Category Archive for: Flash

rfp-robotRFP ROBOT: Website Request for Proposal Generator

The time has come for a new website (or website redesign), which means you need to write a website request for proposal or web RFP. A Google search produces a few examples, but they vary wildly and don’t seem to speak really to your goals for developing or redesigning a new website. You need to write a website RFP that will clearly articulate your needs and generate responses from the best website designers and developers out there. But how?

Have no fear, RFP Robot is here. He will walk you through a step-by-step process to help you work through the details of your project and create a PDF formatted website design RFP that will provide the information vendors need to write an accurate bid. RFP Robot will tell you what info you should include, point out pitfalls, and give examples.


Working in quality time instead of clock time

One of the things I love about our flexible work environment at Basecamp is the freedom to step away from something whenever I need to.Right now I’m exploring designs for a new product idea. R&D work like this depends on having good mental and emotional energy. Sometimes you have it, sometimes you don’t.When you’re energetic and motivated, great things happen spontaneously, in unpredictable bursts of inspiration.But when you’re tired, distracted, or in the weeds on something, it’s usually better to stop working. Just admit (temporary) defeat and give yourself a chance to regroup. Do something else that’s less taxing, or call it quits and start again later.I always find this difficult to do, because the working world tells us that full-time employees should put in 8+ consecutive hours no matter what. So what if you’re frustrated, burned out, or not making much progress? Too bad, gotta punch the clock! Back to the grind!…

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Twenty Years as a Freelance Web Developer: Wisdom Gained and Lessons Learned

In the summer of 1998, when President Clinton fended off allegations of sexual impropriety and Donald Trump filmed a cameo in a Woody Allen movie, I embarked on my career as a freelance web developer. Twenty years and more than 300 websites later, I’m still at it—always working on my own and always from home. Over that time, I’ve had the pleasure of partnering with many prominent advertising agencies and boutique design firms as well as scores of local businesses and individuals. Those interested in making the switch to freelancing have often asked me for advice, and I’ve been happy to help with whatever words of wisdom I can provide. This article is a distillation of much of that. And it may prove helpful not only to developers and programmers who wish to freelance, but also designers, project managers, copywriters—anyone who desires to work independently from home in our industry.…

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Music, Made: NES and SNES

Amazing: I realized very early on that the music of a game could make it or break it. Quality gameplay included the musical score and the effects just as much as the storyline and everything else. In fact, the greatest video game songs of all time still ring in my head – they are that good. It’s amazing how memorable some of them really are. I believe this is less luck and much more skill (and science) and a major hat-tip goes to the composers. Unfortunately, this is one thing that’s missing in the modern web as we know it today. Back when Flash was king… you’d have background music on websites and blogs all the time. I had a repeating track that changed once a week on my Xanga Page back in the day… and I really liked it (although who knows if my readers liked it…). That was music,…

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The possibilities of the color-adjust property

The Open Web continues to show up in places we would have never originally expected to find it: our phones, televisions, watches, books, video game consoles, fast food menus, gas pumps, elevators, cars—even our refrigerators. By not making too many or too strict assumptions about how the web should be used, it remains flexible and adaptable. These qualities have allowed it to outperform closed technologies like Flash and Silverlight. With the web’s growth comes new features to better accommodate its new form factors and use cases. One feature I’m excited about is the color-adjust property, proposed in CSS Color Module Level 4. It is an acknowledgement that the web will continue to show up on devices that have less-than-stellar displays. There are two values for color-adjust: economy and exact. A value of exact tells the browser it shouldn’t make adjustments to the colors declared in the stylesheet: .card { background-color:…

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Five interesting ways to use Sanity.io for image art direction

When we saw Chris put up a list of cloud-hosted data-stores, we couldn’t resist letting him know that we also had one of those, only ours is a fully featured CMS that come with a rich query language and an open source, real time, collaborative authoring tool that you can tailor to your specific needs using React. It’s called Sanity.io. “Add us to your list!” we asked Chris. “No, your stuff is interesting, can’t you write about you,” he replied. “Maybe something that would be useful for people working with images.” Challenge accepted! Systems like Sanity wants to free your content from the specific page it happens to be sitting on, so that you can flow it through APIs. That way you can reuse your painstakingly crafted content anywhere you need it. So, what does this mean for images? Images are the odd ones out. We can capture documentation articles,…

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Anatomy of a malicious script: how a website can take over your browser

