Category Archive for: Mac

rfp-robotRFP ROBOT: Website Request for Proposal Generator

The time has come for a new website (or website redesign), which means you need to write a website request for proposal or web RFP. A Google search produces a few examples, but they vary wildly and don’t seem to speak really to your goals for developing or redesigning a new website. You need to write a website RFP that will clearly articulate your needs and generate responses from the best website designers and developers out there. But how?

Have no fear, RFP Robot is here. He will walk you through a step-by-step process to help you work through the details of your project and create a PDF formatted website design RFP that will provide the information vendors need to write an accurate bid. RFP Robot will tell you what info you should include, point out pitfalls, and give examples.


New in Basecamp 3: To-do Groups

A little thing that’s a big deal.For years, we’ve been making to-do lists in Basecamp that looked like this:See those === DIVIDERS ===? We were trying to group related to-dos together within a list. All we wanted was to bring a little structure, and an extra ounce of organization, to a single flat list.We weren’t alone. Whenever a customer showed us how they use Basecamp, we’d inevitably run into a similar === DIVIDER === pattern. They were trying to do what we were trying to do.We were all hacking it. As of today, the silliness is over. No hacks required!We just launched To-do Groups in Basecamp 3!What’s a group?A group is like a sublist on a list. It’s organization, it’s structure, it’s an envelope, it’s a box. It has a header, and to-dos grouped below.The anatomy of a Basecamp 3 to-do list with two groupsWhen you drag a group header, all the to-dos under that header move with…

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Manage and Protect Your Apple Devices

(This is a sponsored post.)Jamf Now is a mobile device management solution for the iPad, iPhone, and Mac devices at work. We make management tasks like deploying Wi-Fi passwords, setting up email accounts, securing company data, and enforcing passcodes, simple and affordable, so businesses can support their users. No IT required. CSS-Tricks readers can manage their first 3 devices for free, forever! Sign up today to create your free account! Direct Link to Article — Permalink Manage and Protect Your Apple Devices is a post from CSS-Tricks Source: CssTricks

Getting Around a Revoked Certificate in OSX

Let me start this off by saying this is not an ideal trick and one I hope no one else needs to use because it’s a bad idea to work around a browser feature that’s aimed to protect your security. That said, I am in the process of testing a product and ran into a weird situation where our team had to revoke the SSL certificate we had assigned to our server. We’re going to replace it but I have testing to do in the meantime and need access to our staging server, so waiting is kind of a blocker because, well, this message gets me nowhere. Safari’s warning for a site with a revoked certificate. This message is different from the warnings browsers provide for sites without SSL. Those give you a built-in workaround by simply dismissing the warning. The difference is that a revoked certificate implies that the…

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A Look Back at the History of CSS

When you think of HTML and CSS, you probably imagine them as a package deal. But for years after Tim Berners-Lee first created the World Wide Web in 1989, there was no such thing as CSS. The original plan for the web offered no way to style a website at all. There’s a now-infamous post buried in the archives of the WWW mailing list. It was written by Marc Andreessen in 1994, who would go on to co-create both the Mosaic and Netscape browsers. In the post, Andreessen remarked that because there was no way to style a website with HTML, the only thing he could tell web developers when asked about visual design was, “sorry you’re screwed.” 10 years later, CSS was on its way to full adoption by a newly enthused web community. *W**hat happened along the way?* Finding a Styling Language There were plenty of ideas for…

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Google Becomes Apple’s Search Provider on iOS and Mac by @MattGSouthern

Google is now Apple’s default search provider for Siri, iOS search, and Spotlight search on macOS.The post Google Becomes Apple’s Search Provider on iOS and Mac by @MattGSouthern appeared first on Search Engine Journal. Source: https://www.searchenginejournal.com/feed/

An Introduction to Node.js

Decoupled applications are increasing in popularity as brand experiences continue to move beyond the traditional website. Although your content management system (CMS) might house your content alongside Drupal, it doesn’t just stay put. APIs are making calls to extend that content to things like digital signage, kiosks, mobile … really, the sky’s the limit (as long as there’s an API). Decoupled applications are nothing new; Acquia CTO and Founder Dries Buytaert has been writing about this for at least two years. And we’ve been working with clients, such as Princess Cruises and Powdr, to build decoupled experiences and applications for their customers. Why is decoupled Drupal becoming so popular? We see a number of benefits both from our customers’ perspective as well as from our partners. The primary use case for decoupled relates to when our customers need a single source of truth for content that supports multiple applications. Drupal’s…

