Category Archive for: css

rfp-robotRFP ROBOT: Website Request for Proposal Generator

The time has come for a new website (or website redesign), which means you need to write a website request for proposal or web RFP. A Google search produces a few examples, but they vary wildly and don’t seem to speak really to your goals for developing or redesigning a new website. You need to write a website RFP that will clearly articulate your needs and generate responses from the best website designers and developers out there. But how?

Have no fear, RFP Robot is here. He will walk you through a step-by-step process to help you work through the details of your project and create a PDF formatted website design RFP that will provide the information vendors need to write an accurate bid. RFP Robot will tell you what info you should include, point out pitfalls, and give examples.


Some Things I Recommend

Howdy. I’m taking this week’s “Sponsored Post” to give a shout out to some apps, courses, and services that I personally like. These things also have affiliate programs, meaning if you buy the thing, we earn a portion of that sale, which supports this site. That money goes to pay people to write the things we publish. That said, everything on this list is something that I’m happy going on the record endorsing. PixelSnap: A macOS Toolbar app for getting pixel dimensions from anywhere on the screen. Way handier than trying to use ⌘-⇧-4 for that. An Introduction to Gutenberg by Joe Casabona: We just had a ShopTalk episode about how Gutenburg (a new editor) is coming to WordPress. There is certainly stuff to learn, and this is a course you can take to do that learning. React for Beginners: Speaking of learning, this Wes Bos course will get you…

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The JavaScript Learning Landscape in 2018

Raise your hand if this sounds like you: You’ve been in the tech industry for a number of years, you know HTML and CSS inside-and-out, and you make a good living. But, you have a little voice in the back of your head that keeps whispering, “It’s time for something new, for the next step in your career. You need to learn programming.” Yep, same here. I’ve served in a variety of roles in the tech industry for close to a decade. I’ve written a bunch of articles on design, coding, HTML, and CSS. Hell, I’ve even written a few books and spoken at conferences around the world. But there’s still that voice that keeps telling me I need to tackle programming; that I’ll never be fulfilled until I learn how to develop my own ideas and projects from scratch. Being a web guy, the obvious language to learn: JavaScript.…

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Gotchas When Publishing Modules in npm and Bower

Bower and npm are de-facto the package managers of the web. I doubt there are many front-end developers out there who haven’t heard of them or used them to manage dependencies. Whilst many of us use them as consumers, one day you might decide to share a project of your own and become a contributor! This happened to me recently. I had the experience of publishing my open-source library on npm and Bower. Although their official docs were quite good, I still ended up struggling with three little known gotchas. I won’t focus on the basics in this post. You can always find and read about them. I’ll instead focus on the gotchas. Nowadays, it looks like even Bower tells people not to use Bower. However, in 2018, there are still many projects that depend on it. The state of JavaScript in 2017 survey shows that around 24% of surveyed…

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Twenty years later and I am still at my desk learning CSS

I was working on my POSSE plan when Vanessa called and asked if I wanted to meet for a coffee. Of course, I said yes. In the car ride over, I was thinking about how I made my first website over twenty years ago. HTML table layouts were still cool and it wasn’t clear if CSS was going to be widely adopted. I decided to learn CSS anyway. More than twenty years later, the workflows, the automated toolchains, and the development methods have become increasingly powerful, but also a lot more complex. Today, you simply npm your webpack via grunt with vue babel or bower to react asdfjkl;lkdhgxdlciuhw. Everything is different now, except that I’m still at my desk learning CSS. Source: Dries Buytaert www.buytaert.net

The Red Reveal: Illusions on the Web

In part one of a series of posts about optical illusions on the web, Dan Wilson looks at how to create the “Red Reveal” that he happens to describe like this: Growing up, my family played a lot of board games. Several games such as Outburst, Password, and Clue Jr. included something that amazed me at the time — a red lens and cards with some light blue text that was obscured by a myriad of red lines. When you put the red lens over the card, the text would magically appear. Here’s one example of that effect from a nifty Pen: I’d also recommend reading part two in this series, Barrier Grid Animation, which uses a bunch of CSS techniques to trick your eye into seeing an animation of several static images. Direct Link to Article — Permalink The Red Reveal: Illusions on the Web is a post from…

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My Talk Writing Process

Some people have a talk preparation process that is super organized and runs like a well-oiled machine. Mine, on the other hand, is a bit messy, but it works for me. Even when a talk looks polished and put together on stage, it doesn’t mean the process to get it there was that way too. Me on stage at An Event Apart. When putting together a new talk recently, I noticed there was most definitely a pattern to how my talks take shape. Here’s how the talk-making process goes for me: The Research Phase True to the nature of research, all my talks start by collecting articles, books, videos, and other things that relate to the topic of the talk. At this point in the talk development process, I usually only have a general topic idea instead of a fully fleshed out point-of-view or main message. That means I end…

