Category Archive for: building a website

rfp-robotRFP ROBOT: Website Request for Proposal Generator

The time has come for a new website (or website redesign), which means you need to write a website request for proposal or web RFP. A Google search produces a few examples, but they vary wildly and don’t seem to speak really to your goals for developing or redesigning a new website. You need to write a website RFP that will clearly articulate your needs and generate responses from the best website designers and developers out there. But how?

Have no fear, RFP Robot is here. He will walk you through a step-by-step process to help you work through the details of your project and create a PDF formatted website design RFP that will provide the information vendors need to write an accurate bid. RFP Robot will tell you what info you should include, point out pitfalls, and give examples.


Zoey is An Advanced Ecommerce Platform for Web Designers and Agencies

Inspired Magazine Inspired Magazine – creativity & inspiration daily It’s often tough to argue that one ecommerce building platform is faster than another, unless you complete an unbiased speed test with a large sample size. However, sometimes you can objectively say that a system is faster just by playing around with it. That seems to be the case with Zoey, seeing as how during my tests I was able to launch a few ecommerce websites within minutes, and they actually looked great out of the box and I was technically able to start collecting payments from customers. Granted, my sites were made for testing, but the same experience can be transferred over to regular developers. And that’s exactly what Zoey is trying to achieve. The company isn’t necessarily attempting to bring in regular ecommerce entrepreneurs, but rather the web designers who are making hundreds, or thousands, of ecommerce sites for clients.…

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Building a Website Performance Monitor

A couple of months ago I wrote about using WebPageTest, and more specifically its RESTful API, to monitor the performance of a website. Unarguably, the data it provides can translate to precious information for engineers to tweak various parts of a system to make it perform better. But how exactly does this tool sit within your development workflow? When should you run tests and what exactly do you do with the results? How do you visualise them? Now that we have the ability to obtain performance metrics programmatically through the RESTful API, we should be looking into ways of persisting that data and tracking its progress over time. This means being able to see how the load time of a particular page is affected by new features, assets or infrastructural changes. I set out to create a tool that allowed me to compile and visualise all this information, and I…

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