Category Archive for: custom

rfp-robotRFP ROBOT: Website Request for Proposal Generator

The time has come for a new website (or website redesign), which means you need to write a website request for proposal or web RFP. A Google search produces a few examples, but they vary wildly and don’t seem to speak really to your goals for developing or redesigning a new website. You need to write a website RFP that will clearly articulate your needs and generate responses from the best website designers and developers out there. But how?

Have no fear, RFP Robot is here. He will walk you through a step-by-step process to help you work through the details of your project and create a PDF formatted website design RFP that will provide the information vendors need to write an accurate bid. RFP Robot will tell you what info you should include, point out pitfalls, and give examples.


Building the Best Relationships We Can

Maslow had it wrong. To get it right, we have to move social needs to the bottom of his pyramid.-Matthew Lieberman (Professor of Social Cognitive Neuroscience at UCLA and author of the book Social)Babies would die without their caregivers at birth. Study after study show the pain and ill we go through when we are isolated from others like us. As humans, we are wired to connect to one another.However, instead of connecting, we seem to be heading the opposite direction. On the streets and in restaurants people are looking at their phones instead of the person right next to them.Businesses strive to make everything quicker, faster, and automated. Sending automated welcome emails with generic information to everyone who signs up. Introducing artificial intelligence to weed through support inquiries instead of having someone read and respond to your query.It’s important to us here at Highrise to help people build great relationships. For many of our…

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Intro to Hoodie and React

Let’s take a look at Hoodie, the “Back-End as a Service” (BaaS) built specifically for front-end developers. I want to explain why I feel like it is a well-designed tool and deserves more exposure among the spectrum of competitors than it gets today. I’ve put together a demo that demonstrates some of the key features of the service, but I feel the need to first set the scene for its use case. Feel free to jump over to the demo repo if you want to get the code. Otherwise, join me for a brief overview. Setting the Scene It is no secret that JavaScript is eating the world these days and with its explosion in popularity, an ever-expanding ecosystem of tooling has arisen. The ease of developing a web app has skyrocketed in recent years thanks to these tools. Developer tools Prettier and ESLint give us freedom to write how…

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Drupal is Good?

Before joining Viget I built websites on Drupal for Congressmen and Fortune 500 companies. Those websites were good, and they’re visited by millions of people. I’ve been to Drupal Cons, I’ve been to Drupal meet-ups, and I’ve given presentations on Drupal topics. I wouldn’t have a career as a developer without Drupal, but I wouldn’t recommend Drupal. “So if not Drupal, then what?” It depends. Anyone who says they know the solution before they know the problem is lying, wrong, or guessing. At Viget, we can figure out what the best solution is to a problem. That solution may be a static website, a solution with Contentful, a Craft site, a custom-built CMS, or something we haven’t thought of yet. It depends on the project. We’ve written about this before. We have come up with reasons to go off-the-shelf or to go custom-built. We have compared off-the-shelf CMS’s and we…

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Glue Cross-Browser Responsive Irregular Images with Sticky Tape

I recently came across this Atlas of Makers by Vasilis van Gemert. Its fun and quirky appearance made me look under the hood and it was certainly worth it! What I discovered is that it was actually built making use of really cool features that so many articles and talks have been written about over the past few years, but somehow don’t get used that much in the wild – the likes of CSS Grid, custom properties, blend modes, and even SVG. SVG was used in order to create the irregular images that appear as if they were glued onto the page with the pieces of neon sticky tape. This article is going to explain how to recreate that in the simplest possible manner, without ever needing to step outside the browser. Let’s get started! The first thing we do is pick an image we start from, for example, this…

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Making a Custom, Acquia-Hosted Site Affordable for Higher Ed

With budget cuts and rising expectations, higher education websites have become a challenging balancing act of function and affordability. As one of the main marketing tools to prospective students, higher ed websites increasingly need to do it all. They have to be responsive, accessible, easily navigated, support the brand, contain large bodies of complex content that often require custom functionality not standard in CMSes, and be future-proof enough to last 5-7 years — the next time funds might be available to rework the website. And if those hurdles aren’t enough, institutions typically have limited budgets and limited staff to maintain their web presences. Over the past decade we’ve seen patterns in the needs, challenges, and wants of our higher ed clients. There is clearly a need for a virtual “off-the-shelf” website solution that: Specifically meets the content and functional needs of higher ed institutions Allows room to infuse websites with…

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The Structure of an Elm Application

Most languages when they are in their infancy, tend to be considered “toy languages” and are only used for trivial or small projects. But this is not the case with Elm, where its true power shines in complex and large applications. It is not only possible to build some parts of an application in Elm and integrate those components into a larger JS application, but it is also possible to build the entire application without touching any other language making it an excellent alternative to JS frameworks like React. In this article, we will explore the structure of an Elm application using a simple site to manage plain-text documents as an example. Article Series: Why Elm? (And How To Get Started With It) Introduction to The Elm Architecture and How to Build our First Application The Structure of an Elm Application (You are here!) Some of the topics covered in…

