Category Archive for: APIs

rfp-robotRFP ROBOT: Website Request for Proposal Generator

The time has come for a new website (or website redesign), which means you need to write a website request for proposal or web RFP. A Google search produces a few examples, but they vary wildly and don’t seem to speak really to your goals for developing or redesigning a new website. You need to write a website RFP that will clearly articulate your needs and generate responses from the best website designers and developers out there. But how?

Have no fear, RFP Robot is here. He will walk you through a step-by-step process to help you work through the details of your project and create a PDF formatted website design RFP that will provide the information vendors need to write an accurate bid. RFP Robot will tell you what info you should include, point out pitfalls, and give examples.


What are Durable Functions?

Oh no! Not more jargon! What exactly does the term Durable Functions mean? Durable functions have to do with Serverless architectures. It’s an extension of Azure Functions that allow you to write stateful executions in a serverless environment. Think of it this way. There are a few big benefits that people tend to focus on when they talk about Serverless Functions: They’re cheap They scale with your needs (not necessarily, but that’s the default for many services) They allow you to write event-driven code Let’s talk about that last one for a minute. When you can write event-driven code, you can break your operational needs down into smaller functions that essentially say: when this request comes in, run this code. You don’t mess around with infrastructure, that’s taken care of for you. It’s a pretty compelling concept. In this paradigm, you can break your workflow down into smaller, reusable pieces…

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The industry’s best open API

(This is a sponsored post.)With our robust SDK, super clean dashboard, detailed documentation, and world-class support, HelloSign API is one of the most flexible and powerful APIs on the market. Start building for free today. Direct Link to Article — PermalinkThe post The industry’s best open API appeared first on CSS-Tricks. Source: CssTricks

Experience Express in Darmstadt: Celebrating Drupal 8's Most Important Release Yet

Though there was no DrupalCon Europe this year, the European Drupal community stepped up and organized their own conference, Drupal Europe, in Darmstadt, Germany last month. An incredibly successful gathering held in the Darmstadtium venue, a beautiful convention center in the center of this college town, Drupal Europe demonstrated the unique power that grassroots initiatives can have in our open-source community. Drupal Europe came at a particularly important time in the Drupal community as we welcomed the latest and most important release in Drupal 8’s history, with exciting new features such as embedded media support (such as YouTube videos), support for file uploads via REST, and substantial improvements in many other areas. At the same time, as Dries Buytaert said during his keynote, it is now time for the community to begin considering how Drupal 9, which will be released in 2020, will look. Because it was an intensely busy…

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Using Drupal 8 and AWS IoT to Power Digital Signage for New York’s Subway System

Intro: About Digital Experiences and Signs (Special thanks to Gerardo Gonzalez and Andy Hawks, engineers at CivicActions, who worked on this project — and this post — with me.) “Digital Experiences” are the next big thing someone at your company is almost certainly talking about. These include visionary technology that operates based on rich data that is timely and location-based, interactions between other services and products, and perhaps most importantly: content that is not reliant on a user manually driving the experience (as they usually might on a website or mobile application). One common form factor for these experiences is the digital sign. Not all signs constitute a digital experience, but there is an emerging market for such devices and the management of the content / data that is flowing to them. This challenge is particularly exciting when considering the potential for massive scale, as digital signage is installed across…

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Removing jQuery from GitHub.com frontend

Here’s how and why the team at GitHub has slowly been deprecating jQuery from their codebase: We have recently completed a milestone where we were able to drop jQuery as a dependency of the frontend code for GitHub.com. This marks the end of a gradual, years-long transition of increasingly decoupling from jQuery until we were able to completely remove the library. In this post, we will explain a bit of history of how we started depending on jQuery in the first place, how we realized when it was no longer needed, and point out that—instead of replacing it with another library or framework—we were able to achieve everything that we needed using standard browser APIs. The team explores how using tools like eslint-plugin-jquery discourages developers at GitHub from using jQuery, but the team also notes that they decided to remove certain design behaviors altogether to help them achieve this goal:…

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Drupal 7, 8 and 9

We just released Drupal 8.6.0. With six minor releases behind us, it is time to talk about the long-term future of Drupal 8 (and therefore Drupal 7 and Drupal 9). I’ve written about when to release Drupal 9 in the past, but this time, I’m ready to provide further details. The plan outlined in this blog has been discussed with the Drupal 7 Core Committers, the Drupal 8 Core Committers and the Drupal Security Team. While we feel good about this plan, we can’t plan for every eventuality and we may continue to make adjustments. Drupal 8 will be end-of-life by November 2021 Drupal 8’s innovation model depends on introducing new functionality in minor versions while maintaining backwards compatibility. This approach is working so well that some people have suggested we institute minor releases forever, and never release Drupal 9 at all. However that approach is not feasible. We need…

