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Category Archive for: jquery

rfp-robotRFP ROBOT: Website Request for Proposal Generator

The time has come for a new website (or website redesign), which means you need to write a website request for proposal or web RFP. A Google search produces a few examples, but they vary wildly and don’t seem to speak really to your goals for developing or redesigning a new website. You need to write a website RFP that will clearly articulate your needs and generate responses from the best website designers and developers out there. But how?

Have no fear, RFP Robot is here. He will walk you through a step-by-step process to help you work through the details of your project and create a PDF formatted website design RFP that will provide the information vendors need to write an accurate bid. RFP Robot will tell you what info you should include, point out pitfalls, and give examples.


Fitting Text to a Container

There are a number of ways to go about putting some text in a container and having it size itself to fill that container. There are different technologies we can use and different considerations to think about. Let us count the ways. Magic Number it with viewport units If you set type with vw (viewport width) units, you can find an exact number where the text pretty closely fits the container and doesn’t break as you resize. I’d call this a magic number. In this case, font-size: 25.5vw; works down to a 320px viewport, but still will break much lower than that. See the Pen Fitted Text with Viewport Units by Chris Coyier (@chriscoyier) on CodePen. This is kind of a less exotic version of fluid typography, which involves more of a sprinkling of viewport units and min/max sizes. FitText Dave Rupert’s FitText is up for the job. You still…

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A Quick Roundup of Recent React Chatter

Like many, many others, I’m in the pool of leveling up my JavaScript skills and learning how to put React to use. That’s why Brad Frost resonated with me when he posted My Struggle to Learn React.” As Brad does, he clearly outlines his struggles point-by-point: I have invested enough time learning it React and ES6 travel together Syntax and conventions Getting lost in this-land I haven’t found sample projects or tutorials that match how i tend to work I’m less competent at JS than HTML and CSS It seems that Brad’s struggles resonated with others as well, inspiring empathy and help from the community. For example, Kevin Ball touches on the second and third frustrations by supplying a distinction between React and ES6 and examples of the syntax and conventions of each: For each feature, I show a couple examples of what it might look like, identify where it…

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The web can be anything we want it to be

I really enjoyed this chat between Bruce Lawson and Mustafa Kurtuldu where they talked about browser support and the health of the web. Bruce expands upon a lot of the thoughts in a post he wrote last year called World Wide Web, Not Wealthy Western Web where he writes: …across the world, regardless of disposable income, regardless of hardware or network speed, people want to consume the same kinds of goods and services. And if your websites are made for the whole world, not just the wealthy Western world, then the next 4 billion people might consume the stuff that your organization makes. Another highlight is where Bruce also mentions that, as web developers, we might think that we’ve all moved on from jQuery as a community, and yet there are still millions of websites that depend upon jQuery to function properly. It’s an interesting anecdote and relevant to recent…

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When should we release Drupal 9?

Since the release of Drupal 8.0.0 in November 2015, the Drupal 8 core committers have been discussing when and how we’ll release Drupal 9. Nat Catchpole, one of Drupal 8’s core committers, shared some excellent thoughts about what goes into making that decision. The driving factor in that discussion is security support for Drupal 8’s third party dependencies (e.g. Symfony, Twig, Guzzle, jQuery, etc). Our top priority is to ensure that all Drupal users are using supported versions of these components so that all Drupal sites remain secure. In his blog, Nat uses Symfony as an example. The Symfony project announced that it will stop supporting Symfony 3 in November 2021, which means that Symfony 3 won’t receive security updates after that date. Consequently, by November 2021, we need to prepare all Drupal sites to use Symfony 4 or later. Nothing has been decided yet, but the current thinking is…

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Learning Gutenberg: Series Introduction

Hey CSS-Tricksters! 👋 We have a special long-form series we’re kicking off here totally dedicated to Gutenberg, a major change to the WordPress editor. I’ve invited a dynamic duo of authors to bring you this series, which will bring you up to speed on what Gutenberg is, what it can do for your site, and how you can actually develop for it. Who this is for This series is more for developers who are curious about this new world and wanna get started working with it. This series isn’t necessarily for site owners who want to know how it’s going to affect their site or who are worried about it for any reason. It’s clear there is a lot of possibility with Gutenberg. Yes, it’s aiming to be a better editing experience, but it also likely to change how people think of what’s possible with WordPress. With the custom “blocks”…