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If It Ain’t Baroque, Don’t Fix It

Illustration by Nate OttoBen and Larry are longtime owners of two different music-related businesses, a payroll service for musicians and an auctioneer of rare classical LPs. They don’t know each other, but they have something in common: They’re both still running their businesses on custom software written in the 1980s by the same developer. This episode features the soothing, nostalgic hum of a dot matrix printer, variations on “Three Blind Mice,” and more!https://medium.com/media/dea2cb92713e898f75eaf5c125312bd3/hrefTranscriptWAILIN: Do you remember your first computer? Ben does. He got his first computer in 1986, when he hired a programmer to write some custom software for his business.BEN: I was frightened beyond reason and little by little, I got the hang of it. Those computers at that time were just old DOS machines.TROY HENIKOFF: It was a Compaq desktop, and the reason it was a Compaq was because the IBM PC ran at 4.77 megaherz, but the Compaq ran…

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Google AdWords Editor 12 is Now Available: Here’s What’s New by @MattGSouthern

Version 12 of Google’s AdWords Editor is now available worldwide to all advertisers. In addition to a new design, new features in AdWords Editor 12 include custom rules, faster account downloads, support for bidding to maximize conversions, and more. Refreshed Design Google has updated the design of AdWords Editor to make the look and feel more consistent with the rest of Google’s products. The new material design will not change how AdWords Editor is used, the update is purely cosmetic. Custom Rules AdWords Editor 12 allows advertisers to set custom rules for ads according to the advertiser’s own best practices. […]The post Google AdWords Editor 12 is Now Available: Here’s What’s New by @MattGSouthern appeared first on Search Engine Journal. Source: https://www.searchenginejournal.com/feed/

Building Community Sites in Drupal 8: A Guide To D8 Modules For Community Support Sites

Introduction Drupal 8 is a very flexible framework for creating a Community support  Site.  Most of the functionality of the community site can be achieved via custom content types, views, and related entities, and by extending various core classes.  You no longer need special-purpose modules such as Blog or Forum. This document will introduce several useful modules in Drupal 8 that are typically used when building a community site. Source: https://www.phase2technology.com/feed/

Form Validation – Part 4: Validating the MailChimp Subscribe Form

Over the last few articles in this series, we’ve learned how to use a handful of input types and validation attributes to natively validate forms. We’ve learned how to use the Constraint Validation API to enhance the native browser validation process for a better overall user experience. And we wrote a polyfill to extend support all the way back to IE9 (and plug a few feature holes in some newer versions). Now, let’s take what we’ve learned and apply it to a real example: the MailChimp signup form. Article Series: Constraint Validation in HTML The Constraint Validation API in JavaScript A Validity State API Polyfill Validating the MailChimp Subscribe Form (You are here!) A simple form with a large footprint When you embed a MailChimp signup form on your site, it comes with a JavaScript validation script named `mc-validate.js`. This file is 140kb (minified), and includes the entire jQuery library,…

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Form Validation Part 2: The Constraint Validation API (JavaScript)

In my last article, I showed you how to use native browser form validation through a combination of semantic input types (for example, <input type=”email”>) and validation attributes (such as required and pattern). While incredibly easy and super lightweight, this approach does have a few shortcomings. You can style fields that have errors on them with the :invalid pseudo-selector, but you can’t style the error messages themselves. Behavior is also inconsistent across browsers. User studies from Christian Holst and Luke Wroblewski (separately) found that displaying an error when the user leaves a field, and keeping that error persistent until the issue is fixed, provided the best and fastest user experience. Unfortunately, none of the browsers natively behave this way. However, there is a way to get this behavior without depending on a large JavaScript form validation library. Article Series: Constraint Validation in HTML The Constraint Validation API in JavaScript (You…

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Form Validation Part 1: Constraint Validation in HTML

Most JavaScript form validation libraries are large, and often require other libraries like jQuery. For example, MailChimp’s embeddable form includes a 140kb validation file (minified). It includes the entire jQuery library, a third-party form validation plugin, and some custom MailChimp code. In fact, that setup is what inspired this new series about modern form validation. What new tools do we have these days for form validation? What is possible? What is still needed? In this series, I’m going to show you two lightweight ways to validate forms on the front end. Both take advantage of newer web APIs. I’m also going to teach you how to push browser support for these APIs back to IE9 (which provides you with coverage for 99.6% of all web traffic worldwide). Finally, we’ll take a look at MailChimp’s sign-up form, and provide the same experience with 28× (2,800%) less code. It’s worth mentioning that…

