Category Archive for: APIs

rfp-robotRFP ROBOT: Website Request for Proposal Generator

The time has come for a new website (or website redesign), which means you need to write a website request for proposal or web RFP. A Google search produces a few examples, but they vary wildly and don’t seem to speak really to your goals for developing or redesigning a new website. You need to write a website RFP that will clearly articulate your needs and generate responses from the best website designers and developers out there. But how?

Have no fear, RFP Robot is here. He will walk you through a step-by-step process to help you work through the details of your project and create a PDF formatted website design RFP that will provide the information vendors need to write an accurate bid. RFP Robot will tell you what info you should include, point out pitfalls, and give examples.


Prettier + Stylelint: Writing Very Clean CSS (Or, Keeping Clean Code is a Two-Tool Game)

It sure is nice having a whole codebase that is perfectly compliant to a set of code style guidelines. All the files use the same indentation, the same quote style, the same spacing and line-break rules, heck, tiny things like the way zero’s in values are handled and how keyframes are named. It seems like a tall order, but these days, it’s easier than ever. It seems to me it’s become a two-tool game: A tool to automatically fix easy-to-fix problems A tool to warn about harder-to-fix problems Half the battle: Prettier Otherwise known as “fix things for me, please”. Best I can tell, Prettier is a fairly new project, only busting onto the scene in January 2017. Now in the last quarter of 2017, it seems like everybody and their sister is using it. They call it an Opinionated Code Formatter. The big idea: upon save of a document,…

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REST versus GraphQL

I think the jury is in: GraphQL is a winner for developers consuming APIs. We format a request for the exact data we want, and the endpoint coughs it up. What might have been multiple API requests and manually stitching together data, is now one in just the format we want. I’ve heard less about whether GraphQL is ideal for the providers of those APIs. I imagine it’s far easier to cache the results at specific URL’s with a REST structure, as opposed to a single URL in charge of any request. But I’m no server guru. This tool is pretty fascinating in that is allows you to build your own little GraphQL backend and then run queries against it and see the results. Direct Link to Article — Permalink REST versus GraphQL is a post from CSS-Tricks Source: CssTricks

Drupal looking to adopt React

Last week at DrupalCon Vienna, I proposed adding a modern JavaScript framework to Drupal core. After the keynote, I met with core committers, framework managers, JavaScript subsystem maintainers, and JavaScript experts in the Drupal community to discuss next steps. In this blog post, I look back on how things have evolved, since the last time we explored adding a new JavaScript framework to Drupal core two years ago, and what we believe are the next steps after DrupalCon Vienna. As a group, we agreed that we had learned a lot from watching the JavaScript community grow and change since our initial exploration. We agreed that today, React would be the most promising option given its expansive adoption by developers, its unopinionated and component-based nature, and its well-suitedness to building new Drupal interfaces in an incremental way. Today, I’m formally proposing that the Drupal community adopt React, after discussion and experimentation…

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​HelloSign API: The dev friendly esign

(This is a sponsored post.)We know that no API can write your code for you (unfortunately), but ours comes close. With in-depth documentation, customizable features, and dashboard that makes your code easy to debug, you won’t find an eSignature product with an easier path to implementation. 2x faster than other esignature APIs. “We wanted an API built by a team that valued user experience as much as we do. At the end of the day, we chose HelloSign because it was the best combination of these features, price and user experience.”  - Max Mullen Co-Founder of Instacart Test drive HelloSign API for free today. Direct Link to Article — Permalink ​HelloSign API: The dev friendly esign is a post from CSS-Tricks Source: CssTricks

Foxhound

As of WordPress 4.7 (December 2016), WordPress has shipped with a JSON API built right in. Wanna see? Hit up this URL right here on CSS-Tricks. There is loads of docs for it. That JSON API can be used for all sorts of things. I think APIs are often thought about in terms of using externally, like making the data available to some other website. But it’s equally interesting to think about digesting that API right on the site itself. That’s how so many websites are built these days away, with “Moden JavaScript” and all. So it’s possible to build a WordPress theme that uses it’s own API for all the data, making an entirely client-rendered site. I would have thought there would be a bunch of themes like this available, but it seems it’s still new enough of a concept there isn’t that many. That I found, anyway. I…

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Creating a Static API from a Repository

When I first started building websites, the proposition was quite basic: take content, which may or may not be stored in some form of database, and deliver it to people’s browsers as HTML pages. Over the years, countless products used that simple model to offer all-in-one solutions for content management and delivery on the web. Fast-forward a decade or so and developers are presented with a very different reality. With such a vast landscape of devices consuming digital content, it’s now imperative to consider how content can be delivered not only to web browsers, but also to native mobile applications, IoT devices, and other mediums yet to come. Even within the realms of the web browser, things have also changed: client-side applications are becoming more and more ubiquitous, with challenges to content delivery that didn’t exist in traditional server-rendered pages. The answer to these challenges almost invariably involves creating an…

