Category Archive for: android

rfp-robotRFP ROBOT: Website Request for Proposal Generator

The time has come for a new website (or website redesign), which means you need to write a website request for proposal or web RFP. A Google search produces a few examples, but they vary wildly and don’t seem to speak really to your goals for developing or redesigning a new website. You need to write a website RFP that will clearly articulate your needs and generate responses from the best website designers and developers out there. But how?

Have no fear, RFP Robot is here. He will walk you through a step-by-step process to help you work through the details of your project and create a PDF formatted website design RFP that will provide the information vendors need to write an accurate bid. RFP Robot will tell you what info you should include, point out pitfalls, and give examples.


Flutter: Google’s take on cross platform

Flutter is a mobile SDK that, at its core, is about empowering everyone to build beautiful mobile apps. Whether you come from the world of web development or native mobile development, Flutter makes it easier to create mobile apps in a familiar, simplified way, without ever giving up control to the framework. As of this writing, Google AdWords and Alibaba are both using Flutter in production. You can see more examples of who’s using Flutter (including the app I’ve worked on) on Flutter’s website on the showcase page. Right now, there’s a lot of buzz about Flutter. The question I see most often is, “Flutter or React Native…which one should I use?” Like all things in programming, its all about the tradeoffs you’re willing to make. I’m going to try to convince you that Flutter is the best option for mobile app development. I believe it’s better than any other…

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Google Search on Android Loads Repeated Searches Twice as Fast by @MattGSouthern

Google’s search results on Android now use a web browser technology called Service Worker to cache repeated searches.The post Google Search on Android Loads Repeated Searches Twice as Fast by @MattGSouthern appeared first on Search Engine Journal. Source: https://www.searchenginejournal.com/feed/

The Ecological Impact of Browser Diversity

Early in my career when I worked at agencies and later at Microsoft on Edge, I heard the same lament over and over: “Argh, why doesn’t Edge just run on Blink? Then I would have access to ALL THE APIs I want to use and would only have to test in one browser!” Let me be clear: an Internet that runs only on Chrome’s engine, Blink, and its offspring, is not the paradise we like to imagine it to be. As a Google Developer Expert who has worked on Microsoft Edge, with Firefox, and with the W3C as an Invited Expert, I have some opinions (and a number of facts) to drop on this topic. Let’s get to it. What is a browser, even? Let’s clear up some terminology. Popular browsers you know today include Google Chrome, Apple Safari, Mozilla Firefox, and Microsoft Edge, but in the past we’ve also…

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Top Free and Affordable Project Management Tools for Copywriters

Most copywriters don’t have the luxury of working on just one project at a time, so they have to be able to juggle multiple assignments at the same time. This is difficult for even the most seasoned writers, but a project management tool can make a huge difference in a copywriter’s organization, time management, and content output. Benefits of project management for copywriters In the shortest of terms, project management software is a tool that streamlines the planning, initiation, execution, completion, and review of all your various tasks and projects. Whereas you’d normally have to keep things like deadlines, client notes, ideas, pitches, and other copywriting mainstays in straight on your own, a project management tool effectively consolidates those processes and data into a single platform. Needless to say, a copywriter has much to grain from selecting a project management tool. But with so many options available, how do you choose…

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New in Basecamp: Recurring Events

Now you can add [daily, weekly, monthly, yearly] repeating events to the Basecamp schedule. Here’s how it works:When you add an event in Basecamp 3……you’ll see a new option to repeat the event……the options include every day, every week day, once a week, once a month, and once a year……you can choose to repeat the event forever, or until a certain date……the repeat frequency is shown on the event page as well…This feature has been a long time coming. Thanks to everyone who sent in a request, to Merissa on the support team for championing the push to make this happen, and to Jeff, Conor, Pratik, and everyone else who pitched in to help make it all work. The new feature is live for all Basecamp 3 customers on all platforms (Web, Mac Desktop, Windows Desktop, iOS iPhone + iPad, and Android). We hope you find it useful.New in Basecamp: Recurring Events was originally published in Signal…

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Practical CSS Scroll Snapping

CSS scroll snapping allows you to lock the viewport to certain elements or locations after a user has finished scrolling. It’s great for building interactions like this one: Live Demo Browser support and basic usage Browser support for CSS scroll snapping has improved significantly since it was introduced in 2016, with Google Chrome (69+), Firefox, Edge, and Safari all supporting some version of it. This browser support data is from Caniuse, which has more detail. A number indicates that browser supports the feature at that version and up.DesktopChromeOperaFirefoxIEEdgeSafari69No6311*18*11Mobile / TabletiOS SafariOpera MobileOpera MiniAndroidAndroid ChromeAndroid Firefox11.0-11.2NoNoNoNo60 Scroll snapping is used by setting the scroll-snap-type property on a container element and the scroll-snap-align property on elements inside it. When the container element is scrolled, it will snap to the child elements you’ve defined. In its most basic form, it looks like this: <div class=’container’> <section class=’child’></section> <section class=’child’></section> <section class=’child’></section> … </div>…

