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Category Archive for: performance

rfp-robotRFP ROBOT: Website Request for Proposal Generator

The time has come for a new website (or website redesign), which means you need to write a website request for proposal or web RFP. A Google search produces a few examples, but they vary wildly and don’t seem to speak really to your goals for developing or redesigning a new website. You need to write a website RFP that will clearly articulate your needs and generate responses from the best website designers and developers out there. But how?

Have no fear, RFP Robot is here. He will walk you through a step-by-step process to help you work through the details of your project and create a PDF formatted website design RFP that will provide the information vendors need to write an accurate bid. RFP Robot will tell you what info you should include, point out pitfalls, and give examples.


12 Steps for Conducting a Successful Social Media Audit by @lisabuyer

A social media audit is equivalent to a marketing health and wellness check-up. It’s an opportunity to proactively check the vitals, DNA, circulation, deficiencies, activity levels of your social media efforts. Auditing the performance and outcome of your social media marketing gives insights on how your brand compares to the size, weight, reach and influence. Here’s how you can conduct a successful social media audit in 12 steps. 1. Schedule It Instead of waiting until a potential problem is detected or for failing results to appear, proactively schedule an audit for your brand at least two times a year. A […]The post 12 Steps for Conducting a Successful Social Media Audit by @lisabuyer appeared first on Search Engine Journal. Source: https://www.searchenginejournal.com/feed/

The Cost of JavaScript in 2018

Even though we mentioned it earlier, I thought this outstanding post by Addy Osmani all about the performance concerns of JavaScript was still worth digging into a little more. In that post, Addy touches on all aspects of perf work and how we can fix some of the most egregious issues, from setting up a budget to “Time-to-Interactive” measurements and auditing your JavaScript bundles. Embrace performance budgets and learn to live within them. For mobile, aim for a JS budget of < 170KB minified/compressed. Uncompressed this is still ~0.7MB of code. Budgets are critical to success, however, they can’t magically fix perf in isolation. Team culture, structure and enforcement matter. Building without a budget invites performance regressions and failure. Super specific and super practical! Surprisingly, Addy mentions that “the median webpage today currently ships about 350KB of minified and compressed JavaScript,” which seems like an awful lot lower than I’d…

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Browser painting and considerations for web performance

The process of a web browser turning HTML, CSS, and JavaScript into a finished visual representation is quite complex and involves a good bit of magic. Here’s a simplified set of steps the browser goes through: Browser creates the DOM and CSSOM. Browser creates the render tree, where the DOM and styles from the CSSOM are taken into account (display: none elements are avoided). Browser computes the geometry of the layout and its elements based on the render tree. Browser paints pixel by pixel to create the visual representation we see on the screen. In this article, I’d like to focus on the last part: painting. All of those steps combined is a lot of work for a browser to do on load… and actually, not just on load, but any time the DOM (or CSSOM) is changed. That’s why many web developers tend to partially solve this by using…

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5 Classic Tips to Write Effective Google Ads Copy by @adamproehl

Incorporate these five classic principles into your PPC ad copy to boost your campaign’s performance.The post 5 Classic Tips to Write Effective Google Ads Copy by @adamproehl appeared first on Search Engine Journal. Source: https://www.searchenginejournal.com/feed/

Slow Websites

The web has grown bigger. Both in expansiveness and weight. Nick Heer’s “The Bullshit Web”: The average internet connection in the United States is about six times as fast as it was just ten years ago, but instead of making it faster to browse the same types of websites, we’re simply occupying that extra bandwidth with more stuff. Nick clearly explains what he means by bullshit, and one can see a connection to Brad Frost’s similarly framed argument. Nick talks about how each incremental interaction is a choice and connects the cruft of the web to the rise and adoption of frameworks like AMP. Ethan Marcotte paints things in a different light by looking at business incentive: …ultimately, the web’s performance problem is a problem of profitability. If we’re going to talk about bloated pages, we should do so in context: in the context of a web where digital advertising…

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Content With Purpose: How to Set Goals for Every Content Piece You Create by @BrockbankJames

Learn how to create content with a purpose, align your efforts with a single goal, and improve overall performance.The post Content With Purpose: How to Set Goals for Every Content Piece You Create by @BrockbankJames appeared first on Search Engine Journal. Source: https://www.searchenginejournal.com/feed/