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The State of Web Animation: Part 2

In Part 2, we’re picking up where I left off with current tools for animation with JavaScript (mostly in the form of JavaScript libraries). Be sure to check out Part One. Javascript is admittedly a more controversial method of animation than the methods I mentioned previously (Video, Gifs, CSS Transitions + Keyframes). There was once a day when we longed for CSS support of animation and, when that day came to pass, many disregarded JavaScript animation as non-performant and outdated. But now, JavaScript animation is making a come-back in a few different forms (and no, none of them are just changing CSS classes). There are far too many libraries out there to cover them all, so I’ll try to cover more broad techniques with some notable libraries: jQuery Using jQuery as an animation tool (with .animate()) is pretty outdated. Unless you really need your animations to work in IE versions 9 or…

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The State of Web Animation: Part 1

We’re now well into 2018 and I’m thinking it’s time for a check-in. A lot has happened in the world of the web in the last few years, so let’s review a bit: Responsive Design is now the norm. Clients know what User Experience Design is now and not only respect it but expect it on their projects. Concerns for Web Accessibility are growing. Internet Explorer is all but dead and browsers are in a state of constant improvement without being locked into one version or the other. Overall, I’d say things have really taken an amazing turn for the better (for developers anyway). Now that we’ve begun to cover the basics of the availability and understandability of our content and tools, what’s next? I like to think the next era can focus not on technology, but on how we can make the web feel more like our natural world. And don’t worry, I’m…

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How to use Drupal 8's off-canvas dialog in your modules

The goal of this tutorial is to show how to use Drupal 8.5’s new off-canvas dialog in your own Drupal modules. The term “off-canvas” refers to the ability for a dialog to slide in from the side of the page, in addition to resizing the page so that no part of it is obstructed by the dialog. You can see the off-canvas dialog in action in this animated GIF: This new Drupal 8.5 feature allows us to improve the content authoring and site building experience by turning Drupal outside-in. We can use the off-canvas dialog to enable the content creator or site builder to seamlessly edit content or configuration in-place, and see any changes take effect immediately. There is no need to navigate to the administrative backend to make edits. As you’ll see in this tutorial, it’s easy to use the off-canvas dialog in your own Drupal modules. I use…

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SANDcamp: Introduction to Site Building

Start:  2018-03-23 09:00 – 17:00 America/Los_Angeles Organizers:  rainbreaw cstauffer Event type:  Training (free or commercial) https://www.sandcamp.org/introduction-drupal-8-site-building Description Learn the basics of building a CMS (content management system) based website using Drupal 8 — a completely customizable, flexible, and scalable open-source framework. This introduction will give you all of the essentials required to produce a straightforward site, customize your content and displays, and enough knowledge to find more targeted information for unique customizations as you progress through your Drupal site building adventures. This training is being offered by STAUFFER – www.stauffer.com – for free as part of the Drupal Global Training Days initiative. Training Agenda Morning: Part I Introduction: What is Drupal? Getting Set Up Quickly Basic Site Configuration Basic Content Creation Navigation / Structure: — The Menu System — Taxonomy Morning: Part II Going beyond OOTB (out of the box) Options — Changing functionality with Contributed Modules — Customizing your…

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The JavaScript Learning Landscape in 2018

Raise your hand if this sounds like you: You’ve been in the tech industry for a number of years, you know HTML and CSS inside-and-out, and you make a good living. But, you have a little voice in the back of your head that keeps whispering, “It’s time for something new, for the next step in your career. You need to learn programming.” Yep, same here. I’ve served in a variety of roles in the tech industry for close to a decade. I’ve written a bunch of articles on design, coding, HTML, and CSS. Hell, I’ve even written a few books and spoken at conferences around the world. But there’s still that voice that keeps telling me I need to tackle programming; that I’ll never be fulfilled until I learn how to develop my own ideas and projects from scratch. Being a web guy, the obvious language to learn: JavaScript.…

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Direction Aware Hover Effects