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The possibilities of the color-adjust property

The Open Web continues to show up in places we would have never originally expected to find it: our phones, televisions, watches, books, video game consoles, fast food menus, gas pumps, elevators, cars—even our refrigerators. By not making too many or too strict assumptions about how the web should be used, it remains flexible and adaptable. These qualities have allowed it to outperform closed technologies like Flash and Silverlight. With the web’s growth comes new features to better accommodate its new form factors and use cases. One feature I’m excited about is the color-adjust property, proposed in CSS Color Module Level 4. It is an acknowledgement that the web will continue to show up on devices that have less-than-stellar displays. There are two values for color-adjust: economy and exact. A value of exact tells the browser it shouldn’t make adjustments to the colors declared in the stylesheet: .card { background-color:…

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Nintendo Switch Does Multiple Accounts Right

Multiple Accounts in a product is a difficult to design for. It’s not a typical thing, though. Most have just one Google, Apple, Instagram account. However, some might want to share an iPad or HomePod with family. Since those don’t support multiple accounts, the owner’s profile ends up overrun by someone else’s preferences. It’s an edge case that’s difficult to design.Basecamp 3, the product for which I design the Android app for, does support multiple accounts. You can flip between your Personal Basecamp, Work Basecamp, and other Basecamps you’re part of. The design keeps each Basecamp’s data and preferences separate.A few months ago our family got a Nintendo Switch. I didn’t think too much about how easy it is to share. The system is so intuitive that you actually don’t have to think about it too much. It wasn’t until today that I really looked at how simple and elegant the…

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The trick to viewport units on mobile

Viewport units have always been controversial and some of that is because of how mobile browsers have made things more complicated by having their own opinions about how to implement them. Case in point: should the scrollbar be taken into account for the vw unit? What about a site’s navigation or page controls — should those count in the calculation? Then there are physical attributes of the devices themselves (hello, notch!) that can’t be overlooked. First, a little context The spec is pretty vague about how viewport units should be calculated. With mobile devices, we’re often concerned with the vertical height, so let’s look specifically at viewport height (vh): vh unit Equal to 1% of the height of the initial containing block. So yeah, no clear guidance there when it comes to handling device and browser-specific differentiations. vh was initially calculated by the current viewport of your browser. If you…

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Avis Kaspersky 2018 : Test complet réalisé par la rédaction

Le secteur de la protection sur internet ne s’est jamais aussi bien porté ces dernières années. Il faut dire que les scandales récents sont nombreux et beaucoup d’utilisateurs se sont inquiétés à raison. Pour être certains de disposer de la meilleure protection sur internet, il vous faut un antivirus. C’est le moyen le plus complet pour vous permettre d’accéder à une sécurité sans faille sur le web. Dans notre avis du jour, nous allons juger le fournisseur d’antivirus Kaspersky, un des antivirus les plus connus du marché qui dispose déjà d’une bonne aura sur le marché. Voyons ce qu’il en est réellement. Résumé de notre avis Kaspersky[wpsm_toplist h1] Souscrire à l’offre Kaspersky > Introduction et tarification Comme à notre habitude, nous allons débuter cet avis Kaspersky par une courte présentation de ce fournisseur d’antivirus déjà très connu sur le marché. Il faut dire que l’entreprise russe a déjà un bon…

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Are These Browsers Going to the Moon?

Chrome, Safari, Firefox, Edge, and (unfortunately) Internet Explorer are the most popular browsers today, and they are great. They have awesome features, sweet add-ons, and most people never give them a second thought. This post is not about those browsers, it’s about the other browsers. Browsers that can help users stay anonymous and protect their identity. Browsers that can eliminate ads and support publishers and content creators through cryptocurrency micropayments. Browsers using new protocols that promise a truly decentralized internet. Browsers that double as cryptocurrency wallets and connect users to what the, perhaps too optimistic call “web 3.0.” Coming up are four browsers that may change the way we think about the internet. Brave Browser: The micropayments experiment The Brave Browser (for Desktop) has a bunch of cool features. Brave is a micropayments platform using their own ERC20 token (BATs), it is an ad blocker, and it allows users to…

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Quel est le meilleur VPN gratuit pour les appareils Android ?

Si vous naviguez sur internet avec votre smartphone ou votre tablette, vous savez sûrement que vous êtes traqués constamment par les sites internet que vous visitez. Ces derniers, grâce à votre adresse IP, vous localisent et savent qui vous êtes. Si les récents scandales sur l’utilisation des données personnelles des utilisateurs vous ont interpellé, le VPN est un bon moyen pour naviguer anonymement sur la toile. Dans cet article, nous allons décrire ce que peut vous apporter un VPN pour votre appareil Android, les critères à regarder pour choisir votre fournisseur de VPN gratuit et nous vous dirons enfin quels sont les trois fournisseurs qui peuvent prétendre à être le meilleur VPN gratuit sur Android. Résumé de notre article[wpsm_toplist h1] Souscrire à l’offre Sync > Afin d’éclaircir ce qu’on entend par le meilleur VPN gratuit pour Android, nous allons commencer par rappeler les fonctions et l’utilité d’un Virtual Private Network…

