Category Archive for: developers

rfp-robotRFP ROBOT: Website Request for Proposal Generator

The time has come for a new website (or website redesign), which means you need to write a website request for proposal or web RFP. A Google search produces a few examples, but they vary wildly and don’t seem to speak really to your goals for developing or redesigning a new website. You need to write a website RFP that will clearly articulate your needs and generate responses from the best website designers and developers out there. But how?

Have no fear, RFP Robot is here. He will walk you through a step-by-step process to help you work through the details of your project and create a PDF formatted website design RFP that will provide the information vendors need to write an accurate bid. RFP Robot will tell you what info you should include, point out pitfalls, and give examples.


web developers Visalia CA

Pixeldust offers consulting services for specifications, strategy, prototyping, website audits, project management, and development.

Getting Started with Vue Plugins

In the last months, I’ve learned a lot about Vue. From building SEO-friendly SPAs to crafting killer blogs or playing with transitions and animations, I’ve experimented with the framework thoroughly. But there’s been a missing piece throughout my learning: plugins. Most folks working with Vue have either comes to rely on plugins as part of their workflow or will certainly cross paths with plugins somewhere down the road. Whatever the case, they’re a great way to leverage existing code without having to constantly write from scratch. Many of you have likely used jQuery and are accustomed to using (or making!) plugins to create anything from carousels and modals to responsive videos and type. We’re basically talking about the same thing here with Vue plugins. So, you want to make one? I’m going to assume you’re nodding your head so we can get our hands dirty together with a step-by-step guide…

Read More →

The Way We Talk About CSS

There’s a ton of very quotable stuff from Rachel Andrew’s latest post all about CSS and how we talk about it in the community: CSS has been seen as this fragile language that we stumble around, trying things out and seeing what works. In particular for layout, rather than using the system as specified, we have so often exploited things about the language in order to achieve far more complex layouts than it was ever designed for. We had to, or resign ourselves to very simple looking web pages. Rachel goes on to argue that we probably shouldn’t disparage CSS for being so weird when there are very good reasons for why and how it works — not to mention that it’s getting exponentially more predictable and powerful as time goes by: There is frequently talk about how developers whose main area of expertise is CSS feel that their skills…

Read More →

Styling the Gutenberg Columns Block

WordPress 5.0 is quickly approaching, and the new Gutenberg editor is coming with it. There’s been a lot of discussion in the WordPress community over what exactly that means for users, designers, and developers. And while Gutenberg is sure to improve the writing experience, it can cause a bit of a headache for developers who now need to ensure their plugins and themes are updated and compatible. One of the clearest ways you can make sure your theme is compatible with WordPress 5.0 and Gutenberg is to add some basic styles for the new blocks Gutenberg introduces. Aside from the basic HTML blocks (like paragraphs, headings, lists, and images) that likely already have styles, you’ll now have some complex blocks that you probably haven’t accounted for, like pull quotes, cover images, buttons, and columns. In this article, we’re going to take a look at some styling conventions for Gutenberg blocks,…

Read More →

web developers North Las Vegas NV

Pixeldust offers consulting services for specifications, strategy, prototyping, website audits, project management, and development.

From a world wide web to a personal web

Last week, I had a chance to meet with Inrupt, a startup founded by Sir Tim Berners-Lee, who is best known as the inventor of the World Wide Web. Inrupt is based in Boston, so their team stopped by the Acquia office to talk about the new company. To learn more about Inrupt’s founding, I recommend reading Tim Berners-Lee’s blog or Inrupt’s CEO John Bruce’s announcement. Inrupt is on an important mission Inrupt’s mission is to give individuals control over their own data. Today, a handful of large platform companies (such as Facebook) control the media and flow of information for a majority of internet users. These companies have profited from centralizing the Open Web and lack transparent data privacy policies on top of that. Inrupt’s goal is not only to improve privacy and data ownership, but to take back power from these large platform companies. Inrupt will leverage Solid,…

Read More →

The next big jump in Basecamp accessibility!

