Category Archive for: development

rfp-robotRFP ROBOT: Website Request for Proposal Generator

The time has come for a new website (or website redesign), which means you need to write a website request for proposal or web RFP. A Google search produces a few examples, but they vary wildly and don’t seem to speak really to your goals for developing or redesigning a new website. You need to write a website RFP that will clearly articulate your needs and generate responses from the best website designers and developers out there. But how?

Have no fear, RFP Robot is here. He will walk you through a step-by-step process to help you work through the details of your project and create a PDF formatted website design RFP that will provide the information vendors need to write an accurate bid. RFP Robot will tell you what info you should include, point out pitfalls, and give examples.


The Modlet Workflow: Improve Your Development Workflow with StealJS

You’ve been convinced of the benefits the modlet workflow provides and you want to start building your components with their own test and demo pages. Whether you’re starting a new project or updating your current one, you need a module loader and bundler that doesn’t require build configuration for every test and demo page you want to make. StealJS is the answer. It can load JavaScript modules in any format (AMD, CJS, etc.) and load other file types (Less, TypeScript, etc.) with plugins. It requires minimum configuration and unlike webpack, it doesn’t require a build to load your dependencies in development. Last but not least, you can use StealJS with any JavaScript library or framework, including CanJS, React, Vue, etc. In this tutorial, we’re going to add StealJS to a project, create a component with Preact, create an interactive demo page, and create a test page. Article Series: The Key…

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Announcing Node.js on Acquia Cloud

Today, Acquia announced that it expanded Acquia Cloud to support Node.js, the popular open-source JavaScript runtime. This is a big milestone for Acquia as it is the first time we have extended our cloud beyond Drupal. I wanted to take some time to explain the evolution of Acquia’s open-source stack and why this shift is important for our customers’ success. From client-side JavaScript to server-side JavaScript JavaScript was created at Netscape in 1995, when Brendan Eich wrote the first version of JavaScript in just 10 days. It took around 10 years for JavaScript to reach enterprise maturity, however. Adoption accelerated in 2004 when Google used JavaScript to build the first release of Gmail. In comparison to e-mail competitors like Yahoo! Mail and Hotmail, Gmail showed what was possible with client-side JavaScript, which enables developers to update pages dynamically and reduces full-page refreshes and round trips to the server. The benefit…

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Business Development Assistant – Chromatic – United States

This not only ensures our code quality but more so, makes us better developers. We have over 10 years experience helping some of the web’s biggest brands solve…From Chromatic – Wed, 20 Sep 2017 03:02:35 GMT – View all United States jobs Source: http://rss.indeed.com/rss?q=Drupal+Developer

Node.js and Headless Drupal on Acquia Cloud

The press release went out this morning with the headline, Acquia Debuts Node.js and Headless Drupal on Acquia Cloud. The subhed: “Company Expands Upon Drupal Cloud Solutions for Web and Flexible Content Applications.” The news: Acquia today unveiled a new application service for Acquia Cloud that makes it easy for digital IT teams to build and run JavaScript alongside Drupal. Acquia Cloud now supports the use of Node.js in addition to Drupal. The Dries quote: “Decoupled applications using JavaScript front ends are on the rise. They’re making it possible to create experiences with responsive, elegant, application-like behavior. To help our customers build such digital experiences with headless Drupal, we added Node.js support to Acquia Cloud.” Why it’s important: Developers will now be able to leverage tools enabling continuous delivery and integration across Node.js and Drupal from one user interface. IT professionals benefit from one secure, compliant cloud for Drupal, decoupled Drupal,…

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The Key to Building Large JavaScript Apps: The Modlet Workflow

You’re a developer working on a “large JavaScript application” and you’ve noticed some issues on your project. New team members struggle to find where everything is located. Debugging issues is difficult when you have to load the entire app to test one component. There aren’t clean API boundaries between your components, so their implementation details bleed one into the next. Updating your dependencies seems like a scary task, so your app doesn’t take advantage of the latest upgrades available to you. One of the key realizations we made at Bitovi was that “the secret to building large apps is to never build large apps.” When you break your app into smaller components, you can more easily test them and assemble them into your larger app. We follow what we call the “modlet” workflow, which promotes building each of your components as their own mini apps, with their own demos, documentation,…

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Chrome to force .dev domains to HTTPS via preloaded HSTS