By now, we all know that the major tech behemoths like Facebook or Google know everything about our lives, including how often we go to the bathroom (hence all the prostate medication ads that keep popping up, even on reputable news sites). After all, we’ve given them permission to do so, by reading pages and pages of legalese in their T&C pages (we all did, didn’t we?) and clicking on the “Accept” button. But what can a site do to you, or to your device, without your explicit consent? What happens when you visit a slightly “improper” site, or a “proper” site you visited includes some third-party script that hasn’t been thoroughly checked? Has it ever happened to you that your browser gets hijacked and innumerable pop-ups come up, and you seem to be unable to close them without quitting the browser altogether, or clicking 25 times on the “Back”…

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Breathing New Life into an Old Website

Everyone working in development is bound at some time to discover they’ve been shelling out good money for hosting an old website that has been forgotten about. Rather than letting this investment go to waste, you could actually revive the old site by updating it. What you do with it after that is entirely up to you. You could sell it on to a new owner, monetize the content with advertising, use the site to promote a new product or service, or simply keep it as a portfolio example of your work. The longer the site has been sitting around, the more work you will need to do to getting working well. What follows are the basic things you’ll need to check and basic steps you can take to correct any problems you encounter. 1. Make sure you actually own the rights to the site This is not always as…

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Delivering WordPress in 7KB

Over the past six months, I’ve become increasingly interested in the topic of web sustainability. The carbon footprint of the Internet was not something I used to give much thought to, which is surprising considering my interest in environmental issues and the fact that my profession is web-based. The web in a warming world As a brief recap, I attended MozFest in London last year. In between sessions, I was scanning a noticeboard to see what was coming up, and I spotted a session entitled, “Building a Planet-Friendly Web.” I felt a little dumbstruck. What on Earth was this going to be about? I attended the session and the scales fell from my eyes. In what now seems obvious — but at the time was a revelation — I learned of the colossal energy demand of the Internet. This demand makes it the largest coal-fired machine on Earth, meaning that…

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The web can be anything we want it to be

I really enjoyed this chat between Bruce Lawson and Mustafa Kurtuldu where they talked about browser support and the health of the web. Bruce expands upon a lot of the thoughts in a post he wrote last year called World Wide Web, Not Wealthy Western Web where he writes: …across the world, regardless of disposable income, regardless of hardware or network speed, people want to consume the same kinds of goods and services. And if your websites are made for the whole world, not just the wealthy Western world, then the next 4 billion people might consume the stuff that your organization makes. Another highlight is where Bruce also mentions that, as web developers, we might think that we’ve all moved on from jQuery as a community, and yet there are still millions of websites that depend upon jQuery to function properly. It’s an interesting anecdote and relevant to recent…

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Hey hey `font-display`

Y’all know about font-display? It’s pretty great. It’s a CSS property that you can use within @font-face blocks to control how, visually, that font loads. Font loading is really pretty damn complicated. Here’s a guide from Zach Leatherman to prove it, which includes over 10 font loading strategies, including strategies that involve critical inline CSS of subsets of fonts combined with loading the rest of the fonts later through JavaScript. It ain’t no walk in the park. Using font-display is kinda like a walk in the park though. It’s just a single line of CSS. It doesn’t solve everything that Zach’s more exotic demos do, but it can go a long way with that one line. It’s notable to bring up right now, as support has improved a lot lately. It’s now in Firefox 58+, Chrome 60+, Safari 11.1+, iOS 11.3+, and Chrome on Android 64+. Pretty good. What do…

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The State of Web Animation: Part 2

In Part 2, we’re picking up where I left off with current tools for animation with JavaScript (mostly in the form of JavaScript libraries). Be sure to check out Part One. Javascript is admittedly a more controversial method of animation than the methods I mentioned previously (Video, Gifs, CSS Transitions + Keyframes). There was once a day when we longed for CSS support of animation and, when that day came to pass, many disregarded JavaScript animation as non-performant and outdated. But now, JavaScript animation is making a come-back in a few different forms (and no, none of them are just changing CSS classes). There are far too many libraries out there to cover them all, so I’ll try to cover more broad techniques with some notable libraries: jQuery Using jQuery as an animation tool (with .animate()) is pretty outdated. Unless you really need your animations to work in IE versions 9 or…

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Three Techniques for Performant Custom Font Usage