How we made the Basecamp 3 Jump Menu accessibleThe Basecamp 3 Jump MenuEarlier this year I wrote about How we stopped making excuses and started improving Basecamp’s accessibility. Accessibility improvements in Basecamp 3 have come in two ways: All new features we’ve shipped over the past year and a half have been designed and tested to meet WCAG AA guidelines (The Web Content Accessibility Guidelines, or WCAG, provides a shared standard that web developers can follow to make sure their products are accessible).At the same time, we’ve gone back and retrofitted existing features and interactions for better accessibility. Today I’m excited to announce that we just completed some significant improvements to the Basecamp 3 Jump Menu!The jump menu has always been the quickest way for getting to a person, project, recently visited page, and My assignments/bookmarks/schedule /drafts/latest activity. Here’s a look at it in action:Note the small-ish “Press ⌘+J to show the menu” labelIn…

Read More →

Manager, Marketing Automation Systems – Tableau – Seattle, WA

In addition, this role works closely with marketing operations program teams, website developers, and business systems….From Tableau – Thu, 04 Oct 2018 00:03:55 GMT – View all Seattle, WA jobs Source: http://rss.indeed.com/rss?q=Drupal+Developer

Manager, Marketing Operations – Tableau – Seattle, WA

In addition, this role works closely with marketing operations program teams, website developers, and business systems….From Tableau – Thu, 04 Oct 2018 00:03:55 GMT – View all Seattle, WA jobs Source: http://rss.indeed.com/rss?q=Drupal+Developer

Experience Express in Darmstadt: Celebrating Drupal 8's Most Important Release Yet

Though there was no DrupalCon Europe this year, the European Drupal community stepped up and organized their own conference, Drupal Europe, in Darmstadt, Germany last month. An incredibly successful gathering held in the Darmstadtium venue, a beautiful convention center in the center of this college town, Drupal Europe demonstrated the unique power that grassroots initiatives can have in our open-source community. Drupal Europe came at a particularly important time in the Drupal community as we welcomed the latest and most important release in Drupal 8’s history, with exciting new features such as embedded media support (such as YouTube videos), support for file uploads via REST, and substantial improvements in many other areas. At the same time, as Dries Buytaert said during his keynote, it is now time for the community to begin considering how Drupal 9, which will be released in 2020, will look. Because it was an intensely busy…

Read More →

The Codification of Design

Jonathan Snook on managing the complexity between what designers make and what developers end up building: Everything that a designer draws in a Sketch or Photoshop file needs to be turned into code. Code needs to be developed, delivered to the user, and maintained by the team. That means that complexity in design can lead to complexity in code. That’s not to say that complexity isn’t allowed. However, it is important to consider what the impact of that complexity is—especially as it relates to your codebase. Jonathan continues in that post to argue that designers and developers need to be in a constant feedback loop in order to properly assess whether the complexity of the design is worth the complexity of the engineering solution. I’ve been thinking about this sort of thing for a really long time as it applies to my work in design systems — I have a…

Read More →

Selectors That Depend on Layout

“Why the heck don’t we have ::first-column?” I heard someone ask that the other day and it’s a valid question. I’d even take that question further by asking about ::nth-column() or whatever else relates to CSS columns. We have stuff like ::first-letter and ::first-line. Why not others? There are many notable things missing from the “nth” crowd. Seven years ago, I wrote “A Call for ::nth-everything” and it included clear use cases like, perhaps, selecting the first two lines of a paragraph. I don’t know all the technical details of it all, but I know there are some fairly decent reasons why we don’t have all of these in CSS. Part of it is the difficulty of getting it specced (e.g. words and characters get tricky across written languages) and part of it is the difficulty of implementing them. What I just found out is that there is a FAQ…

Read More →

Netlify

(This is a sponsored post.)It’s always fun to watch developers discover Netlify for the first time. It’s so easy. One way to do it is to just literally drag and drop a folder onto them and it will be online. Even better, connect a Git repo to a Netlify site and tell it what branch you want to watch, then any commits to that branch will automatically go live, even running your site’s build as it does it. I heard one developer say, “It’s like someone actually designed hosting and deployment.” That lends itself nicely to static sites, but don’t think that static sites are only for certain types of sites or limiting in some way. That’s what the JAMstack is all about! Wanna learn more about that? Come to JAMstack_conf! Netlify does a ton to help you power your JAMstack site as well. They’ll process your forms. They’ll help…

