Category Archive for: Apple

rfp-robotRFP ROBOT: Website Request for Proposal Generator

The time has come for a new website (or website redesign), which means you need to write a website request for proposal or web RFP. A Google search produces a few examples, but they vary wildly and don’t seem to speak really to your goals for developing or redesigning a new website. You need to write a website RFP that will clearly articulate your needs and generate responses from the best website designers and developers out there. But how?

Have no fear, RFP Robot is here. He will walk you through a step-by-step process to help you work through the details of your project and create a PDF formatted website design RFP that will provide the information vendors need to write an accurate bid. RFP Robot will tell you what info you should include, point out pitfalls, and give examples.


Marketing Podcasts: 11 Resources Worth Listening To

How many Marketing Podcasts are you subscribed to? Podcasts are on the rise. This is sanctioned by data. The total number of active podcasts shows is currently over 550,000, as Apple confirmed at WWDC 2018 in early June, for a total of over 18.5 million episodes. How to know who’s going to offer you the best advice Read more Source: https://adespresso.com/feed/

The Ecological Impact of Browser Diversity

Early in my career when I worked at agencies and later at Microsoft on Edge, I heard the same lament over and over: “Argh, why doesn’t Edge just run on Blink? Then I would have access to ALL THE APIs I want to use and would only have to test in one browser!” Let me be clear: an Internet that runs only on Chrome’s engine, Blink, and its offspring, is not the paradise we like to imagine it to be. As a Google Developer Expert who has worked on Microsoft Edge, with Firefox, and with the W3C as an Invited Expert, I have some opinions (and a number of facts) to drop on this topic. Let’s get to it. What is a browser, even? Let’s clear up some terminology. Popular browsers you know today include Google Chrome, Apple Safari, Mozilla Firefox, and Microsoft Edge, but in the past we’ve also…

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Our vacation at Acadia National Park

For our 2018 family vacation, we wanted to explore one of America’s National Parks. We decided to take advantage of one of the national parks closest to us: Acadia National Park in Maine. Day 1: Driving around Mount Desert Island An aerial photo of our rental house near Bar Harbor, Maine.We rented a house on the water near Bar Harbor. So on our first morning we explored the beach area around the house. In good tradition, the boys collected some sticks to practice their ninja moves and ninja sword fighting. Both also enjoyed throwing their “ninja stars” (rocks) into what they called “fudge” (dried up piles of seaweed). The ninja stars landed with a nice, soggy “plop”. When not being pretend ninjas, Axl’s favorite part of exploring the beach was finding sea life in the tidal pools. For Stan it was collecting various crab shells in hopes to glue them…

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Utiliser un VPN pour iPad : pourquoi et lequel choisir ?

La sécurité sur internet est à l’heure actuelle au coeur de nos sociétés, car les utilisateurs ne veulent plus être victimes de vols de données ou d’utilisations à mauvais escient de leurs informations de connexion. Suite aux nombreux scandales qui ont éclatés liés aux données, de nombreux internautes se sont tournés vers les outils de protection, comme les antivirus ou les VPN. Et pas uniquement sur un ordinateur ! Dans cet article, nous allons tout vous dire sur les meilleurs VPN pour iPad, afin que vous puissiez trouver le meilleur fournisseur pour protéger votre tablette.  Si vous n’en avez jamais entendu parlé, nous vous ferons une petite présentation de cet outil, pour que vous sachiez à quoi il sert et comment il fonctionne. Nous vous expliquerons également pourquoi il s’agit d’un indispensable de votre sécurité, compatible avec un antivirus par exemple pour assurer une sécurité plus complète. Enfin, nous vous…

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Chrome 69

Chrome 69 is notable for us CSS developers: Conic gradients (i.e. background: conic-gradient(red, green, blue);): We’ve got lots of interesting articles about conic gradients here, and here’s some use cases and a polyfill from Lea Verou. Logical box model properties: margin, padding, and border all get an upgrade for more use cases. Think of how we have margin-left now — the “left” part doesn’t make much sense when we switch directions. Now, we’ll have margin-inline-start for that. The full list is margin-{block,inline}-{start,end}, padding-{block,inline}-{start,end} and border-{block,inline}-{start,end}-{width,style,color}. Here’s Rachel Andrew with Understanding Logical Properties And Values. Scroll snap points (i.e. scroll-snap-type: x mandatory;): What once required JavaScript intervention is now happily in CSS. We’ve been covering this for years. Goes a long way in making carousels way less complicated. Environment variables (i.e. env(safe-area-inset-top);): Apple introduced “the notch” with the iPhone X and dropped some proprietary CSS for dealing with it. The community…

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Nintendo Switch Does Multiple Accounts Right

Multiple Accounts in a product is a difficult to design for. It’s not a typical thing, though. Most have just one Google, Apple, Instagram account. However, some might want to share an iPad or HomePod with family. Since those don’t support multiple accounts, the owner’s profile ends up overrun by someone else’s preferences. It’s an edge case that’s difficult to design.Basecamp 3, the product for which I design the Android app for, does support multiple accounts. You can flip between your Personal Basecamp, Work Basecamp, and other Basecamps you’re part of. The design keeps each Basecamp’s data and preferences separate.A few months ago our family got a Nintendo Switch. I didn’t think too much about how easy it is to share. The system is so intuitive that you actually don’t have to think about it too much. It wasn’t until today that I really looked at how simple and elegant the…

