Category Archive for: APIs

rfp-robotRFP ROBOT: Website Request for Proposal Generator

The time has come for a new website (or website redesign), which means you need to write a website request for proposal or web RFP. A Google search produces a few examples, but they vary wildly and don’t seem to speak really to your goals for developing or redesigning a new website. You need to write a website RFP that will clearly articulate your needs and generate responses from the best website designers and developers out there. But how?

Have no fear, RFP Robot is here. He will walk you through a step-by-step process to help you work through the details of your project and create a PDF formatted website design RFP that will provide the information vendors need to write an accurate bid. RFP Robot will tell you what info you should include, point out pitfalls, and give examples.


Cloud Storage as a CDN Option

Inspired Magazine Inspired Magazine – creativity & inspiration daily If you have a slow site, probably on shared server that receives a lot of traffic, you may be able to speed things up a bit by hosting some of your content on a Content Delivery Network (CDN). Unfortunately traditional CDN is often priced out of reach for a small business website, but the good news is there is a way to set up cloud storage drives to act as your own personal CDN systems. In this article we’ll discover some methods for doing that. Cloud storage CDN emulation vs pure CDN The main difference is cost and volume. Pure CDN usually works out cheaper for high traffic volumes and more expensive for low traffic volumes. Because a typical small business isn’t likely to see the kind of traffic that would make pure CDN worth it, emulating CDN functionality with cloud…

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An Introduction to Node.js

Decoupled applications are increasing in popularity as brand experiences continue to move beyond the traditional website. Although your content management system (CMS) might house your content alongside Drupal, it doesn’t just stay put. APIs are making calls to extend that content to things like digital signage, kiosks, mobile … really, the sky’s the limit (as long as there’s an API). Decoupled applications are nothing new; Acquia CTO and Founder Dries Buytaert has been writing about this for at least two years. And we’ve been working with clients, such as Princess Cruises and Powdr, to build decoupled experiences and applications for their customers. Why is decoupled Drupal becoming so popular? We see a number of benefits both from our customers’ perspective as well as from our partners. The primary use case for decoupled relates to when our customers need a single source of truth for content that supports multiple applications. Drupal’s…

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Reservoir: a Simple Way to Decouple Drupal

Cross-posted from Dries’ blog Decoupled Drupal seems to be taking the world by storm. I’m currently in Sydney, and everyone I talked to so far, including the attendees at the Sydney Drupal User Group, is looking into decoupled Drupal. Digital agencies are experimenting with it on more projects, and there is even a new Decoupled Dev Days conference dedicated to the topic. Roughly eight months ago, we asked ourselves in Acquia’s Office of the CTO whether we could create a “headless” version of Drupal, optimized for integration with a variety of applications, channels and touchpoints. Such a version could help us build bridges with other developer communities working with different frameworks and programming languages, and the JavaScript community in particular. I’ve been too busy with the transition at Acquia to blog about it in real time, but a few months ago, we released Reservoir. It’s a Drupal-based content repository with…

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Form Validation with Web Audio

I’ve been thinking about sound on websites for a while now. When we talk about using sound on websites, most of us grimace and think of the old days, when blaring background music played when the website loaded. Today this isn’t and needn’t be a thing. We can get clever with sound. We have the Web Audio API now and it gives us a great deal of control over how we design sound to be used within our web applications. In this article, we’ll experiment with just one simple example: a form. What if when you were filling out a form it gave you auditory feedback as well as visual feedback. I can see your grimacing faces! But give me a moment. We already have a lot of auditory feedback within the digital products we use. The keyboard on a phone produces a tapping sound. Even if you have “message…

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Decoupled Drupal: POWDR’s Front End Architecture Build

This is the last installment in the decoupled Drupal project we’ve working on with Elevated Third and Hoorooh Digital. The project we’re documenting was one we worked on for Powdr Resorts, one of the largest ski operators in North America. The first installment in the series was A Deep Dive into a Decoupled Drupal 8 Project. Part two offered a radical change of altitude, from Andy Mead, Drupal Developer at Elevated Third: Decoupled Drupal: A 10,000-foot View. Part 3 was on Decoupled Drupal Technologies and Techniques In this final installment in the series, Denny Cunningham, Lead Front End Developer at Hoorooh Digital at Hoorooh Digital, discusses the three main areas that needed to be addressed during the build of POWDR’s front end architecture: Routing & Syncing with the API, Component Driven Content, and the Build Process & Tools. Introduction For a front end developer, there’s no shortage of tools available.…

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Reservoir, a simple way to decouple Drupal

Decoupled Drupal seems to be taking the world by storm. I’m currently in Sydney, and everyone I talked to so far, including the attendees at the Sydney Drupal User Group, is looking into decoupled Drupal. Digital agencies are experimenting with it on more projects, and there is even a new Decoupled Dev Days conference dedicated to the topic. Roughly eight months ago, we asked ourselves in Acquia’s Office of the CTO whether we could create a “headless” version of Drupal, optimized for integration with a variety of applications, channels and touchpoints. Such a version could help us build bridges with other developer communities working with different frameworks and programming languages, and the JavaScript community in particular. I’ve been too busy with the transition at Acquia to blog about it in real time, but a few months ago, we released Reservoir. It’s a Drupal-based content repository with all the necessary web…