There’s a lot of good news in the world of web fonts! The forthcoming version of Microsoft Edge will finally implement unicode-range, the last modern browser to do so. Preload and font-display are landing in Safari and Firefox. Variable fonts are shipping everywhere. Using custom fonts in a performant way is becoming far easier. Let’s take a peek at some things we can do when using custom fonts to make sure we’re being as performant as we can be. 1) Reduce the File Size Far from containing only numbers, the Latin alphabet and common punctuation, many fonts support multiple languages and include thousands of additional glyphs, adding significantly to the file size. The Mac tool Font Book can display all the available glyphs in a font. In these cases, subsetting is useful. Subsetting is the removal of characters you don’t need. You can do this using the command line tool…

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Understanding Web Fonts and Getting the Most Out of Them

Thierry Blancpain is a brand and interaction designer at Informal Inquiry in New York City and co-founder of Grilli Type, a Swiss type foundry. While this article is generally applicable to all web fonts, Grilli Type fonts are used throughout as examples of the concepts, particularly those demonstrating OpenType features. Using your own fonts instead of system fonts is getting easier, but it’s still an evolving field. We’ll go over the different types of font formats and cover tips and best practices for them in this post. We’ll also dive into more in-depth features for those of you who want to level up and aim to perfect the craft with advanced concepts and considerations when using web fonts. In the end, you’ll hopefully feel equipped not only to put web fonts to use but to get the most out of them. Here we go! Font Formats When you purchase web…

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Paradigming Triangle

I found some very, very old business cards from days long gone… This one was from one of the very first “consulting” companies that I had created. I was building stuff in Flash and also custom CMS software for folks, small scripts that could update the site, even when it was in Flash. I learned a ton during these formative years, not only about technology and software but also about how to run a business and work with partners. You can see, the business card design has my brother’s email address. He was doing a lot of the “business” end of things during that time while I was building the apps. I’m not sure how many clients I served through this company but it wasn’t very many. That didn’t upset me or depress me a single bit. I just kept moving. The post Paradigming Triangle appeared first on John Saddington. Source:…

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A Look Back at the History of CSS

When you think of HTML and CSS, you probably imagine them as a package deal. But for years after Tim Berners-Lee first created the World Wide Web in 1989, there was no such thing as CSS. The original plan for the web offered no way to style a website at all. There’s a now-infamous post buried in the archives of the WWW mailing list. It was written by Marc Andreessen in 1994, who would go on to co-create both the Mosaic and Netscape browsers. In the post, Andreessen remarked that because there was no way to style a website with HTML, the only thing he could tell web developers when asked about visual design was, “sorry you’re screwed.” 10 years later, CSS was on its way to full adoption by a newly enthused web community. *W**hat happened along the way?* Finding a Styling Language There were plenty of ideas for…

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Full-Stack Product Developer – Treeline Interactive – San Diego, CA

Treeline Interactive is searching for a Web Developer to join our growing Development Team. Flash, PHP, Python, Javascript, Node.js, Drupal, Laravel, WordPress,…From Treeline Interactive – Sat, 23 Sep 2017 06:46:46 GMT – View all San Diego, CA jobs Source: http://rss.indeed.com/rss?q=Drupal+Developer

Boston Drupal Meetup Considers Distributions

The topic was “Distributions” at the September Boston Drupal Meetup, which was held at Acquia HQ in downtown Boston, and attendees were treated to an unusually comprehensive session. That’s because Drupal Project Lead Dries Buytaert kicked off the meeting by going waaay back, to the very first Drupal “distro.” To back up a bit, a distribution is a combination of Drupal core + modules + configuration + documentation — all bundled up and optimized for a particular purpose or group of users. And the very first distro, according to Dries: DeanSpace, the campaign management system used by Howard Dean during his brief, but notable, campaign for President of the United States in 2004. At the time, Drupal was relatively unknown, and DeanSpace gave the platform a boost. Ever since, Dries said, he’s been bullish about distributions: they help Drupal get into new places, and they reduce the burden of selecting…

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Crafting Webfont Fallbacks

There is a great bit in here where Glen uses Font Style Matcher to create some CSS for a fallback font that has font-size, line-height, font-weight, letter-spacing, and word-spacing adjusted so perfectly that when the web font does load, the page hardly shifts at all. Like barely noticeable FOUT. Maybe we’ll call it FOCST (Flash of Carefully Styled Text). Direct Link to Article — Permalink Crafting Webfont Fallbacks is a post from CSS-Tricks Source: CssTricks

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