Mattias Geniar: A lot of (web) developers use a local .dev TLD for their own development. … In those cases, if you browse to http://site.dev, you’ll be redirect[ed] to https://site.dev, the HTTPS variant. That means your local development machine needs to; Be able to serve HTTPs Have self-signed certificates in place to handle that Have that self-signed certificate added to your local trust store (you can’t dismiss self-signed certificates with HSTS, they need to be ‘trusted’ by your computer) This is probably generally A Good Thing™, but it is a little obnoxious to be forced into it on Chrome. They knew exactly what they were doing when they snatched up the .dev TLD. Isn’t HSTS based on the entire domain though, not just the TLD? Direct Link to Article — Permalink Chrome to force .dev domains to HTTPS via preloaded HSTS is a post from CSS-Tricks Source: CssTricks

Who sponsors Drupal development? (2016-2017 edition)

Last year, Matthew Tift and I examined Drupal.org’s commit data to understand who develops Drupal, how much of that work is sponsored, and where that sponsorship comes from. We published our analysis in a blog post called “Who Sponsors Drupal Development?”. A year later, I wanted to present an update. This year’s report will also cover additional data, including gender and geographical diversity, and project sponsorship. Understanding how an open-source project works is important because it establishes a benchmark for project health and scalability. Scaling an open-source project is a difficult task. As an open-source project’s rate of adoption grows, the number of people that benefit from the project also increases. Often the open-source project also becomes more complex as it expands, which means that the economic reward of helping to improve the project decreases. A recent article on the Bitcoin and Ethereum contributor communities illustrates this disparity perfectly. Ethereum…

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How to Create a Custom jQuery Plugin

jQuery is, in my humble opinion, the best Javascript library. Much of jQuery’s popularity is due to the fact that it considerably reduces development time. Their slogan is “write less, do more”, which is a great summary of jQuery’s benefits. What make jQuery really great are the plugins. Plugins are reusable portions of code which help you write even less Javascript to achieve specific features on the client side. For example, you can use plugins to create slideshows, galleries, popups and more. In this tutorial, you will learn how to create your own custom jQuery plugin in 4 easy steps. Let’s start… [[ This is a content summary only. Visit http://OSTraining.com for full links, other content, and more! ]] Source: https://www.ostraining.com/

Selling Pickaxes During the Cryptocurrency Gold Rush

This post was written over 6 years ago but it’s more applicable than ever, especially during the bitcoin and cryptocurrency craze that’s sweeping around the world. But my brother has gone in the opposite direction and instead of focusing entirely on the more sexy things like working on an ICO (which essentially is peak-crypto) he’s building digital pickaxes that’ll form the very foundation of a long-standing business that’ll be impervious to market movements. As Chris mentioned in the post, it was far better to sell pickaxes to the droves of folks who came west in their quest to mine for (real) gold instead of spending all that time trying to mine directly: This is of course an allusion to the California Gold Rush where some of the most successful business people such as Levi Strauss and Samuel Brannan didn’t mine for gold themselves but instead sold supplies to miners – wheelbarrows, tents, jeans, pickaxes etc.…

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Compilers are the New Frameworks

Tom Dale: Increasingly, the bytes that get shipped to browsers will bear less and less resemblance to the source code that web developers write. Indeed. I suspected the same: Because performance matters so much and there is so much opportunity to get clever with performance, we’ll see innovation in getting our code bases to production. Tools like webpack (tree shaking, code splitting) are already doing a lot here, but there is plenty of room to let automated tools work magic on how our code ultimately gets shipped to browsers. Tom also says: This is a loss in some ways (who else got their web development start with View Source?) but is a huge win for users, particularly in emerging markets. It seems to me today’s world of GitHub, StackOverflow, and the proliferation of learning resources more than make up for learning via our own website spelunking, not to mention how…

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Basecamp 3 for iOS: Hybrid Architecture

We’ve written quite a bit in the past about our approach to building hybrid mobile apps. Basecamp 3 represents the latest generation of this architecture, taking everything we’ve learned from previous versions.The first app for Basecamp 2 app was iPhone only, written in RubyMotion as a thin wrapper around UIWebView. Next, we did a new universal app for Basecamp 2, written in Xcode + Objective-C, still a using UIWebView, but with a bit more native code thrown in. For Basecamp 3, we’ve replaced Objective-C with Swift, UIWebView with WKWebView and added Turbolinks, with even more native code, and a deeper integration between native and web.Defining HybridFirst, it helps to be clear about what we mean by “hybrid”. That term is used in so many different contexts, that it’s almost meaningless. In our use, we’re referring to standard native apps where a significant portion of the content is rendered using web technology.…

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Upgrade Your JavaScript Error Monitoring

(This is a sponsored post.)Automatically detect and diagnose JavaScript errors impacting your users with Bugsnag. Get comprehensive diagnostic reports, know immediately which errors are worth fixing, and debug in a fraction of the time compared to traditional tools. Bugsnag detects every single error and prioritizes errors with the greatest impact on your users. Get support for 50+ platforms and integrate with the development and productivity tools your team already uses. Bugsnag is used by the world’s top engineering teams including Airbnb, Pandora, MailChimp, Square, Shopify, Yelp, Lyft, Docker, and Cisco. Start your free trial today. Direct Link to Article — Permalink Upgrade Your JavaScript Error Monitoring is a post from CSS-Tricks Source: CssTricks

So You Want To Be a Senior Developer?