This is a particular design trick that never fails to catch people’s eye! I don’t know the exact history of who-thought-of-what first and all that, but I know I have seen a number of implementations of it over the years. I figured I’d round a few of them up here. Noel Delagado See the Pen Direction-aware 3D hover effect (Concept) by Noel Delgado (@noeldelgado) on CodePen. The detection here is done by tracking the mouse position on mouseover and mouseout and calculating which side was crossed. It’s a small amount of clever JavaScript, the meat of which is figuring out that direction: var getDirection = function (ev, obj) { var w = obj.offsetWidth, h = obj.offsetHeight, x = (ev.pageX – obj.offsetLeft – (w / 2) * (w > h ? (h / w) : 1)), y = (ev.pageY – obj.offsetTop – (h / 2) * (h > w ? (w…

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Stimulus 1.0: A modest JavaScript framework for the HTML you already have

Modern JavaScript doesn’t have to mean single-page, client-side MVC apps.We write a lot of JavaScript at Basecamp, but we don’t use it to create “JavaScript applications” in the contemporary sense. All our applications have server-side rendered HTML at their core, then add sprinkles of JavaScript to make them sparkle.This is the way of the majestic monolith. Basecamp runs across half a dozen platforms, including native mobile apps, with a single set of controllers, views, and models created using Ruby on Rails. Having a single, shared interface that can be updated in a single place is key to being able to perform with a small team, despite the many platforms.It allows us to party with productivity like days of yore. A throwback to when a single programmer could make rapacious progress without getting stuck in layers of indirection or distributed systems. A time before everyone thought the holy grail was to confine their…

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Is jQuery still relevant?

Remy Sharp: I’ve been playing with BigQuery and querying HTTP Archive’s dataset … I’ve queried the HTTP Archive and included the top 20 [JavaScript libraries] … jQuery accounts for a massive 83% of libraries found on the web sites. This corroborates other research, like W3Techs: jQuery is used by 96.2% of all the websites whose JavaScript library we know. This is 73.1% of all websites. And BuiltWith that shows it at 88.5% of the top 1,000,000 sites they look at. Even without considering what jQuery does, the amount of people that already know it, and the heaps of resources out there around it, yes, jQuery is still relevant. People haven’t stopped teaching it either. Literally in schools, but also courses like David DeSandro’s Fizzy School. Not to mention we have our own. While the casual naysayers and average JavaScript trolls are obnoxious for dismissing it out of hand, I can…

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10 Web Design Choices That Can Kill Your Clients’ Search Ranking

As a web designer, there’s no getting away from your responsibility to make design choices with SEO in mind. Your clients want their sites to rank well in search engines – there’s not much point in having one otherwise – and this means we sometimes have to make compromises. Compromise really is the key term, too. There’s no perfect way to design a website for search and your all your other priorities (user experience, conversions, etc.). You have to make the call on a number of design choices and come to the best overall result you can. Here are 10 design choices to avoid for the sake of your clients’ search ranking. Indexability killers The first thing to think about with search optimisation indexability and there are a number of potential issues you can come across as a designer. #1: One page, too much content Even basic apps like IFTTT and Pocket break…

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10 Web Design Choices That Can Kill Your Clients’ Search Ranking

As a web designer, there’s no getting away from your responsibility to make design choices with SEO in mind. Your clients want their sites to rank well in search engines – there’s not much point in having one otherwise – and this means we sometimes have to make compromises. Compromise really is the key term, too. There’s no perfect way to design a website for search and your all your other priorities (user experience, conversions, etc.). You have to make the call on a number of design choices and come to the best overall result you can. Here are 10 design choices to avoid for the sake of your clients’ search ranking. Indexability killers The first thing to think about with search optimisation indexability and there are a number of potential issues you can come across as a designer. #1: One page, too much content Even basic apps like IFTTT and Pocket break…

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Dropdown Menus in Drupal 8 with the Superfish Module

If you want to build a large, multi-level drop-down menu in Drupal 8, then the Superfish module is a great choice. The Superfish module makes use of the jQuery Superfish menu plugin, which is useful for multi-level drop-down menus. Superfish has more features than most dropdown menus. It supports touch devices and keyboard interaction. [[ This is a content summary only. Visit http://OSTraining.com for full links, other content, and more! ]] Source: https://www.ostraining.com/

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