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Meilleur VPN gratuit pour Mac : la sélection de la rédaction

Les menaces sont partout sur internet, et vos données de connexions ne sont pas aussi protégées qu’elles n’y paraissent. Il devient donc primordial de sécuriser ses accès à internet, quel que soit l’appareil sur lequel on se rend sur internet. Souvent, on dit des ordinateurs, tablettes et téléphones Apple qu’ils sont beaucoup plus protégés que les autres faces aux virus et autres malwares. Si cela pourrait même être nuancé, sachez qu’en tout cas pour les données personnelles de connexion, ils subissent les mêmes difficultés que les autres.  L’utilisation du meilleur VPN gratuit pour Mac est donc indispensable si vous souhaitez protéger efficacement vos informations lorsque vous utilisez internet. C’est ce que nous allons vous aider à trouver grâce à cet article. Nous allons tout d’abord vous expliquer le fonctionnement d’un VPN gratuit, et vous expliquer pourquoi ces solutions ne sont pas fiables et peuvent même vous mettre encore plus en…

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Render Children in React Using Fragment or Array Components

What comes to your mind when React 16 comes up? Context? Error Boundary? Those are on point. React 16 came with those goodies and much more, but In this post, we’ll be looking at the rendering power it also introduced — namely, the ability to render children using Fragments and Array Components. These are new and really exciting concepts that came out of the React 16 release, so let’s look at them closer and get to know them. Fragments It used to be that React components could only return a single element. If you have ever tried to return more than one element, you know that you’ll will be greeted with this error: Syntax error: Adjacent JSX elements must be wrapped in an enclosing tag. The way out of that is to make use of a wrapper div or span element that acts as the enclosing tag. So instead of…

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The Apple App Store

The Apple App Store is now 10 years old and, for many of us, we can’t imagine life without it. For me, being part of the much smaller population that has fully participated in all that the App Store has to offer (e.g. launching apps for download and sale into it) I couldn’t be more grateful for what Apple has done in this department. Being part of the larger mobile revolution (or evolution…?) has transformed my thinking permanently in regards to business-building, product design and development, customer support and even sales and marketing. And, having access to a global audience has been incredibly rewarding and has resulted in some pretty decent results. The App Store is now a big part of my story and I’m, again, so grateful for it. 9to5Mac has a great post on the design evolution of the store and some of the apps that launched with…

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Hyperlinking Beyond the Web

Hyperlinks are the oldest and the most popular feature of the web. The word hypertext (which is the ht in http/s) means text having hyperlinks. The ability to link to other people’s hypertext made the web, a web — a set of connected pages. This fundamental feature has made the web a very powerful platform and it is obvious that the world of apps needs this feature. All modern platforms support a way for apps to register a URI (custom protocol) and also have universal links (handling web links in an app). Let’s see why we’d want to take advantage of this feature and how to do it. Why have app links at all? Creating URIs that apps can open provides a unique set of benefits. A URL encapsulates the entire state of the webpage (it used to before the advent of Single Page Applications (SPAs) heavy with JavaScript and…

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Temperature Check

One of our colleagues on the Basecamp customer support team, Jayne Ogilvie, wanted to find out how other tech companies with remote staffs handle issues like communication, career development, and hiring. Jayne sent out a survey and got back a wealth of information and ideas about how other teams work together. In this episode of Rework, we hear more from two participating companies: Sarah Park of MeetEdgar talks about how their staff gathers internal feedback on important decisions, and Patrick Filler and Anitra St. Hilaire of Harvest talk about taking on the challenge of making their company more diverse and inclusive.https://medium.com/media/abfc039586f501c486b8c39aa809a78f/hrefNext week, we’ll release a bonus conversation with Sarah Park about MeetEdgar’s culture of transparency and open meetings. Make sure you’re subscribed via Apple Podcasts, Google Play Music, RadioPublic, or the app of your choice so you don’t miss it!Temperature Check was originally published in Signal v. Noise on Medium, where…

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Delivering WordPress in 7KB

Over the past six months, I’ve become increasingly interested in the topic of web sustainability. The carbon footprint of the Internet was not something I used to give much thought to, which is surprising considering my interest in environmental issues and the fact that my profession is web-based. The web in a warming world As a brief recap, I attended MozFest in London last year. In between sessions, I was scanning a noticeboard to see what was coming up, and I spotted a session entitled, “Building a Planet-Friendly Web.” I felt a little dumbstruck. What on Earth was this going to be about? I attended the session and the scales fell from my eyes. In what now seems obvious — but at the time was a revelation — I learned of the colossal energy demand of the Internet. This demand makes it the largest coal-fired machine on Earth, meaning that…

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Drawing Images with CSS Gradients

