Category Archive for: html

rfp-robotRFP ROBOT: Website Request for Proposal Generator

The time has come for a new website (or website redesign), which means you need to write a website request for proposal or web RFP. A Google search produces a few examples, but they vary wildly and don’t seem to speak really to your goals for developing or redesigning a new website. You need to write a website RFP that will clearly articulate your needs and generate responses from the best website designers and developers out there. But how?

Have no fear, RFP Robot is here. He will walk you through a step-by-step process to help you work through the details of your project and create a PDF formatted website design RFP that will provide the information vendors need to write an accurate bid. RFP Robot will tell you what info you should include, point out pitfalls, and give examples.


CSS Basics: Styling Links Like a Boss

The web was founded on links. The idea that we can click/tap a link and navigate from one web page to another is how surfin’ the web become a household phrase. Links in HTML even look different from regular text without any CSS styling at all. See the Pen Default Link by CSS-Tricks (@css-tricks) on CodePen. They are blue (purple if visited). They are underlined. That’s a link in it’s purest form. But what if we want to change things up a bit? Perhaps blue doesn’t work with your website’s design. Maybe you have an aversion to underlines. Whatever the reason, CSS lets us style links just we can any other element. All we need to do is target the <a> element in our stylesheet. Want to use a different font, change the color, remove the underline and make it all uppercase? Sure, why not? a { color: red; text-decoration:…

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CSS Basics: The Second “S” in CSS

CSS is an abbreviation for Cascading Style Sheets. While most of the discussion about CSS on the web (or even here on CSS-Tricks) is centered around writing styles and how the cascade affects them, what we don’t talk a whole lot about is the sheet part of the language. So let’s give that lonely second “S” a little bit of the spotlight and understand what we mean when we say CSS is a style sheet. The Sheet Contains the Styles The cascade describes how styles interact with one another. The styles make up the actual code. Then there’s the sheet that contains that code. Like a sheet of paper that we write on, the “sheet” of CSS is the digital file where styles are coded. If we were to illustrate this, the relationship between the three sort of forms a cascade: The sheet holds the styles. There can be multiple…

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Stimulus

A modest JavaScript framework for the HTML you already have. This will appeal to anyone who is apprehensive about JavaScript being required to generate HTML, yet wants a modern framework to help with modern problems, like state management. I wonder if this would be a good answer for things like WordPress or CraftCMS themes that are designed to be server side but, like any site, could benefit from client-side JavaScript enhancements. Stimulus isn’t really built to handle SPAs, but instead pair with Turbolinks. That way, you’re still changing out page content with JavaScript, but all the routing and HTML generation is server side. Kinda old school meets new school. Direct Link to Article — Permalink Stimulus is a post from CSS-Tricks Source: CssTricks

Article Performance Leaderboard

A clever idea from Michael Donohoe: pit websites against each other in a performance battle! Donohoe is a long-time newsroom guy, so this is specifically about article pages for major publications. Lets state the obvious, this is an imperfect and evolving measure and the goal is to foster discussion and rivalry in making our pages better, faster, and lighter. Bear in mind this was built as an internal tool at Hearst Newspapers to track changes as we rollout our new Article template on mobile for SFGate and eventually all sites (SF Chronicle, Houston Chronicle, Times Union, etc). Developers, designers, and product need to talk more on how to achieve this. A 1,700 word article might weigh 10KB but by the time you load HTML, JS, CSS, images, 3rd-parties, and ads, it can range between 2MB to 8MB depending on the web site. Bear in mind, the first Harry Potter ebook…

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A Short History of WaSP and Why Web Standards Matter

In August of 2013, Aaron Gustafson posted to the WaSP blog. He had a bittersweet message for a community that he had helped lead: Thanks to the hard work of countless WaSP members and supporters (like you), Tim Berners-Lee’s vision of the web as an open, accessible, and universal community is largely the reality. While there is still work to be done, the sting of the WaSP is no longer necessary. And so it is time for us to close down The Web Standards Project. If there’s just the slightest hint of wistful regret in Gustafson’s message, it’s because the Web Standards Project changed everything that had become the norm on the web during its 15+ years of service. Through dedication and developer advocacy, they hoisted the web up from a nest of browser incompatibility and meaningless markup to the standardized and feature-rich application platform most of us know today.…

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Counting With CSS Counters and CSS Grid

You’ve heard of CSS Grid, I’m sure of that. It would be hard to miss it considering that the whole front-end developer universe has been raving about it for the past year. Whether you’re new to Grid or have already spent some time with it, we should start this post with a short definition directly from the words of W3C: Grid Layout is a new layout model for CSS that has powerful abilities to control the sizing and positioning of boxes and their contents. Unlike Flexible Box Layout, which is single-axis–oriented, Grid Layout is optimized for 2-dimensional layouts: those in which alignment of content is desired in both dimensions. In my own words, CSS Grid is a mesh of invisible horizontal and vertical lines. We arrange elements in the spaces between those lines to create a desired layout. An easier, stable, and standardized way to structure contents in a web…

