEOBrock appeared first on Search Engine Journal. Source: https://www.searchenginejournal.com/feed/

Brizy Review: Visual Page Building Reinforced

Meta: This Brizy Page Builder review covers everything you need to know about the WordPress plugin, with focus on how it would potentially impact your business. Well, of course, we love WordPress for its usability, and most importantly, its wide array of third-party plugins optimized for pretty much everything to do with websites. Come to think of it, we could spend a fortnight comparing different plugin categories, debating about the most essential one. However, if you’re honest, you’d acknowledge that nothing comes close to web design plugins especially when it comes to ecommerce sites. Consider this. The first impression visitors have of your website is 94% related to its overall design. That’s according to a study conducted by Northumbria and Sheffield Universities. The University of Surrey, on the other hand, released a separate report revealing that users’ assessment of your business’ credibility is 75% based on the website design. And…

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Experience Express in Lisbon: Forging the Future of Drupal Architectures and Initiatives at Drupal Developer Days

In Lisbon, steep slopes and sweeping vistas towering over placid waters and crowded ports characterize the topography of one of the most beautiful cities in Europe. This year, the Portuguese capital played host to Drupal Developer Days, possibly the most important event for developers specializing in Drupal. Held at the University Institute of Lisbon, it was a conference not to be missed, with innumerable insights from Drupal core contributors and maintainers. As the summer reaches its peak and beachgoers throng the seaside, the Experience Express stopped in this beach-filled city to sit and sprint with developers as they improve Drupal on many different fronts. In this blog post, we take a tour through some of the most compelling talks, covering topics like decoupled Drupal, progress in core initiatives, and dynamic migrations. Should Drupal 9 be decoupled by design? I joined forces with Lauri Eskola (Senior Front-end Developer at Acquia) to…

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The Four Big Ways Jetpack Helps with Image Performance

We’ve been working with Jetpack around here as a sponsor. It’s a great match because as someone with a bunch of self-hosted WordPress sites, Jetpack is one of those no-brainer plugins for me. Jetpack can do a ton of good things for any site in a variety of very different ways. Here’s one way to think about it: it brings the power of WordPress’ own massive servers to you. For now, let’s just focus on one angle of what Jetpack can do for you: image performance. Jetpack does a ton for you in this regard, solving some non-trivial performance upgrades. Let’s take a look at what I see as the four big boosts you get from Jetpack on your images. 1) WordPress does responsive images for you OK, I cheated with the first one because you don’t actually need Jetpack to benefit from this. But it’s an important and foundational…

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A plan for Drupal and Composer

At DrupalCon Nashville, we launched a strategic initiative to improve support for Composer in Drupal 8. To learn more, you can watch the recording of my DrupalCon Nashville keynote or read the Composer Initiative issue on Drupal.org. While Composer isn’t required when using Drupal core, many Drupal site builders use it as the preferred way of assembling websites (myself included). A growing number of contributed modules also require the use of Composer, which increases the need to make Composer easier to use with Drupal. The first step of the Composer Initiative was to develop a plan to simplify Drupal’s Composer experience. Since DrupalCon Nashville, Mixologic, Mile23, Bojanz, Webflo, and other Drupal community members have worked on this plan. I was excited to see that last week, they shared their proposal. The first phase of the proposal is focused on a series of changes in the main Drupal core repository. The…

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The OSTraining Podcast #25: Beka Rice on eCommerce and the GDPR

Some people have scanned a few blog posts about the GDPR. Very few people have researched it deeply and really know what they’re talking about. Beka Rice is firmly in the latter group. Beka works for SkyVerge, who develop WooCommerce and Shopify plugins, plus Jilt, which helps stores to recover abandoned carts. I spoke with Beka on the day that the GDPR law launched. [[ This is a content summary only. Visit http://OSTraining.com for full links, other content, and more! ]] Source: https://www.ostraining.com/

Developing a design environment

Jules Forrest discusses some of the work that her team at Credit Karma has been up to when it comes to design systems. Jules writes: …in most engineering organizations, you spend your whole first day setting up your development environment so you can actually ship code. It’s generally pretty tedious and no one likes doing it, but it’s this thing you do to contribute meaningful work to production. Which got me thinking, what would it look like to make it easier for designers to design for production? That’s what Jules calls a “design environment” and she’s even written a whole bunch of documentation in Thread, Credit Karma’s design system, for designers on their team to get that design environment up and running. That’s stuff like fonts, Sketch plugins, and other useful assets: These problems have certainly been tackled by other teams in the past but this is the first time…

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Learning Gutenberg: Building Our Custom Card Block

We’ve got some base knowledge, we’ve played with some React and now we’ve got our project tools set up. Let’s dive into building our custom block. Article Series: Series Introduction What is Gutenberg, Anyway? A Primer with create-guten-block Modern JavaScript Syntax React 101 Setting up a Custom webpack A Custom “Card” Block (This Post) What we’re building We’re going to build a custom card block that features an image, a title and a summary. It’s a really common design pattern in the web and it also let’s us look at some core Gutenberg components, along with core WordPress elements, such as the Media Library. We’ll also play with some display logic with JSX for the front-end markup. Our glorious custom card block! Our glorious custom card block! We’re going to focus solely on the CMS aspect of this block in this tutorial. What it renders is some nice, clean markup…

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Learning Gutenberg: Setting up a Custom webpack Config