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Interactive Introduction to CSS Houdini

This is a great explanatory microsite by Sam Richard. CSS Houdini will let authors tap in to the actual CSS engine, finally allowing us to extend CSS, and do so at CSS speeds. Much like Service Workers are a low-level JavaScript API for the browser’s cache, Houdini introduces low-level JavaScript APIs for the browser’s render engines. What’s important to know is that Houdini is broken up into these different parts, each of which will be implemented separately. We have an intro to the paint API here and a number of other articles that touch on it. Here’s a very cool collection Dan Wilson put together of Houdini + Custom Properties. Direct Link to Article — PermalinkThe post Interactive Introduction to CSS Houdini appeared first on CSS-Tricks. Source: CssTricks

JAMstack_conf

I love a good conference that exists because there is a rising tide in technology. JAMstack_conf: Static site generators, serverless architectures, and powerful APIs are giving front-end teams fullstack capabilities — without the pain of owning infrastructure. It’s a new approach called the JAMstack. I’ll be speaking at it! I’ve been pretty interested in all this and trying to learn and document as much as I can. Direct Link to Article — PermalinkThe post JAMstack_conf appeared first on CSS-Tricks. Source: CssTricks

The Ecological Impact of Browser Diversity

Early in my career when I worked at agencies and later at Microsoft on Edge, I heard the same lament over and over: “Argh, why doesn’t Edge just run on Blink? Then I would have access to ALL THE APIs I want to use and would only have to test in one browser!” Let me be clear: an Internet that runs only on Chrome’s engine, Blink, and its offspring, is not the paradise we like to imagine it to be. As a Google Developer Expert who has worked on Microsoft Edge, with Firefox, and with the W3C as an Invited Expert, I have some opinions (and a number of facts) to drop on this topic. Let’s get to it. What is a browser, even? Let’s clear up some terminology. Popular browsers you know today include Google Chrome, Apple Safari, Mozilla Firefox, and Microsoft Edge, but in the past we’ve also…

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Using feature detection to write CSS with cross-browser support

In early 2017, I presented a couple of workshops on the topic of CSS feature detection, titled CSS Feature Detection in 2017. A friend of mine, Justin Slack from New Media Labs, recently sent me a link to the phenomenal Feature Query Manager extension (available for both Chrome and Firefox), by Nigerian developer Ire Aderinokun. This seemed to be a perfect addition to my workshop material on the subject. However, upon returning to the material, I realized how much my work on the subject has aged in the last 18 months. The CSS landscape has undergone some tectonic shifts: The Atomic CSS approach, although widely hated at first, has gained some traction through libraries like Tailwind, and perhaps influenced the addition of several new utility classes to Bootstrap 4. CSS-in-JS exploded in popularity, with Styled Components at the forefront of the movement. The CSS Grid Layout spec has been adopted…

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Frontend Developer – Uxiliary – Spokane, WA

Ability to integrate with back-end developers, APIs, dynamic content and templating. Uxiliary is searching for a full-time Frontend Developer to join our team….From Indeed – Mon, 20 Aug 2018 21:56:56 GMT – View all Spokane, WA jobs Source: http://rss.indeed.com/rss?q=Drupal+Developer

What I learned by building my own VS Code extension

VS Code is slowly closing the gap between a text editor and an integrated development environment (IDE). At the core of this extremely versatile and flexible tool lies a wonderful API that provides an extensible plugin model that is relatively easy for JavaScript developers to build on. With my first extension, VS Code All Autocomplete, reaching 25K downloads, I wanted to share what I learned from the development and maintenance of it with all of you. Trivia! Visual Studio Code does not share any lineage with the Visual Studio IDE. Microsoft used the VS brand for their enterprise audience which has led to a lot of confusion. The application is just Code in the command line and does not work at all like Visual Studio. It takes more inspiration from TextMate and Sublime Text than Visual Studio. It shares the snippet format of TextMate (Mac only) and forgoes the XML…

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Twitter Kills Off Third-Party App Features by @MattGSouthern

Twitter has restricted access to APIs, which effectively kills off certain key features in popular third-party apps.The post Twitter Kills Off Third-Party App Features by @MattGSouthern appeared first on Search Engine Journal. Source: https://www.searchenginejournal.com/feed/