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Web-Powered Augmented Reality: a Hands-On Tutorial

Uri Shaked has written about his journey in AR on the web from the very early days of Google’s Project Tango to the recent A-Frame experiments from Mozilla. Front-end devs might be interested in A-Frame because of how you work with it – it’s a declarative language like HTML! I particularly like this section where Uri describes how it felt to first play around with AR: The ability to place virtual objects in the real space, and have them stick in place even when you move around, seemed to me like we were diving down the uncanny valley, where the boundaries between the physical world and the game were beginning to blur. This was the first time I experienced AR without the need for markers or special props — it just worked out of the box, everywhere. Direct Link to Article — Permalink Web-Powered Augmented Reality: a Hands-On Tutorial is a post…

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Sketching in the Browser

Mark Dalgleish details how his team at seek tried to build a library of React components that could then be translated into Sketch documents. Why is that important though? Well, Mark describes the problems that his team faced like this: …most design systems still have a fundamental flaw. Designers and developers continue to work in entirely different mediums. As a result, without constant, manual effort to keep them in sync, our code and design assets are constantly drifting further and further apart. For companies working with design systems, it seems our industry is stuck with design tools that are essentially built for the wrong medium—completely unable to feed our development work back into the next round of design. Mark then describes how his team went ahead and open-sourced html-sketchapp-cli, a command line tool for converting HTML documents into Sketch components. The idea is that this will ultimately save everyone from…

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Building a Good Download… Button?

The semantics inherent in HTML elements tell us what we’re supposed to use them for. Need a heading? You’ll want a heading element. Want a paragraph? Our trusty friend <p> is here, loyal as ever. Want a download? Well, you’re going to want… hmm. What best describes a download? Is it a triggered action, and therefore should be in the domain of the <button> element? Or is it a destination, and therefore best described using an <a> element? Buttons Do Things, Links Go Places There seems to be a lot of confusion over when to use buttons and when to use links. Much like tabs versus spaces or pullover hoodies versus zip-ups, this debate might rage without end. However, the W3C provides us with an important clue as to who is right: the download attribute. The What Now? The internet as we know it couldn’t exist without links. They form…

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Set Up AWS CLI and Download Your S3 Files From the Command Line

The other day I needed to download the contents of a large S3 folder. That is a tedious task in the browser: log into the AWS console, find the right bucket, find the right folder, open the first file, click download, maybe click download a few more times until something happens, go back, open the next file, over and over. Happily, Amazon provides <span <the=”” other=”” day=”” i=”” needed=”” to=”” download=”” the=”” contents=”” of=”” a=”” large=”” s3=”” folder.=”” that=”” is=”” tedious=”” task=”” in=”” browser:=”” log=”” into=”” aws=”” console,=”” find=”” right=”” bucket,=”” folder,=”” open=”” first=”” file,=”” click=”” download,=”” maybe=”” few=”” more=”” times=”” until=”” something=”” happens,=”” go=”” back,=”” next=”” over=”” and=”” over.=”” happily,=”” amazon=”” provides=”” AWS CLI, a command line tool for interacting with AWS. With AWS CLI, that entire process took less than three seconds: $ aws s3 sync s3://<bucket>/<path> </local/path> Getting set up with AWS CLI is simple, but the documentation…

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Stimulus 1.0: A modest JavaScript framework for the HTML you already have

Modern JavaScript doesn’t have to mean single-page, client-side MVC apps.We write a lot of JavaScript at Basecamp, but we don’t use it to create “JavaScript applications” in the contemporary sense. All our applications have server-side rendered HTML at their core, then add sprinkles of JavaScript to make them sparkle.This is the way of the majestic monolith. Basecamp runs across half a dozen platforms, including native mobile apps, with a single set of controllers, views, and models created using Ruby on Rails. Having a single, shared interface that can be updated in a single place is key to being able to perform with a small team, despite the many platforms.It allows us to party with productivity like days of yore. A throwback to when a single programmer could make rapacious progress without getting stuck in layers of indirection or distributed systems. A time before everyone thought the holy grail was to confine their…

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Boilerform: A Follow-Up

When Chris wrote his idea for a Boilerform, I had already been thinking about starting a new project. I’d just decided to put my front-end boilerplate to bed, and wanted something new to think about. Chris’ idea struck a chord with me immediately, so I got enthusiastically involved in the comments like an excitable puppy. That excitement led me to go ahead and build out the initial version of Boilerform, which you can check out here. The reason for my initial excitement was that I have a guilty pleasure for forms. In various jobs, I’ve worked with forms at a pretty intense level and have learned a lot about them. This has ranged from building dynamic form builders to high-level spam protection for a Harley-Davidson® website platform. Each different project has given me a look at the front-end and back-end of the process. Each of these projects has also picked…