Read More →

Test out the cloud platform developers love for free with a $100 credit

(This is a sponsored post.)DigitalOcean invites you to experience a better, faster and simpler cloud platform designed to scale based on your needs. Get started for free with a $100 credit toward your first project and discover why the most innovative companies are already hosting on DigitalOcean. Direct Link to Article — PermalinkThe post Test out the cloud platform developers love for free with a $100 credit appeared first on CSS-Tricks. Source: CssTricks

A Minimal JavaScript Setup

Some people prefer to write JavaScript with React. For others, it’s Vue or jQuery. For others still, it is their own set of tools or a completely blank document. Some setups are minimal, some allow you to get things done quickly, and some are crazy powerful, allowing you to build complex and maintainable applications. Every setup has advantages and disadvantages, but positives usually outweigh negatives when it comes to popular frameworks verified and vetted by an active community. React and Vue are powerful JavaScript frameworks. Of course they are — that’s why both are trending so high in overall usage. But what is it that makes those, and other frameworks, so powerful? Is it the speed? Portability to other platforms like native desktop and mobile? Support of the huge community? The success of a development team starts with an agreement. An agreement of how things are done. Without an agreement,…

Read More →

The “Developer Experience” Bait-and-Switch

Alex Russell describes his thoughts on the current state of JavaScript and how we might sometimes put a ton of focus on the ease-of-use of development at the expense of user experience. So, for example, we might pick a massive framework to make development easier and faster but then that might have an enormous impact on the user. Alex describes it as substituting “developer value for user value.” The “developer experience” bait-and-switch works by appealing to the listener’s parochial interests as developers or managers, claiming supremacy in one category in order to remove others from the conversation. The swap is executed by implying that by making things better for developers, users will eventually benefit equivalently. The unstated agreement is that developers share all of the same goals with the same intensity as end users and even managers. This is not true. Here’s the kicker, though: JavaScript is the web’s CO2.…

Read More →

The Complete Guide to Lazy Loading Images

Images are critical. Whether it is marketing banners, product images or logos, it is impossible to imagine a website without images. Sadly though, images are often heavy files making them the single biggest contributor to the page bloat. According the HTTP Archive’s State of Images report, the median page size on desktops is 1511 KB and images account for nearly 45% (650 KB) of that total. That said, it’s not like we can simply do away with images. They’re too important to the overall user experience. Instead, we need to make our web pages load really fast with them. In this guide, we will cover all of the ins and outs of lazy loading images, a technique that helps improve the time it takes for a web page to load by deferring image loads until they are needed. Before we dive right in, here is a sample video that demonstrates…

Read More →

15 Best Browser Extensions for Developers (2018)

The biggest change for 2018 has been the major overhaul of FireFox, and with it the way add-ons work in that browser. As a result, many popular add-ons are no longer being maintained or have become unavailable. Most add-ons for Firefox are also available as extensions for Google Chrome. In this article, we’ll try to give preference to cross-browser add-ons / extensions, which within this context means they’ll work on Firefox, Chrome, and Chromium. We’ll also give preference to free extensions that aren’t known to pass your information to third parties and are not supported by ad revenue. We’ll focus more on extensions that don’t restrict you to a particular development technology. Few developers would see any advantage in using Microsoft Edge as a development browser, but it is fine for post-development testing. Only a little over 4 in every 100 site visitors can be expected to be using it,…

Read More →

All Fired Up About Specificity

You never know where the next Grand Debate™ in front-end is going to come from! Case in point: we just saw one recently based on a little Twitter poll by Max Stoiber in which 57% of people got it wrong. There were reactions ranging from the innocuous hey fun a little brain teaser! to the state of web education is in shambles and beyond. I heard from a number of folks that they just felt sad that so many people don’t know the answer to a fairly simple question. To be fair, it was (intentionally, I’m sure) rather tricky! It wasn’t really a question about CSS — it was more about the idea that the order of HTML attributes doesn’t matter. It’s the order of CSS that does. One extreme response I saw said that front-end stuff like this is needlessly complicated and getting it wrong is almost a point…

Read More →

Back to Top