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Anatomy of a malicious script: how a website can take over your browser

By now, we all know that the major tech behemoths like Facebook or Google know everything about our lives, including how often we go to the bathroom (hence all the prostate medication ads that keep popping up, even on reputable news sites). After all, we’ve given them permission to do so, by reading pages and pages of legalese in their T&C pages (we all did, didn’t we?) and clicking on the “Accept” button. But what can a site do to you, or to your device, without your explicit consent? What happens when you visit a slightly “improper” site, or a “proper” site you visited includes some third-party script that hasn’t been thoroughly checked? Has it ever happened to you that your browser gets hijacked and innumerable pop-ups come up, and you seem to be unable to close them without quitting the browser altogether, or clicking 25 times on the “Back”…

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Hyperlinking Beyond the Web

Hyperlinks are the oldest and the most popular feature of the web. The word hypertext (which is the ht in http/s) means text having hyperlinks. The ability to link to other people’s hypertext made the web, a web — a set of connected pages. This fundamental feature has made the web a very powerful platform and it is obvious that the world of apps needs this feature. All modern platforms support a way for apps to register a URI (custom protocol) and also have universal links (handling web links in an app). Let’s see why we’d want to take advantage of this feature and how to do it. Why have app links at all? Creating URIs that apps can open provides a unique set of benefits. A URL encapsulates the entire state of the webpage (it used to before the advent of Single Page Applications (SPAs) heavy with JavaScript and…

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Delivering WordPress in 7KB

Over the past six months, I’ve become increasingly interested in the topic of web sustainability. The carbon footprint of the Internet was not something I used to give much thought to, which is surprising considering my interest in environmental issues and the fact that my profession is web-based. The web in a warming world As a brief recap, I attended MozFest in London last year. In between sessions, I was scanning a noticeboard to see what was coming up, and I spotted a session entitled, “Building a Planet-Friendly Web.” I felt a little dumbstruck. What on Earth was this going to be about? I attended the session and the scales fell from my eyes. In what now seems obvious — but at the time was a revelation — I learned of the colossal energy demand of the Internet. This demand makes it the largest coal-fired machine on Earth, meaning that…

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Facebook Introduces An Analytics App for iOS and Android by @MattGSouthern

Now available for iOS and Android, the app will help businesses conveniently review their key metrics in a mobile interface.The post Facebook Introduces An Analytics App for iOS and Android by @MattGSouthern appeared first on Search Engine Journal. Source: https://www.searchenginejournal.com/feed/

Heyyy … Improved Hey! in Basecamp 3 for Android

Ping and Message excerpts, image previews, and grouped Campfires make catching up with Basecamp a breeze.There’s a new Hey! screen design in Basecamp 3 for Android. Hey! is already pretty good on Desktop and Web. Currently you get a chronological list of unread Campfires you’re following and discussions you’re part of.On Mobile, however, you’re probably peeking in for a quick summary of What’s New. Hey! should help you prioritize what’s important at that moment. A better design can save time.Here’s how the current Android Hey! and this new design compare:The new design (right) makes Hey! easier to parse and prioritize.✨ What We ImprovedShow me my Pings. Excerpts from unread Ping conversations are now shown at the top of the Hey! screen. If you have more than one unread Ping conversation they’ll be grouped together. You’ll see all your new Pings in one place. Note: All Pings are still accessible everywhere in the app via the…

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Native-Like Animations for Page Transitions on the Web

Some of the most inspiring examples I’ve seen of front end development have involved some sort of page transitions that look slick, like they do in mobile apps. However, even though the imagination for these types of interactions seem to abound, their presence on actual sites that I visit do not. There are a number of ways to accomplish these types of movement! Here’s what we’ll be building: Demo Site GitHub Repo We’ll build out the simplest possible distallation of these concepts so that you can apply them to any application, and then I’ll also provide the code for this more complex app if you’d like to dive in. Today we’ll be discussing how to create them with Vue and Nuxt. There are a lot of moving parts in page transitions and animations (lol I kill me), but don’t worry! Anything we don’t have time to cover in the article,…

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Hey hey `font-display`

Y’all know about font-display? It’s pretty great. It’s a CSS property that you can use within @font-face blocks to control how, visually, that font loads. Font loading is really pretty damn complicated. Here’s a guide from Zach Leatherman to prove it, which includes over 10 font loading strategies, including strategies that involve critical inline CSS of subsets of fonts combined with loading the rest of the fonts later through JavaScript. It ain’t no walk in the park. Using font-display is kinda like a walk in the park though. It’s just a single line of CSS. It doesn’t solve everything that Zach’s more exotic demos do, but it can go a long way with that one line. It’s notable to bring up right now, as support has improved a lot lately. It’s now in Firefox 58+, Chrome 60+, Safari 11.1+, iOS 11.3+, and Chrome on Android 64+. Pretty good. What do…

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