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One File, Many Options: Using Variable Fonts on the Web

In 2016, an important development in web typography was jointly announced by representatives from Adobe, Microsoft, Apple, and Google. Version 1.8 of the OpenType font format introduced variable fonts. With so many big names involved, it’s unsurprising that all browsers are on-board and racing ahead with implementation. Font weights can be far more than just bold and normal—most professionally designed typefaces are available in variants ranging from a thin hairline ultralight to a black extra-heavy bold. To make use of all those weights, we would need a separate file for each. While a design is unlikely to need every font-weight, a wider variety than bold and normal adds visual hierarchy and interest to a page. The Google Fonts GUI makes clear: the more weights you choose, the slower your site There’s more than various weights to consider. CSS3 introduced the font-stretch property, with values from ultra-condensed to ultra-expanded. Until now,…

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How to Style a Form With Tailwind CSS

If you’ve been staying in the loop with the latest CSS frameworks, you’ve probably already heard of the newest kid on the block: Tailwind CSS. According to its documentation, “Tailwind is a utility-first CSS framework for rapidly building custom user interfaces.” In practice, this means using a variety of classes that closely map to underlying CSS properties. For example, applying a class like .text-center to an element means that we’re setting its text-align property to center. Simple enough, right? Using utility classes like this allows us to spend more time iterating through designs and avoiding premature abstraction of our CSS. Then, once we’re happy with our designs, Tailwind makes it easy to extract our utilities into component classes. Now, I’m sure you know that even mentioning a utility framework is an open invitation for a certain amount of brouhaha. Before we start yelling at me on Twitter or the comments…

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Get Ready for `display: contents;`

Last year I asked, “Will we be flattening our HTML for CSS Grids?” The issue is that the only way for elements to participate in the same CSS grid together (or flexbox for that matter) is for them to be siblings. So, in some cases we might be incentivized to forego HTML semantics for the benefit of layout (not great). One answer to this is display: contents;—a magical new display value that essentially makes the container disappear, making the child elements children of the element the next level up in the DOM. Fast forward to today, Chrome is shipping it, WebKit is shipping it, and Firefox has shipped it. Vote for it in Edge here. Wanna understand it better? Rachel Andrew wrote “Vanishing boxes with display contents” and clarifies how it all works: This value becomes useful if you want to add some element because it makes sense in terms…

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Meet the New Dialog Element

Keith Grant discusses how HTML 5.2 has introduced a peculiar new element: <dialog>. This is an absolutely positioned and horizontally centered modal that appears on top of other content on a page. Keith looks at how to style this new element, the basic opening/closing functionality in JavaScript and, of course, the polyfills that we’ll need to get cross-browser support right. Also, I had never heard of the ::backdrop pseudo element before. Thankfully the MDN documentation for this pseudo element digs into it a little bit more. Direct Link to Article — Permalink Meet the New Dialog Element is a post from CSS-Tricks Source: CssTricks

Simplifying the Apple Watch Breathe App Animation With CSS Variables

When I saw the original article on how to recreate this animation, my first thought was that it could all be simplified with the use of preprocessors and especialy CSS variables. So let’s dive into it and see how! The result we want to reproduce. The structure We keep the exact same structure. In order to avoid writing the same thing multiple times, I chose to use a preprocessor. My choice of preprocessor always depends on what I want to do, as, in a lot of cases, something like Pug offers more flexibility, but other times, Haml or Slim allow me to write the least amount of code, without even having to introduce a loop variable I wouldn’t be needing later anyway. Until recently, I would have probably used Haml in this case. However, I’m currently partial to another technique that lets me avoid setting the number of items both…

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Small Tweaks That Can Make a Huge Impact on Your Website’s Accessibility

For a beginner, accessibility can be daunting. With all of the best intentions in the world, the learning curve to developing compliant, fully accessible websites and apps is huge. It’s also hard to find the right advice, because it’s an ever-changing and increasingly crowded landscape. I’ve written this post to give you some tips on small things that can make a big difference, while hopefully not affecting your development process too much. Let’s dive in! Document Structure and Semantics It probably doesn’t come as much of a surprise that structuring your HTML in an organized, semantic way will make a big difference. Screen readers rely on a well-structured document in order to follow a coherent narrative, so make sure that you’re using the elements that the HTML5 spec provides responsively and effectively. If you’re unsure about how to markup your work correctly, check out resources such as HTML5 Doctor, Code…

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