Avis LWS 2018 : test complet réalisé par la rédaction

Choisir son hébergement web, c’est prendre une décision qui peut beaucoup impacter la vie et le développement de votre site internet. De ce fait, vous allez devoir vraiment vous renseigner avant de faire votre choix. Et pour cela, vous pouvez compter sur nos tests. Dans notre avis LWS, nous allons vous présenter la solution d’hébergement proposée par ce fournisseur sous toutes ses coutures, afin que vous ayez une bonne vue d’ensemble des performances offertes.  En prenant un à un les différents points qui permettent de comparer efficacement les proposition d’hébergement web du marché, nous allons analyser le positionnement de l’entreprise, et voir quelles sont ses forces et ses faiblesses. A la fin de cet avis sur LWS, vous aurez toutes les cartes pour faire votre choix !  Découvrir LWS > Résumé de notre avis LWS[wpsm_toplist h1] Introduction Commençons cet avis LWS par une courte présentation de la stratégie adoptée par…

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How to Improve Your SEO with a Topic-Driven Content Marketing Approach by @krisjonescom

This guide will help you boost your SEO performance through a topic-driven content strategy.The post How to Improve Your SEO with a Topic-Driven Content Marketing Approach by @krisjonescom appeared first on Search Engine Journal. Source: https://www.searchenginejournal.com/feed/

Managers: You’re not prepared for your one-on-one meetings. Here’s what to do.

Four steps to take when you’ve got a one-on-one meeting coming up.You’re not prepared.Or at least that’s what employees think when it comes to one-on-one meetings. In a recent survey we conducted of 125 managers and 45 employees, we found 35% of employees believe their manager is only “somewhat prepared” — and 15% of employees think their manager is “not prepared” or “not prepared at all.”That’s almost half of employees thinking that their managers aren’t as prepared for one-on-one meetings as they could be.Managers seem to agree. Sixteen percent of managers we surveyed said their biggest frustration with one-on-one meetings is they’re never sure how to prepare or what to ask.Fortunately, preparing for a one-on-one meeting is neither hard nor time-consuming. Before your next one-on-one, here are the four things you can do (and each takes ten minutes or less):#1: Get up-to-speed.You waste time when you’re not up-to-speed. When you walk into a one-on-one meeting not knowing…

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View Source

I remember seeing this Tom Dale tweet a while back. It’s literally about the browser’s ability to look at the HTML of the document you’re looking at as it first arrived. Now the tweet is stirring up a new round of conversation. Jonathan Snook has kind of a baby bear take: We have the ability to inspect the original HTML source along with its interpreted representation. We have the ability to inspect the source of JavaScript and CSS files mapped from its minified and optimized versions. We have the ability to inspect rendering pipelines. We have the ability to stop and step through JavaScript execution line by line. The increasing complexity of tools doesn’t negate the need for those earlier, simpler tools, though. The sites some build may be simple static sites, befitting of a simple View Source. The sites some build may be compiled and bundled and requiring tools…

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Building “Renderless” Vue Components

There’s this popular analogy of Vue that goes like this: Vue is what you get when React and Angular come together and make a baby. I’ve always shared this feeling. With Vue’s small learning curve, it’s no wonder so many people love it. Since Vue tries to give the developer power over components and their implementation as much as it possibly can, this sentiment has led to today’s topic. The term renderless components refers to components that don’t render anything. In this article, we’ll cover how Vue handles the rendering of a component. We’ll also see how we can use the render() function to build renderless components. You may want to know a little about Vue to get the most out of this article. If you are a newbie Sarah Drasner’s got your back. The official documentation is also a very good resource. Demystifying How Vue Renders a Component Vue…

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How Drupal continues to evolve towards an API-first platform

It’s been 12 months since my last progress report on Drupal core’s API-first initiative. Over the past year, we’ve made a lot of important progress, so I wanted to provide another update. Two and a half years ago, we shipped Drupal 8.0 with a built-in REST API. It marked the start of Drupal’s evolution to an API-first platform. Since then, each of the five new releases of Drupal 8 introduced significant web service API improvements. While I was an early advocate for adding web services to Drupal 8 five years ago, I’m even more certain about it today. Important market trends endorse this strategy, including integration with other technology solutions, the proliferation of new devices and digital channels, the growing adoption of JavaScript frameworks, and more. In fact, I believe that this functionality is so crucial to the success of Drupal, that for several years now, Acquia has sponsored one…

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Render Children in React Using Fragment or Array Components