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Movavi Screen Capture Studio Review: Recording Online Videos is a Breeze

Inspired Magazine Inspired Magazine – creativity & inspiration daily You wake up for work. The first item on your to-do list is to open up that social media webinar you’ve been looking forward to. You’re fifteen minutes early and ready to learn about how you can turn your small business into a presence on Facebook. But then, the phone rings. Your kid got sick at school and now you need to come and pick him up. Wouldn’t it be nice to have a quick way to record that webinar for future viewing? Quite a few versions of screen capture software exist. Some cost hundreds, or even thousands, of dollars. Others come as browser extensions or default software installed into your operating system. These tend to work for limited use, but you often run into problems like the amount of time you can capture, resolution difficulties and watered-down features in general. The…

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Cross Browser Testing with CrossBrowserTesting

(This is a sponsored post.)Say you do your development work on a Mac, but you’d like to test out some designs in Microsoft Edge, which doesn’t have macOS version. Or vice versa! You work on a PC and you need to test on Safari, which no longer makes a Windows version. It’s a classic problem, and one I’ve been dealing with for a decade. I remember buying a copy of Windows Vista, buying software to manage virtual machines, and spending days just getting a testing environment set up. You can still go down that road, if you, ya know, love pain. Or you can use CrossBrowserTesting and have a super robust testing environment for a huge variety of browsers/platforms/versions without ever leaving the comfort of your favorite browser. It’s ridiculously wonderful. Getting started, the most basic thing you can do is pick a browser/platform, specify a URL, and fire it…

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A Personal Journey to Fix a Grunt File Permissions issue

I was working on a personal project this past week and got a weird error when I tried to compile my Sass files. Unfortunately, I did not screenshot the exact error, but was something along the lines of this: Failed to write to location cssmin: style.css EACCES That EACCES code threw me for a loop but I was able to deduce that it was a file permissions issue, based on the error description saying it was unable to write the file and from some quick StackOverflow searching. I couldn’t find a lot of answers for how to fix this, so I made an attempt to fix it myself. Many of the forum threads I found suggested it could a permissions issue with Node, so I went through the painful exercise of reinstalling it and only made things worse because then Terminal could not even find the npm or grunt tasks.…

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Lots of new Basecamp 3 stuff

We’ve been plugging away this summer on a wide variety of improvements on Basecamp 3. While there have been a ton of improvements on the iOS and Android side as well, this post will focus on some of the larger improvements to the web/desktop version.Focus ModeNeed to do some deep work? Go into Focus Mode. This will turn off all notifications, and hide all unread badges.To enter Focus Mode, click your avatar top right, and click the “Turn on Focus Mode” button.Color and highlight your textLots of requests for this one. Now you can color and highlight your text in messages, automatic check-in answers, comments, to-dos, etc. Basically anywhere you can turn text bold, italic, etc, you can now also color it up.Just click the dropper icon in the toolbar to add some color.Quick jump to projects, teams, recently visited pages, and peopleBig one. No matter where you are, hit COMMAND-J (Mac) or CONTROL-J (windows) and…

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Improving your visual design skills: Thoughts for beginners

Last summer, I set out to improve the visual polish of my client deliverables. Other UX team members’ work looked like it could have been from members of the visual design team, and it was time to up my game. I felt lost, however, in plotting concrete steps to accomplish this goal. While I knew what I need to do — build an understanding of typography and color, and strengthen existing skills around layout and visual hierarchy — I didn’t know what resources to trust, tools to use, or ways to practice. Fast forward a year, and my visual skills — while still budding — have grown. If you’d like to create more visually effective deliverables and improve your basic visual design skills, below are resources and tools to get you started, and some lessons that will help you succeed along the way. Books & Articles Here are a few…

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More Gotchas Getting Inline SVG Into Production—Part II