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Decoupling Drupal with Waterwheel for Ember and React

As I’ve written previously, the Waterwheel ecosystem and Reservoir distribution help pave the way for non-Drupal developers to use decoupled Drupal as a headless back end without having to learn a lick of Drupal or PHP. Thanks to the Contenta team, there is now a growing slate of applications backed by decoupled Drupal and web services modules like JSON API and Simple OAuth. Now, the Waterwheel team is excited to release several new projects that benefit developers developing JavaScript applications built in Ember and React. With the release of reference applications in Ember and React and an Ember add-on, the Waterwheel ecosystem is moving beyond SDKs like Waterwheel.js and toward a larger range of plugins, boilerplates, and examples to help you develop your Drupal-backed JavaScript applications more swiftly. Best of all, these projects can be used interchangeably to build applications backed by API-first Drupal 8 with JSON API, Acquia’s just-released…

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Reactive UI’s with VanillaJS – Part 2: Class Based Components

In Part 1, I went over various functional-style techniques for cleanly rendering HTML given some JavaScript data. We broke our UI up into component functions, each of which returned a chunk of markup as a function of some data. We then composed these into views that could be reconstructed from new data by making a single function call. This is the bonus round. In this post, the aim will be to get as close as possible to full-blown, class-based React Component syntax, with VanillaJS (i.e. using native JavaScript with no libraries/frameworks). I want to make a disclaimer that some of the techniques here are not super practical, but I think they’ll still make a fun and interesting exploration of how far JavaScript has come in recent years, and what exactly React does for us. Article Series: Pure Functional Style Class Based Components (You are here!) From functions to classes Let’s…

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How to Build Your Own Alexa Service

With the recent introduction of Amazon and Google products that provide Ironman-esque voice control functionality, we’ve been wondering lately what this means for the future of human computer interactions. Always on the lookout for emerging technology to get ahead of, we decided to put a project together to see what these little devices are capable of. We had about 2 weeks before the three Viget offices were assembling for an all hands gathering, so we wanted to something both fun and interactive. What we ended up with was an Alexa service that could figure out which Viget employee you were thinking about. We called it: The Know It All Trying out our latest Viget team game using voice control. Can you guess who? More updates soon! cc @alexadevs @amazonecho #Alexa pic.twitter.com/M1YgCh3obj— Viget (@viget) June 13, 2017 There are a couple pieces to this puzzle – a Rails backend, a React…

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Enter the dot matrix

Illustration by Nate OttoTroy Henikoff was a college student in 1984 when he wrote his first program, a piece of software to help his grandfather’s steel warehouse manage their inventory. That summer project led Troy to start his own software consulting business a couple years later. This is an atypical Distance story about beginnings, endings and unexpected legacies.https://medium.com/media/e1b07d80fba4e2163e3f63e0c604a1a0/hrefTranscriptWAILIN: Troy Henikoff describes himself as an unintentional entrepreneur. Today he’s a well-known figure in Chicago’s tech scene, but when he began dabbling in computer programming and setting up his own business, there was no established startup culture for him to absorb. No networking events, no hoodies, no cliches about hustle or crushing it or changing the world. Troy’s story starts in 1984, at his grandfather’s steel warehouse on Chicago’s south side. He had just finished his sophomore year of college.TROY HENIKOFF: So that summer when I got to Chicago, I was given a bunch…

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New Class: The Wright Framework for Joomla Templates

Wright is bootstrapped, responsive and lightweight. It’s the best Joomla framework you’ll find anywhere. In this week’s class, “The Wright Framework for Joomla templates”, you’ll learn how to use Wright to quickly create your own custom Joomla templates. Simon Kloostra shows you how to install Wright and use Wright’s default styles to quickly set up your template. You’ll learn how Wright provides you with many of the Bootstrap’s key features and components. You’ll also be able to safely customize your template using custom CSS and PHP files that won’t be overrridden during any updates. [[ This is a content summary only. Visit http://OSTraining.com for full links, other content, and more! ]] Source: https://www.ostraining.com/

10 Steps to Building Faster Websites

Google says websites should load in less than 2-3 seconds and when Google speaks you better damn well listen. Actually, it’s not only Google that comes up with numbers like this; countless studies say you want to be hitting the 2-second benchmark to stop traffic and valuable leads running out the door. There’s a problem, though. As the web becomes a more complex medium, performance tends to take a backseat to glitzy features. Which is fine, if you want a fancy website hidden behind that blank loading screen, but not so good when most people quit the session before your first line of content loads. So how do you find that sweet-spot between a fully-featured website and one that hits the 2-second benchmark? #1: Be careful with website builders Website builders are great for building websites quickly but quite so good when it comes to loading times. Bulky code working under the…

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