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Shipping system fonts to GitHub.com

System font stacks got hot about a year ago, no doubt influenced by Mark Otto’s work putting them live on GitHub. The why, to me, feels like (1) yay performance and (2) the site looks like the rest of the operating system. But to Mark: Helvetica was created in 1957 when the personal computer was a pipe dream. Arial was created in 1982 and is available on 95% of computers across the web. Millions, if not billions, of web pages currently use this severely dated font stack to serve much younger content to much younger browsers and devices. As display quality improves, so too must our use of those displays. System fonts like Apple’s San Francisco and Microsoft’s Segoe aim to do just that, taking advantage of retina screens, dynamic kerning, additional font-weights, and improved readability. If operating systems can take advantage of these changes, so too can our CSS.…

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CSS Basics: Fallback Font Stacks for More Robust Web Typography

In CSS, you might see a ruleset like this: html { font-family: Lato, “Lucida Grande”, Tahoma, Sans-Serif; } What the heck, right? Why don’t I just tell it what font I want to use and that’s that? The whole idea here is fallbacks. The browser will try to use the font you specified first (Lato, in this case), but if it doesn’t have that font available, it will keep going down that list. So to be really verbose here, what that rule is saying is: I’d like to use the Lato font here, please. If you don’t have that, try “Lucida Grande” next. If you don’t have that, try Tahoma. All else fails, use whatever you’ve got for the generic keyword Sans-Serif So in what situation would a browser not have the font you’re asking for? That’s pretty common. There are only a handful of fonts that are considered “web…

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Your Sketch library is not a design system redux

I really like this post by Brad Frost about what is and isn’t a design system, particularly when he de-emphasizes the importance of tools when it comes to that sort of work : …components living inside static design tools like Sketch isn’t itself a design system. Pardon my clickbait. Perhaps a better title would have been “Your Sketch library is not a(n entire) design system.” No doubt tools like Sketch are super valuable, and having a set of reusable components inside them helps design teams establish thoughtful and consistent UIs. However, a Sketch library is just one piece of the design system puzzle. A design system also can include other puzzle pieces like: Design principles UX guidelines Development guidelines Coded UI components Component guidelines, usage, and details Page templates User flows Design tools Dev tooling Code repositories Voice and tone guidelines Implementation guides Contribution processes Team structure Resources (internal and…

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CSS Basics: Styling Links Like a Boss

The web was founded on links. The idea that we can click/tap a link and navigate from one web page to another is how surfin’ the web become a household phrase. Links in HTML even look different from regular text without any CSS styling at all. See the Pen Default Link by CSS-Tricks (@css-tricks) on CodePen. They are blue (purple if visited). They are underlined. That’s a link in it’s purest form. But what if we want to change things up a bit? Perhaps blue doesn’t work with your website’s design. Maybe you have an aversion to underlines. Whatever the reason, CSS lets us style links just we can any other element. All we need to do is target the <a> element in our stylesheet. Want to use a different font, change the color, remove the underline and make it all uppercase? Sure, why not? a { color: red; text-decoration:…

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CSS Basics: Using Multiple Backgrounds

With CSS, you can control the background of elements. You can set a background-color to fill it with a solid color, a background-image to fill it with (you guessed it) an image, or even both: body { background-color: red; background-image: url(pattern.png); } Here’s an example where I’m using an SVG image file as the background, embedded right in the CSS as a data URL. See the Pen background color and image together by Chris Coyier (@chriscoyier) on CodePen. That’s just a single image there, repeated, but we can actually set multiple background images if we want. We do that by separating the values with commas. body { background-image: url(image-one.jpg), url(image-two.jpg); } If we leave it like that, image-one.jpg will repeat and entirely cover image-two.jpg. But we can control them individually as well, with other background properties. body { background-image: url(image-one.jpg), url(image-two.jpg); background-position: top right, /* this positions the first image…

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CSS Basics: The Second “S” in CSS

CSS is an abbreviation for Cascading Style Sheets. While most of the discussion about CSS on the web (or even here on CSS-Tricks) is centered around writing styles and how the cascade affects them, what we don’t talk a whole lot about is the sheet part of the language. So let’s give that lonely second “S” a little bit of the spotlight and understand what we mean when we say CSS is a style sheet. The Sheet Contains the Styles The cascade describes how styles interact with one another. The styles make up the actual code. Then there’s the sheet that contains that code. Like a sheet of paper that we write on, the “sheet” of CSS is the digital file where styles are coded. If we were to illustrate this, the relationship between the three sort of forms a cascade: The sheet holds the styles. There can be multiple…