What comes to your mind when React 16 comes up? Context? Error Boundary? Those are on point. React 16 came with those goodies and much more, but In this post, we’ll be looking at the rendering power it also introduced — namely, the ability to render children using Fragments and Array Components. These are new and really exciting concepts that came out of the React 16 release, so let’s look at them closer and get to know them. Fragments It used to be that React components could only return a single element. If you have ever tried to return more than one element, you know that you’ll will be greeted with this error: Syntax error: Adjacent JSX elements must be wrapped in an enclosing tag. The way out of that is to make use of a wrapper div or span element that acts as the enclosing tag. So instead of…

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How User Personas Can Improve Your SEO Performance by @joshuacmccoy

Here’s why and how to create user personas that can help improve SEO performance.The post How User Personas Can Improve Your SEO Performance by @joshuacmccoy appeared first on Search Engine Journal. Source: https://www.searchenginejournal.com/feed/

Prototyping in the Browser

Prototyping animations and interactions is vital for a number of reasons: they can make your interface feel deceptively fast, they can help focus the user on a specific task, and they can provide a better sense of the current state of your application. Is data being loaded? Is something now unclickable? How long do they have to wait until they can perform an action? At Gusto, I’ve been working on a lot of tiny interaction details and prototypes lately for these very reasons — sadly there’s not much that I can show you all in detail just yet. But, I think the process of how I’m doing this is far more interesting than what I’m actually working on so that’s what I’m going to share here. The problem I’ve faced with prototyping animations comes down to the tools because they ultimately feel restrictive to me. Whenever I’ve experimented with them…

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Don’t just copy the @font-face out of Google Fonts URLs

I don’t think this is an epidemic or anything, but I’ve seen it done a few times and even advocated for. This is what I mean… You go to Google Fonts and pick a font like Open Sans, and it gives you either a <link> or an @import with a URL there in which to ready this font for usage on your site. You can take a peek in there and see what it returns… It’s just some @font-face declarations, of course! Now your performance-minded brain kicks off. Wait. So, I make one HTTP request for this stylesheet, and then it makes more HTTP requests for those woff2 files it’s linking up. Screw the middle man here, why not just copy those @font-face blocks right out of here and use them. You can! But! The issue is that Google does fancy Google things here and the contents of that original…

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The Four Big Ways Jetpack Helps with Image Performance

We’ve been working with Jetpack around here as a sponsor. It’s a great match because as someone with a bunch of self-hosted WordPress sites, Jetpack is one of those no-brainer plugins for me. Jetpack can do a ton of good things for any site in a variety of very different ways. Here’s one way to think about it: it brings the power of WordPress’ own massive servers to you. For now, let’s just focus on one angle of what Jetpack can do for you: image performance. Jetpack does a ton for you in this regard, solving some non-trivial performance upgrades. Let’s take a look at what I see as the four big boosts you get from Jetpack on your images. 1) WordPress does responsive images for you OK, I cheated with the first one because you don’t actually need Jetpack to benefit from this. But it’s an important and foundational…

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Here’s the thing about “unused CSS” tools

There are a lot of tools that aim to help you remove “unused CSS” from your project. Never a week goes by that I don’t see a tool for this being shared or promoted. It must strike some kind of perfect chord for some developers. I care about performance, and I know that reducing file sizes is good for performance. Indeed, it is. I bet we have CSS that is unused in our stylesheets, if we removed that, that’s a performance win. Yep, it would be. We should automate that. Ehhhhhh, I’m not so sure. There are major performance tooling players that play up this idea, like Lighthouse and how it gives you CSS and JS “Coverage”, which will surely tell you that you’re shipping code you don’t need to be. The tools that claim to help you with unused CSS have to perform analysis to be able to tell…

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Your Brain on Front-End Development

Part of the job of being a front-end developer is applying different techniques and technologies to pull of the desired UI and UX. Perhaps you work with a design team and implement their designs. I know when I look at a design (heck, even if I know I’m not going to be building it), my front-end brain starts triggering all sorts of things I know will be related to the task. Let’s take a look at what I mean. Check out this lovely Dribbble shot for a Food Recipe Website from Riko Sapto Dimo. It’s a very appealing design, and there is loads in there to think about from a front-end web design and development standpoint. We’re going to mostly be talking about design pattern choices and HTML/CSS tech choices. There is much more to the job of front-end development. Accessibility! Performance! Semantics! Design systems! All important stuff as well.…

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