The following is a guest post by Rob Levin and Chris Rumble. Rob and Chris both work on the product design team at Mavenlink. Rob is also creator and host of the SVG Immersion Podcast and wrote the original 5 Gotchas article back in ’14. Chris, is a UI and Motion Designer/Developer based out of San Francisco. In this article, they go over some additional issues they encountered after incorporating inline SVGs in to Mavenlink’s flagship application more then 2 years ago. The article illustrations were done by Rob and—in the spirit of our topic—are 100% vector SVGs! Wow, it’s been over 2 years since we posted the 5 Gotchas Getting SVG Into Production article. Well, we’ve encountered some new gotchas making it time for another follow up post! We’ll label these 6-10 paying homage to the first 5 gotchas in the original post 🙂 Gotcha Six: IE Drag &…

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Someone Who Finishes

This is neat little tidbit of news (although it feels “big” for me, personally): Both MNML App and Desk App are featured in the Apps for Writers category in the Mac App Store. And, as far as I know, I believe I’m the only one to have two apps simultaneously featured in a perennial category like this: Apps for Writers! I haven’t done any serious research about that possible fact so I’m probably wayyyyyy off, but regardless I am very grateful and humbled that they would put both of my indie projects in an area that has some very nice visibility. But I want to talk about something else. I want to talk about a creative dilemma. I want to talk about starting and finishing. You see, both MNML and Desk were and have been serious labors of love, as they say. My brother asked me the other day what I thought the total amount…

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What’s new in Basecamp for iOS

Basecamp 3.5.1 is now available in the App Store. If you’re already a pro with Basecamp on your iPhone and iPad, you’re going to love this release. If you haven’t tried it yet, now is a great time to start taking advantage of these new time-saving features. While you’re installing the latest update, read this quick look at what’s new…Swipe for your next unreadWhen you’ve got a bunch of unreads on Hey! and you’re cranking through them, it can feel like a chore to tap an unread, read it, then go back and tap the next one. Now you can simply tap an unread and when you’re done reading it, swipe-left to go to the next one! Repeat until you’re done. Here’s how it looks:1. Tap an unread, 2. Tap OK, 3. Swipe-left to load the next one!Search inside BasecampYou probably already know you can swipe-down or swipe-left from the Home screen on your iOS…

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A Year’s Work

Much of my life can be measured by domain registration dates and renewals. If that hits too close to home… well… then you know what I’m talking about. So much of my life has been on the internet… building things and creating and viewing and consuming and it’s been the former that’s been a huge part of how I give and extract value. It’s how I’ve financed a growing family and the many adventures that I’ve had professionally through many, many geographical moves. It’s how I’ve gotten a lot of pleasure in and out of life and I think I’m only getting started. And I’m reminded of all of this when I get emails in my inbox about the domains and registrations that I’ve made along the way, some of which I continue to keep and some I let go of. Domain Renewal A year or so I decided to put together MNML…

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5 Awesome Sublime Plugins you Won’t Find in Top Plugin Posts

I am a huge fan of Sublime text editor and whenever I go and try other text editors I come back to Sublime crying: “Forgive me I’ll never, ever, leave you again!” But I’m not here to praise Sublime. In this post I’m rather going to share some of the Sublime plugins I’ve been using a lot and which are really helpful and fun to work with. You may find them for your favorite text editor as well. Let’s dive into the first one. 1) Text Pastry How many times have you had a markup and all you wanted to do was to add incremental numbers to it? For example if you have a list with a heavy content, of course you can’t use Emmet or similar tools to add those incremental numbers because the markup is already there, unless you use some tricks. However there is a faster way…

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Poll Results: Local WordPress Development

We kicked a poll off three months ago asking y’all what kind of local development environment you set up for running WordPress locally. At the time of this writing, we got 2,623 votes, so a decent amount of significance here. Especially because the question was phrased: If you’re running WordPress locally (i.e running PHP, MySQL, and a web server), how are you doing it? Presupposes that you are running a local environment. (Please do that.) Here’s an image of the results: (If you can’t see that, don’t worry, we’re about to go through the results.) The winner, at 61%, was using some kind of software-with-a-UI to manage it. WAMP / MAMP / AMPPS were mentioned, but it also said “Similar software with UI”, which I think is relevant as we’ll see in a second. This option was more than 3 times more popular than any other choice. Vagrant was in…

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