Five interesting ways to use Sanity.io for image art direction

When we saw Chris put up a list of cloud-hosted data-stores, we couldn’t resist letting him know that we also had one of those, only ours is a fully featured CMS that come with a rich query language and an open source, real time, collaborative authoring tool that you can tailor to your specific needs using React. It’s called Sanity.io. “Add us to your list!” we asked Chris. “No, your stuff is interesting, can’t you write about you,” he replied. “Maybe something that would be useful for people working with images.” Challenge accepted! Systems like Sanity wants to free your content from the specific page it happens to be sitting on, so that you can flow it through APIs. That way you can reuse your painstakingly crafted content anywhere you need it. So, what does this mean for images? Images are the odd ones out. We can capture documentation articles,…

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Let’s make a form that puts current location to use in a map!

I love shopping online. I can find what I need and get most things for a decent price. I am Nigerian currently working and studying in India, and two things I dread when shopping online are: Filling out a credit card form Filling out shipping and billing address forms Maybe I’m just lazy, but these things are not without challenges! For the first one, thanks to payment processing services like PayPal and e-wallets, I neither have to type in my 12-digit credit card number for every new e-commerce site I visit, nor have to save my credit card details with them. For the second, the only time-saving option given by most shopping websites is to save your shipping address, but you still have to fill the form (arrghh!). This is where the challenge is. I’ve had most of my orders returned because my address (which I thought was the right…

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Using data in React with the Fetch API and axios

If you are new to React, and perhaps have only played with building to-do and counter apps, you may not yet have run across a need to pull in data for your app. There will likely come a time when you’ll need to do this, as React apps are most well suited for situations where you’re handling both data and state. The first set of data you may need to handle might be hard-coded into your React application, like we did for this demo from our Error Boundary tutorial: See the Pen error boundary 0 by Kingsley Silas Chijioke (@kinsomicrote) on CodePen. What if you want to handle data from an API? That’s the purpose of this tutorial. Specifically, we’ll make use of the Fetch API and axios as examples for how to request and use data. The Fetch API The Fetch API provides an interface for fetching resources. We’ll…

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Acquia a leader in 2018 Gartner Magic Quadrant for Web Content Management

Today, Acquia was named a leader in the 2018 Gartner Magic Quadrant for Web Content Management. Acquia has now been recognized as a leader for five years in a row. Acquia recognized as a leader, next to Adobe and Sitecore, in the 2018 Gartner Magic Quadrant for Web Content Management.Analyst reports like the Gartner Magic Quadrant are important because they introduce organizations to Acquia and Drupal. Last year, I explained it in the following way: “If you want to find a good coffee place, you use Yelp. If you want to find a nice hotel in New York, you use TripAdvisor. Similarly, if a CIO or CMO wants to spend $250,000 or more on enterprise software, they often consult an analyst firm like Gartner.”. Our tenure as a top vendor is not only a strong endorsement of Acquia’s strategy and vision, but also underscores our consistency. Drupal and Acquia are…

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Build a state management system with vanilla JavaScript

Managing state is not a new thing in software, but it’s still relatively new for building software in JavaScript. Traditionally, we’d keep state within the DOM itself or even assign it to a global object in the window. Now though, we’re spoiled with choices for libraries and frameworks to help us with this. Libraries like Redux, MobX and Vuex make managing cross-component state almost trivial. This is great for an application’s resilience and it works really well with a state-first, reactive framework such as React or Vue. How do these libraries work though? What would it take to write one ourselves? Turns out, it’s pretty straightforward and there’s an opportunity to learn some really common patterns and also learn about some useful modern APIs that are available to us. Before we get started, it’s recommended that you have an intermediary knowledge of JavaScript. You should know about data types and…

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Finite State Machines with React

As JavaScript applications on the web have grown more complex, so too has the complexity of dealing with state in those applications — state being the aggregate of all the data that an application needs to perform its function. Over the last several years, there has been a ton of great innovation in the realm of state management through tools like Redux, MobX, and Vuex. Something that hasn’t gotten quite as much attention, though, is state design. What in the heck do I mean by state design? Let’s set the scene a little bit. In the past, when building an application that needs to fetch some data from a backend service and display it to the user, I’ve designed my state to use boolean flags for various things like isLoading, isSuccess, isError, and so on down the line. As this number of boolean flags grows, though, the number of possible…

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