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Observable

Observable launched a couple of weeks ago. As far as I understand, it’s sort of like a mix between CodePen and Medium where you create “notebooks” for exploring data, making nifty visualizations. Check out this collection of visualizations using map integrations as an example. The entries are not only nice demos of the libraries or technology being used (i.e. D3, Google Maps, Leaflet, etc.), but also make for some interesting infographics in themselves. In a note about this interesting new format, founder Mike Bostock describes a notebook as “an interactive, editable document defined by code. It’s a computer program, but one that’s designed to be easier to read and write by humans.” All of this stuff riffs on a lot of Mike’s previous work which is definitely worth exploring further if you’re a fan of complex visualizations on the web. Direct Link to Article — Permalink Observable is a post…

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CSS Grid Layout Module Level 2

The second iteration of CSS Grid is already in the works and the public editor’s draft was released last week! While it is by no means the final W3C recommendation, this draft is the start of discussions around big concepts many of us have been wanting to see since the first level was released, including subgrids: In some cases it might be necessary for the contents of multiple grid items to align to each other. A grid container that is itself a grid item can defer the definition of its rows and columns to its parent grid container, making it a subgrid. In this case, the grid items of the subgrid participate in sizing the grid of the parent grid container, allowing the contents of both grids to align. The currently defined characters of subgrid items are particularly interesting because they illustrate the differences between a subgrid and its parent…

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CSS Basics: Using Fallback Colors

Something you very much want to avoid in web design is unreadable text. That can happen when the background color of an element is too close or exactly the color of the text. For instance: .header { background-color: white; color: white; } Which could lead to text that’s there, but invisible. This is … very bad. You’d never do that on purpose of course! The trouble is it can sneak up on you. For one thing, the default background-color is transparent, so without setting any background the background of an element is probably white. More commonly, you’re using a background-image that makes the background a different color, and you’re setting white text on top of that. header { background-image: url(plants.jpg); color: white; } Under perfect circumstances, this is all good: But let’s take a look at what it looks like while the website is loading over a very common “Slow…

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CSS Basics: The Syntax That Matters & The Syntax That Doesn’t

When you’re starting to play around with CSS at the very beginning, like any other language, you have to get used to the syntax. Like any syntax, there are a bunch of little things you need to know. Some characters and the placement of them is very important and required for the CSS to work correctly. And some characters are more about clean looking code and generally followed standards but don’t matter for the CSS to work. First, so we have the terminology down: A CSS ruleset consists of a selector and delcaration(s) wrapped in curly braces. Important: Braces All CSS rulesets must have opening and closing curly braces: braces.header { padding: 20px;}.header padding: 20px;}.header { padding: 20px;}.header padding: 20px; If you miss the opening brace, CSS will keep reading as if the next bit of text is still part of the selector. Then it’s likely to find a character…

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Stimulus

A modest JavaScript framework for the HTML you already have. This will appeal to anyone who is apprehensive about JavaScript being required to generate HTML, yet wants a modern framework to help with modern problems, like state management. I wonder if this would be a good answer for things like WordPress or CraftCMS themes that are designed to be server side but, like any site, could benefit from client-side JavaScript enhancements. Stimulus isn’t really built to handle SPAs, but instead pair with Turbolinks. That way, you’re still changing out page content with JavaScript, but all the routing and HTML generation is server side. Kinda old school meets new school. Direct Link to Article — Permalink Stimulus is a post from CSS-Tricks Source: CssTricks

Article Performance Leaderboard

A clever idea from Michael Donohoe: pit websites against each other in a performance battle! Donohoe is a long-time newsroom guy, so this is specifically about article pages for major publications. Lets state the obvious, this is an imperfect and evolving measure and the goal is to foster discussion and rivalry in making our pages better, faster, and lighter. Bear in mind this was built as an internal tool at Hearst Newspapers to track changes as we rollout our new Article template on mobile for SFGate and eventually all sites (SF Chronicle, Houston Chronicle, Times Union, etc). Developers, designers, and product need to talk more on how to achieve this. A 1,700 word article might weigh 10KB but by the time you load HTML, JS, CSS, images, 3rd-parties, and ads, it can range between 2MB to 8MB depending on the web site. Bear in mind, the first Harry Potter ebook…

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PixelSnap

Forever I’ve used the macOS Command-Shift-4 screenshot utility to measure things. Pressing it gets you a little crosshairs cursor which you can click-and-drag to take a screenshot but, crucially, has little numbers that tell you the width/height of the selection in pixels. It’s crude, but ever so useful. See those teeny-tiny numbers in the bottom-right? So useful, even if they are tough to read. PixelSnap is one of those apps that, once you see it, you’re like OMG that’s the best idea ever. It’s the same kind of interaction (key command, then mouse around), but it’s drawing lines between obvious measurement points in any window at all. Plus it has this drag around and area and snap to edges thing that’s just as brilliant. Instant purchase for me. The Product Hunt newsletter said: Two teenage makers launched PixelSnap, a powerful design tool to measure every pixel on your screen. Hit…

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