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Using the Paint Timing API

It’s a great time to be a web performance aficionado, and the arrival of the Paint Timing API in Chrome 60 is proof positive of that fact. The Paint Timing API is yet another addition to the burgeoning Performance API, but instead of capturing page and resource timings, this new and experimental API allows you to capture metrics on when a page begins painting. If you haven’t experimented with any of the various performance APIs, it may help if you brush up a bit on them, as the syntax of this API has much in common with those APIs (particularly the Resource Timing API). That said, you can read on and get something out of this article even if you don’t. Before we dive in, however, let’s talk about painting and the specific timings this API collects. Why do we need an API for measuring paint times? If you’re reading…

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Drupal Developer (PHP/MYSQL) – etouch – Mountain View, CA

Drupal PHP MySQL. Developed in-depth custom modules for Drupal 7, and should be familiar with its ORM, APIs, etc….From etouch – Tue, 08 Aug 2017 08:31:09 GMT – View all Mountain View, CA jobs Source: http://rss.indeed.com/rss?q=Drupal+Developer

Why You Should Consider React Native For Your Next Native App

As a developer who’s created mobile apps using React Native and Swift, I’ve come across pros and cons for each approach, and the advantages of React Native certainly outweigh its disadvantages. I should also emphasize that this article is not meant to convince you to use React Native for every mobile application, and you shouldn’t. React Native is not the de facto solution to building mobile apps. It still has a lot of shortcomings, but given the right use case, it is an effective solution to shipping a cross-platform app without compromising user experience. Cross Platform Business Logic + Native UI The biggest selling point of React Native is the fact that it lets you build native apps using the same technologies that web developers are already using. It lets you render truly native view components using the same declarative React API that we all love. This is not the…

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IntersectionObserver comes to Firefox

A great intro by Dan Callahan on why IntersectionObserver is so damn useful: What do infinite scrolling, lazy loading, and online advertisements all have in common? They need to know about—and react to—the visibility of elements on a page! Unfortunately, knowing whether or not an element is visible has traditionally been difficult on the Web. Most solutions listen for scroll and resize events, then use DOM APIs like getBoundingClientRect() to manually calculate where elements are relative to the viewport. This usually works, but it’s inefficient and doesn’t take into account other ways in which an element’s visibility can change, such as a large image finally loading higher up on the page, which pushes everything else downward. The API is deliciously simple. Direct Link to Article — Permalink IntersectionObserver comes to Firefox is a post from CSS-Tricks Source: CssTricks

A Deep Dive into a Decoupled Drupal 8 Project

How Elevated Third, Hoorooh, and Acquia worked together to create a decoupled site for the Powdr Resorts, one of the largest ski operators in North America Part 1: Setting the Stage: Hosting a Decoupled Drupal site. Powdr Ski Resorts was facing a familiar challenge: the web sites in their network of ski resorts were on a collection of disparate content management systems, which made it difficult to govern their digital properties across multiple brands and sites. Powdr needed a digital solution that provides each brand in the Powdr family the flexibility required to deliver customized web experience for their users. Powdr turned to Elevated Third, Hoorooh Digital, and Acquia to build and design the first in the next generation of sites, a Decoupled Drupal 8 site for Boreal Mountain Resort. Elevated Third spearheaded the decoupled Drupal development; Hoorooh Digital supported the website’s frontend design; Acquia provided the cloud hosting, the…

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Acquia a leader in 2017 Gartner Magic Quadrant for Web Content Management

I’m on vacation this week, and I’ve been trying to disconnect and soak up time with my family. However, I had to make an exception to write a quick but exciting blog post, as Acquia was named a leader in the 2017 Gartner Magic Quadrant for Web Content Management. This marks Acquia’s placement as a leader for the fourth year in a row, solidifying our position as one of the top three vendors in Gartner’s report. Acquia recognized as a top 3 leader, next to Adobe and Sitecore, in the 2017 Gartner Magic Quadrant for Web Content Management.Early in my career I didn’t fully understand or value the role of industry analysts like Gartner. Experience has taught me that strong analyst reports provide credibility and expose vendors to new markets and customers. It’s easy to underestimate the importance of this kind of recognition for Acquia, and by extension for Drupal.…

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Acquia a leader in 2017 Gartner Magic Quadrant for Web Content Management