Gutenberg introduces the modern JavaScript stack into the WordPress ecosystem, which means some new tooling should be learned. Although tools like create-guten-block are incredibly useful, it’s also handy to know what’s going on under the hood. Article Series: Series Introduction What is Gutenberg, Anyway? A Primer with create-guten-block Modern JavaScript Syntax React 101 Setting up a Custom webpack (This Post) A Custom “Card” Block (Coming Soon!) The files we will be configuring here should be familiar from what we covered in the Part 2 Primer with create-guten-block. If you’re like me (before reading Andy’s tutorial, that is!) and would rather not dive into the configuration part just yet, the scaffold created by create-guten-block matches what we are about to create here, so you can certainly use that as well. Let’s jump in! Getting started Webpack takes the small, modular aspects of your front-end codebase and smooshes them down into one…

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The Top 12 WordPress Themes for Sports Websites

WordPress is the most popular blogging system in the world today. Developed by the WordPress Foundation, it was released in May 2003 to widespread acclaim. One of the key factors behind the success of WordPress is that it has a built-in template system. This allows users to easily switch between pre-made themes that change the look and feel of their website. Themes are essentially user-created templates that WordPress administrators can freely access (or purchase) for their own website. Once installed, the appearance of the website changes as the PHP, HTML, and CSS makeup of the page are reconfigured. WordPress themes make it easy to launch your own personalized website. Whether your website is all about political affairs or the latest financial market speculation, there are WordPress themes that can appeal to your target demographic. If you want to build a sports-related website, WordPress is the platform for you. With hundreds…

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Five of My Favorite Features of Jetpack

Jetpack is an official WordPress plugin directly from Automattic. It’s an interesting plugin in that it doesn’t just do *one thing* — it does a whole slew of things that enhance what your WordPress site can do. *Any* WordPress site, that is, and often with extremely little effort. Those easy win features Jesse Friedman calls light switch features, meaning you literally flip a switch in Jetpack’s settings and start benefitting. I love that. There are dozens of features in Jetpack, and I personally make use of most of them and see the benefit in all of them. Allow me to share with you five of my favorites and how they are actively used right here on this site. It’s actually a bit hard to pick, so perhaps I’ll do this again sometime! 1) Related Posts This seems like such a simple little feature, but it’s anything but. Something has to…

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How to Find a Translatable WordPress Plugin

If you’re building a multilingual WordPress site, there are four things you need to find translations for: The WordPress core Your content Your theme Your plugins In a previous tutorial, we took a look at how to find a multilingual theme. In this guide, we’re going to take a look at how to find multilingual plugins. Not every plugin has been translated or is capable of being translated. [[ This is a content summary only. Visit http://OSTraining.com for full links, other content, and more! ]] Source: https://www.ostraining.com/

Turn Sublime Text 3 into a JavaScript IDE

Sublime Text is one of the most popular editors for web development and software development in general. It’s very smooth and fast compared to other editors (being written in C++ helps that speed). Sublime also has tons of plugins you can find through Package Control. But it’s only a text editor and not an IDE. An IDE is a software application that provides comprehensive facilities to computer programmers for software development. In fact, Sublime doesn’t offer features like debugging tools, built-in tools for compiling and running applications, intelligent code suggestions, or code refactoring. Instead it offers a set of APIs you can use to extend it. Here’s an introduction to the JavaScript Enhancement plugin (my own creation) that makes Sublime a bit more IDE-like for JavaScript development. What is the JavaScript Enhancement Plugin? It is a plugin for Sublime Text 3 that offers a lot of features useful for creating,…

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New Class: How to Build Multilingual WordPress Websites

This week’s new class is a guide to building WordPress sites in multiple languages. “How to Build Multilingual WordPress Websites” will help you create a single site with content in more than one language. Did you know that around half of WordPress sites are non-English? That number is only going to increase in the next few years? This class will help you get conformtable with the international side of WordPress. Watch these videos and you’ll learn to translate the WordPress core, plus themes and plugins. You’ll also see how to use WPML, the most popular plugin for multilingual WordPress sites. [[ This is a content summary only. Visit http://OSTraining.com for full links, other content, and more! ]] Source: https://www.ostraining.com/

Summer Information Technology Web Intern – Lawrence University of Wisconsin – Appleton, WI

Familiarity with Content Management Systems (especially Drupal and WordPress) a plus. Develop modules/plugins and themes for a variety of systems, including…From Lawrence University of Wisconsin – Thu, 26 Apr 2018 06:23:14 GMT – View all Appleton, WI jobs Source: http://rss.indeed.com/rss?q=Drupal+Developer

Kinsta

(This is a sponsored post.)Huge thanks to Kinsta for sponsoring CSS-Tricks this week! We’re big fans of WordPress around here, and know some of you out there are too. So this might come of interest: Kinsta is WordPress hosting that runs on Google Cloud Platform. And in fact, it’s officially recommended by Google Cloud for fully-managed WordPress hosting. What does that matter? Well, when you go with a cloud host you’re entering a new realm of reliability. For example, your site is run in its own isolated container, including all the software required to run it. Familiar stuff like PHP, MySQL, and Nginx. Those resources are 100% private and not shared between anyone else – not even other sites of yours. Spinning up a site is incredibly easy from their nice dashboard You aren’t on your own here. Yes, you’re using powerful low-level infrastructure from Google Cloud Platform, but you…

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