What I mean by “CSS images” is images that are created using only HTML elements and CSS. They look as if they were SVGs drawn in Adobe Illustrator but they were made right in the browser. Some techniques I’ve seen used are tinkering with border radii, box shadows, and sometimes clip-path. You can find a lot of great examples if you search daily css images” on CodePen. I drew some myself, including this Infinity Gauntlet, but in one element with only backgrounds and minimal use of other properties. Let’s take a look at how you can create CSS images that way yourself. The Method Understanding the shorthand background syntax as well as how CSS gradients work is practically all you need to draw anything in one element. As a review, the arguments are as follows: background: <‘background-color’> || <image> || <position> [ / <size> ]? || <repeat> || <attachment> ||…

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World wide wrist

After all the hubbub with WWDC over the past couple of days, Ethan Marcotte is excited about the news that the Apple Watch will be able to view web content. He writes: If I had to guess, I’d imagine some sort of “reader mode” is coming to the Watch: in other words, when you open a link on your Watch, this minified version of WebKit wouldn’t act like a full browser. Instead of rendering all your scripts, styles, and layout, mini-WebKit would present a stripped-down version of your web page. If that’s the case, then Jen Simmons’s suggestion is spot-on: it just got a lot more important to design from a sensible, small screen-friendly document structure built atop semantic HTML. But who knows! I could be wrong! Maybe it’s a more capable browser than I’m assuming, and we’ll start talking about best practices for layout, typography, and design on watches.…

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Learning Gutenberg: Modern JavaScript Syntax

One of the key changes that Gutenberg brings to the WordPress ecosystem is a heavy reliance on JavaScript. Helpfully, the WordPress team have really pushed their JavaScript framework into the present and future by leveraging the modern JavaScript stack, which is commonly referred to as ES6 in the community. It’s how we’ll refer to it as in this series too, to avoid confusion. Let’s dig into this ES6 world a bit, as it’s ultimately going to help us understand how to structure and build a custom Gutenberg block. Article Series: Series Introduction What is Gutenberg, Anyway? A Primer with create-guten-block Modern JavaScript Syntax (This Post) React 101 (Coming Soon!) Setting up a Custom webpack (Coming Soon!) A Custom “Card” Block (Coming Soon!) What is ES6? ES6 is short for “EcmaScript 6” which is the 6th edition of EcmaScript. It’s official name is ES2015, which you may have also seen around.…

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It All Started With Emoji: Color Typography on the Web

“Typography on the web is in single color: characters are either black or red, never black and red …Then emoji hit the scene, became part of Unicode, and therefore could be expressed by characters — or “glyphs” in font terminology. The smiley, levitating businessman and the infamous pile of poo became true siblings to letters, numbers and punctuation marks.” — Roel Nieskens Using emojis in code is easy. Head over to emojipedia and copy and paste one in. In HTML: Or in CSS: And JavaScript, too: (Alternatively, you can specify emoji with a Unicode codepoint.) However, you might run into a problem… Lost in translation: Emoji’s consistency problem The diversity of emoji across platforms might not sound like a major problem. However, these sometimes radical inconsistencies leave room for drastic miscommunication. Infamously, the “grinning face with smiling eyes” emoji ends up as a pained grimace on older Apple systems. This…

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When the Macintosh was Apple's financial lifeline

© Asymco I love this graph. It shows that for some time, Apple’s primary source of revenue was the sale of the Macintosh computer. The Macintosh provided Apple with a bridge between the desktop era and the mobile era, represented by the two clusters on the graph. That bridge was a financial lifeline. Without it, Apple might not have survived. Source: Dries Buytaert www.buytaert.net

Trading fashion for function

I’ve been using my new Apple Watch 3 for several months, and recently I’ve been in the market for a new band. Previously, I was using a standard synthetic rubber band. I’d come home from work, and the first thing I wanted to do was take my Apple Watch off. I didn’t like the clammy feel of the band, and the fit was either too loose or too tight. This week, I decided to try the new Sport Loop. I’m currently in Chicago visiting our Acquia office, and it’s pretty warm out. The Sport Loop has proven to been a great alternative. It is made out of woven nylon, it’s breathable and it has a little bit of stretch. It’s not going to win fashion awards, but it is comfortable enough to wear all day and I no longer feel the urge to take off my watch in the evening. …

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CSS Environment Variables

We were all introduced to the env() function in CSS when all that drama about “The Notch” and the iPhone X was going down. The way that Apple landed on helping us move content away from those “unsafe” areas was to provide us essentially hard-coded variables to use: padding: env(safe-area-inset-top) env(safe-area-inset-right) env(safe-area-inset-bottom) env(safe-area-inset-left); Uh ok! Weird! Now, nine months later, an “Unofficial Proposal Draft” for env() has landed. This is how specs work, as I understand it. Sometimes browser vendors push forward with stuff they need, and then it’s standardized. It’s not always waiting around for standards bodies to invent things and then browser vendors implementing those things. Are environment variables something to get excited about? Heck yeah! In a sense, they are like a more-limited version of CSS Custom Properties, but that means they can be potentially used for more things. CSS environment variables are getting standardized:https://t.co/QKFBM3WFT2Allow to get…

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