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Announcing Node.js on Acquia Cloud

Today, Acquia announced that it expanded Acquia Cloud to support Node.js, the popular open-source JavaScript runtime. This is a big milestone for Acquia as it is the first time we have extended our cloud beyond Drupal. I wanted to take some time to explain the evolution of Acquia’s open-source stack and why this shift is important for our customers’ success. From client-side JavaScript to server-side JavaScript JavaScript was created at Netscape in 1995, when Brendan Eich wrote the first version of JavaScript in just 10 days. It took around 10 years for JavaScript to reach enterprise maturity, however. Adoption accelerated in 2004 when Google used JavaScript to build the first release of Gmail. In comparison to e-mail competitors like Yahoo! Mail and Hotmail, Gmail showed what was possible with client-side JavaScript, which enables developers to update pages dynamically and reduces full-page refreshes and round trips to the server. The benefit…

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A Rube Goldberg Machine

Ada Rose Edwards takes a look at some of the newer browser APIs and how they fit together: These new APIs are powerful individually but also they complement each other beautifully, CSS custom properties being the common thread which goes through them all as it is a low level change to CSS. The post itself is a showcase to them. Speaking of new browser APIs, that was a whole subject on ShopTalk a few weeks back. Direct Link to Article — Permalink A Rube Goldberg Machine is a post from CSS-Tricks Source: CssTricks

Cloud Storage as a CDN Option

Inspired Magazine Inspired Magazine – creativity & inspiration daily If you have a slow site, probably on shared server that receives a lot of traffic, you may be able to speed things up a bit by hosting some of your content on a Content Delivery Network (CDN). Unfortunately traditional CDN is often priced out of reach for a small business website, but the good news is there is a way to set up cloud storage drives to act as your own personal CDN systems. In this article we’ll discover some methods for doing that. Cloud storage CDN emulation vs pure CDN The main difference is cost and volume. Pure CDN usually works out cheaper for high traffic volumes and more expensive for low traffic volumes. Because a typical small business isn’t likely to see the kind of traffic that would make pure CDN worth it, emulating CDN functionality with cloud…

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An Introduction to Node.js

Decoupled applications are increasing in popularity as brand experiences continue to move beyond the traditional website. Although your content management system (CMS) might house your content alongside Drupal, it doesn’t just stay put. APIs are making calls to extend that content to things like digital signage, kiosks, mobile … really, the sky’s the limit (as long as there’s an API). Decoupled applications are nothing new; Acquia CTO and Founder Dries Buytaert has been writing about this for at least two years. And we’ve been working with clients, such as Princess Cruises and Powdr, to build decoupled experiences and applications for their customers. Why is decoupled Drupal becoming so popular? We see a number of benefits both from our customers’ perspective as well as from our partners. The primary use case for decoupled relates to when our customers need a single source of truth for content that supports multiple applications. Drupal’s…

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Reservoir: a Simple Way to Decouple Drupal

Cross-posted from Dries’ blog Decoupled Drupal seems to be taking the world by storm. I’m currently in Sydney, and everyone I talked to so far, including the attendees at the Sydney Drupal User Group, is looking into decoupled Drupal. Digital agencies are experimenting with it on more projects, and there is even a new Decoupled Dev Days conference dedicated to the topic. Roughly eight months ago, we asked ourselves in Acquia’s Office of the CTO whether we could create a “headless” version of Drupal, optimized for integration with a variety of applications, channels and touchpoints. Such a version could help us build bridges with other developer communities working with different frameworks and programming languages, and the JavaScript community in particular. I’ve been too busy with the transition at Acquia to blog about it in real time, but a few months ago, we released Reservoir. It’s a Drupal-based content repository with…

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Form Validation with Web Audio

I’ve been thinking about sound on websites for a while now. When we talk about using sound on websites, most of us grimace and think of the old days, when blaring background music played when the website loaded. Today this isn’t and needn’t be a thing. We can get clever with sound. We have the Web Audio API now and it gives us a great deal of control over how we design sound to be used within our web applications. In this article, we’ll experiment with just one simple example: a form. What if when you were filling out a form it gave you auditory feedback as well as visual feedback. I can see your grimacing faces! But give me a moment. We already have a lot of auditory feedback within the digital products we use. The keyboard on a phone produces a tapping sound. Even if you have “message…

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Decoupled Drupal: POWDR’s Front End Architecture Build