I’m on vacation this week, and I’ve been trying to disconnect and soak up time with my family. However, I had to make an exception to write a quick but exciting blog post, as Acquia was named a leader in the 2017 Gartner Magic Quadrant for Web Content Management. This marks Acquia’s placement as a leader for the fourth year in a row, solidifying our position as one of the top three vendors in Gartner’s report. Acquia recognized as a top 3 leader, next to Adobe and Sitecore, in the 2017 Gartner Magic Quadrant for Web Content Management.Early in my career I didn’t fully understand or value the role of industry analysts like Gartner. Experience has taught me that strong analyst reports provide credibility and expose vendors to new markets and customers. It’s easy to underestimate the importance of this kind of recognition for Acquia, and by extension for Drupal.…

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Intro to Hoodie and React

Let’s take a look at Hoodie, the “Back-End as a Service” (BaaS) built specifically for front-end developers. I want to explain why I feel like it is a well-designed tool and deserves more exposure among the spectrum of competitors than it gets today. I’ve put together a demo that demonstrates some of the key features of the service, but I feel the need to first set the scene for its use case. Feel free to jump over to the demo repo if you want to get the code. Otherwise, join me for a brief overview. Setting the Scene It is no secret that JavaScript is eating the world these days and with its explosion in popularity, an ever-expanding ecosystem of tooling has arisen. The ease of developing a web app has skyrocketed in recent years thanks to these tools. Developer tools Prettier and ESLint give us freedom to write how…

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(Now More Than Ever) You Might Not Need jQuery

The DOM and native browser API’s have improved by leaps and bounds since jQuery’s release all the way back in 2006. People have been writing “You Might Not Need jQuery” articles since 2013 (see this classic site and this classic repo). I don’t want to rehash old territory, but a good bit has changed in browser land since the last You Might Not Need jQuery article you might have stumbled upon. Browsers continue to implement new APIs that take the pain away from library-free development, many of them directly copied from jQuery. Let’s go through some new vanilla alternatives to jQuery methods. Remove an element from the page Remember the maddeningly roundabout way you had to remove an element from the page with vanilla DOM? el.parentNode.removeChild(el);? Here’s a comparison of the jQuery way and the new improved vanilla way. jQuery: var $elem = $(“.someClass”) //select the element $elem.remove(); //remove the…

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Why Use a Third-Party Form Validation Library?

We’ve just wrapped up a great series of posts from Chris Ferdinandi on modern form validation. It starts here. These days, browsers have quite a few built-in tools for handling form validation including HTML attributes that can do quite a bit on their own, and a JavaScript API that can do even more. Chris even showed us that with a litttttle bit more work we can get down to IE 9 support with ideal UX. So what’s up with third-party form validation libraries? Why would you use a library for something you can get for free? You need deeper browser support. All “modern” browsers + IE 9 down is pretty good, especially when you’ve accounted for cross-browser differences nicely as Chris did. But it’s not inconcievable that you need to go even deeper. Libraries like Parsley go down a smidge further, to IE 8. You’re using a JavaScript framework that…

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Acquia Jumpstarts Data-Driven Personalization with New Starter Kit

We have all heard the buzz around personalization — the key to orchestrating a customer experience that will drive engagement, conversions, and loyalty. Unfortunately, implementing personalization continues to be a challenge for marketers due to an inability to collect data across multiple customer touch points and unify that data across tools into one customer profile. About 80 percent of companies don’t understand their buyers beyond basic demographics and purchase history, and 96 percent of marketers struggle to build a single view of customers, according to VentureBeat. The reality is that personalization throughout the customer journey means nothing without data. It is not possible to deliver the right message at the right time without knowing and understanding the needs and desires of each individual buyer. Even those marketers who invest in technologies to capture customer data are limited by their inability and resource to connect information across all of their various…

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Form Validation Part 1: Constraint Validation in HTML

Most JavaScript form validation libraries are large, and often require other libraries like jQuery. For example, MailChimp’s embeddable form includes a 140kb validation file (minified). It includes the entire jQuery library, a third-party form validation plugin, and some custom MailChimp code. In fact, that setup is what inspired this new series about modern form validation. What new tools do we have these days for form validation? What is possible? What is still needed? In this series, I’m going to show you two lightweight ways to validate forms on the front end. Both take advantage of newer web APIs. I’m also going to teach you how to push browser support for these APIs back to IE9 (which provides you with coverage for 99.6% of all web traffic worldwide). Finally, we’ll take a look at MailChimp’s sign-up form, and provide the same experience with 28× (2,800%) less code. It’s worth mentioning that…

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Server-Side React Rendering

React is best known as a client-side JavaScript framework, but did you know you can (and perhaps should!) render React server-side? Suppose you’ve built a zippy new event listing React app for a client. The app is hooked up to an API built with your favorite server-side tool. A couple weeks later the client tells you that their pages aren’t showing up on Google and don’t look good when posted to Facebook. Seems solvable, right? You figure out that to solve this you’ll need to render your React pages from the server on initial load so that crawlers from search engines and social media sites can read your markup. There is evidence showing that Google sometimes executes javascript and can index the generated content, but not always. So server-side rendering is always recommended if you want to ensure good SEO and compatibility with other services like Facebook, Twitter. In this…

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