Let me start with a classic caveat: I cannot bestow upon you the title of senior developer. I have no special insight into how companies these days are hiring and promoting people to senior developer roles. What I can tell you is what qualities I think would make for a heck of a senior developer. I can tell you how I think about the distinction between senior developers and those who aren’t quite there yet. Should I, one day, be in charge of a legion of developers where it was my call what level they were at, this is what I would think about. A senior front end developer has experience. There is no way around this one. You aren’t going to roll into your first job a senior developer. You probably won’t roll into any new job a senior developer. Even if I was pretty sure a person was…

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Revisiting our Fantasy Football Exploration

In 2015 Viget launched one of our most popular explorations around the future of fantasy football. As avid fans and players, we were interested in exploring the intersection of three of our biggest passions: technology, experience design, and sports. Our goal was to consider improvements to the fantasy football interfaces as well as concepts to push the fantasy experience beyond the screen. Through our research we specifically focused on designs for a more immersive draft experience, enhanced league communications, and better access to more statistical analysis. Two years has passed and the fantasy landscape is still booming with no signs of slowing down. As we start our 6th season of fantasy football at Viget we decided to dust off the ole exploration from the trophy shelf and see whether or not our ideas still hold water—or gatorade—or, well, you get the point. Looking back, what began as a “wouldn’t it…

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Boston Drupal Meetup Considers Distributions

The topic was “Distributions” at the September Boston Drupal Meetup, which was held at Acquia HQ in downtown Boston, and attendees were treated to an unusually comprehensive session. That’s because Drupal Project Lead Dries Buytaert kicked off the meeting by going waaay back, to the very first Drupal “distro.” To back up a bit, a distribution is a combination of Drupal core + modules + configuration + documentation — all bundled up and optimized for a particular purpose or group of users. And the very first distro, according to Dries: DeanSpace, the campaign management system used by Howard Dean during his brief, but notable, campaign for President of the United States in 2004. At the time, Drupal was relatively unknown, and DeanSpace gave the platform a boost. Ever since, Dries said, he’s been bullish about distributions: they help Drupal get into new places, and they reduce the burden of selecting…

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For the love of God, please tell me what your company does

Kasper Kubica goes on a humorous rant about the way companies describe themselves on their websites: More and more often, upon discovering a new company or product, I visit their website hoping to find out what it is they do, but instead get fed a mash of buzzwords about their “team” and “values”. And this isn’t a side dish — this is the main entrée of these sites, with a coherent explanation of the company’s products or services rarely occupying more than a footnote on the menu. While many of the examples and points are funny at their core, there’s clearly a level of frustration laced between the lines and it’s easy to understand why: At this point, I’ve given up. I’m back to Google, back to searching … because even though I came to [the site] knowing exactly what I wanted, I have no idea what they offer. While this isn’t…

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When Design Becomes Part of the Code Workflow

I recently did an experiment where I created the same vector illustration in three different applications, exported the illustration as SVG in each application, then wrote a post comparing the exported code. While I loved the banter and insights that came in the comments, I was surprised that the bulk of conversation was centered on the file size of the compiled SVG. I wasn’t surprised because performance and SVG do not go hand-in-hand or that performance isn’t the sort of thing we generally care about in the front-end community. I was surprised because my personal takeaway from the experiment was a reminder that SVG code is code at the end of the day and that the way we create SVG in applications is now more a part of the front-end workflow than perhaps it has been in the past. I still believe that is the key point from the post…

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6 Reasons Why Web Design Is Not A Dying Profession

In recent years, there have been many concerns about web design as a profession. People are worried that the major advancements in technology, especially artificial intelligence, are a threat to this field. However, a group of people still argues that there’s still hope. So, we’ll be taking a look at reasons why web design is not a dying profession.   Why Is It Seen As A Dying Profession? Before we get started on the reasons why web design isn’t a dying profession, let’s see why people think it is. In this article, the term web design will be used to refer to both design and front end development. This involves the process of designing the website and coding the design. If you’ve been using the internet, then you’ve definitely noticed numerous adverts for both free and paid website builders. These types of websites allow users to create fully functional websites…

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Senior Development Engineer Job position is open

San Ramon, CA, United States Source: https://jobs.drupal.org/all-jobs/feed

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