This is the last installment in the decoupled Drupal project we’ve working on with Elevated Third and Hoorooh Digital. The project we’re documenting was one we worked on for Powdr Resorts, one of the largest ski operators in North America. The first installment in the series was A Deep Dive into a Decoupled Drupal 8 Project. Part two offered a radical change of altitude, from Andy Mead, Drupal Developer at Elevated Third: Decoupled Drupal: A 10,000-foot View. Part 3 was on Decoupled Drupal Technologies and Techniques In this final installment in the series, Denny Cunningham, Lead Front End Developer at Hoorooh Digital at Hoorooh Digital, discusses the three main areas that needed to be addressed during the build of POWDR’s front end architecture: Routing & Syncing with the API, Component Driven Content, and the Build Process & Tools. Introduction For a front end developer, there’s no shortage of tools available.…

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Reservoir, a simple way to decouple Drupal

Decoupled Drupal seems to be taking the world by storm. I’m currently in Sydney, and everyone I talked to so far, including the attendees at the Sydney Drupal User Group, is looking into decoupled Drupal. Digital agencies are experimenting with it on more projects, and there is even a new Decoupled Dev Days conference dedicated to the topic. Roughly eight months ago, we asked ourselves in Acquia’s Office of the CTO whether we could create a “headless” version of Drupal, optimized for integration with a variety of applications, channels and touchpoints. Such a version could help us build bridges with other developer communities working with different frameworks and programming languages, and the JavaScript community in particular. I’ve been too busy with the transition at Acquia to blog about it in real time, but a few months ago, we released Reservoir. It’s a Drupal-based content repository with all the necessary web…

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Using the Paint Timing API

It’s a great time to be a web performance aficionado, and the arrival of the Paint Timing API in Chrome 60 is proof positive of that fact. The Paint Timing API is yet another addition to the burgeoning Performance API, but instead of capturing page and resource timings, this new and experimental API allows you to capture metrics on when a page begins painting. If you haven’t experimented with any of the various performance APIs, it may help if you brush up a bit on them, as the syntax of this API has much in common with those APIs (particularly the Resource Timing API). That said, you can read on and get something out of this article even if you don’t. Before we dive in, however, let’s talk about painting and the specific timings this API collects. Why do we need an API for measuring paint times? If you’re reading…

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Drupal Developer (PHP/MYSQL) – etouch – Mountain View, CA

Drupal PHP MySQL. Developed in-depth custom modules for Drupal 7, and should be familiar with its ORM, APIs, etc….From etouch – Tue, 08 Aug 2017 08:31:09 GMT – View all Mountain View, CA jobs Source: http://rss.indeed.com/rss?q=Drupal+Developer

Why You Should Consider React Native For Your Next Native App

As a developer who’s created mobile apps using React Native and Swift, I’ve come across pros and cons for each approach, and the advantages of React Native certainly outweigh its disadvantages. I should also emphasize that this article is not meant to convince you to use React Native for every mobile application, and you shouldn’t. React Native is not the de facto solution to building mobile apps. It still has a lot of shortcomings, but given the right use case, it is an effective solution to shipping a cross-platform app without compromising user experience. Cross Platform Business Logic + Native UI The biggest selling point of React Native is the fact that it lets you build native apps using the same technologies that web developers are already using. It lets you render truly native view components using the same declarative React API that we all love. This is not the…

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IntersectionObserver comes to Firefox

A great intro by Dan Callahan on why IntersectionObserver is so damn useful: What do infinite scrolling, lazy loading, and online advertisements all have in common? They need to know about—and react to—the visibility of elements on a page! Unfortunately, knowing whether or not an element is visible has traditionally been difficult on the Web. Most solutions listen for scroll and resize events, then use DOM APIs like getBoundingClientRect() to manually calculate where elements are relative to the viewport. This usually works, but it’s inefficient and doesn’t take into account other ways in which an element’s visibility can change, such as a large image finally loading higher up on the page, which pushes everything else downward. The API is deliciously simple. Direct Link to Article — Permalink IntersectionObserver comes to Firefox is a post from CSS-Tricks Source: CssTricks

A Deep Dive into a Decoupled Drupal 8 Project

How Elevated Third, Hoorooh, and Acquia worked together to create a decoupled site for the Powdr Resorts, one of the largest ski operators in North America Part 1: Setting the Stage: Hosting a Decoupled Drupal site. Powdr Ski Resorts was facing a familiar challenge: the web sites in their network of ski resorts were on a collection of disparate content management systems, which made it difficult to govern their digital properties across multiple brands and sites. Powdr needed a digital solution that provides each brand in the Powdr family the flexibility required to deliver customized web experience for their users. Powdr turned to Elevated Third, Hoorooh Digital, and Acquia to build and design the first in the next generation of sites, a Decoupled Drupal 8 site for Boreal Mountain Resort. Elevated Third spearheaded the decoupled Drupal development; Hoorooh Digital supported the website’s frontend design; Acquia provided the cloud hosting, the…

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