A Charming Example of How to Get Fired Through Facebook

rfp-robotRFP ROBOT: Website Request for Proposal Generator

The time has come for a new website (or website redesign), which means you need to write a website request for proposal or web RFP. A Google search produces a few examples, but they vary wildly and don’t seem to speak really to your goals for developing or redesigning a new website. You need to write a website RFP that will clearly articulate your needs and generate responses from the best website designers and developers out there. But how?

Have no fear, RFP Robot is here. He will walk you through a step-by-step process to help you work through the details of your project and create a PDF formatted website design RFP that will provide the information vendors need to write an accurate bid. RFP Robot will tell you what info you should include, point out pitfalls, and give examples.


Ahh social networking. Sometimes users are in such a hurry to vent through a status update that they don’t stop to remember who’s going to see it. And if you happen to say something negative about someone or something, the situation can quickly turn ugly.

Case in point: there’s a lovely jpeg floating around the Internet today that shows an employee venting about how much she hates her boss on Facebook, all the while forgetting that she is friends with her boss on Facebook. And once her boss saw it, he responded and promptly fired her. We posted the jpeg below so you can see the full encounter.

Now, however you may feel about this situation, it does pose an interesting query: where do you draw the line between personal and professional accounts in social networking?

Although we’ve talked about the added benefits of companies getting on Facebook and Twitter in the past, we’ve never really discussed the internal effects of employee personal and professional social interaction. After all, the communication channel is essentially a you-scratch-my-back-and-I’ll-scratch-yours situation. If a company treats their employees well, then those employees are more likely to say positive things through social media that enhance the company image. But if the tweeting or updating is all negative, you could end up taking each other down. For instance, take a look at the girl below that got fired. The things she said about her boss (whether they be true or not) certainly don’t make the company look good. Think about it: if you read that, would you want to go work there?

The most important thing to remember in the social networking age is visibility. It’s communication designed specifically so other people can see what you do and say. Personal profiles aren’t so different from professional profiles–both show a unique personality or brand. Companies need to remember that if they treat their employees badly, people are going to hear about it. Employees need to remember that if you lash out at your boss or company, then there’s a strong probability you’re going to get fired.

So how do you go about maintaining equilibrium between the two? Think before you tweet. Think before you update your status. Think before you comment, respond, post a link, upload a picture or video or anything else you can do on a social networking site. Companies and employees need to try to meet each other half way by finding their own personal and professional middle ground. After all, thousands of people will be watching.

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Posted on October 8, 2018 in Idaho Drupal Development, Illinois Drupal Development, Indiana Drupal Development, Iowa Drupal Development, Jacksonville Drupal Development, Jersey City Drupal Development, Kansas City Drupal Development, Kansas Drupal Development, Kentucky Drupal Development, Laredo Drupal Development, Las Vegas Drupal Development, Lexington-Fayette Drupal Development, Lincoln Drupal Development, Long Beach Drupal Development, Los Angeles Drupal Development, Louisiana Drupal Development, Louisville Jefferson County Drupal Development, Lubbock Drupal Development, Madison Drupal Development, Maine Drupal Development, Maryland Drupal Development, Massachusetts Drupal Development, Memphis Drupal Development, Mesa Drupal Development, Miami Drupal Development, Michigan Drupal Development, Milwaukee Drupal Development, Minneapolis Drupal Development, Minnesota Drupal Development, Mississippi Drupal Development, Missouri Drupal Development, Mobile Drupal, Mobile First Drupal, Modesto Drupal Development, Montana Drupal Development, Nashville-Davidson Drupal Development, Nebraska Drupal Development, Nevada Drupal Development, New Hampshire Drupal Development, New Jersey Drupal Development, New Mexico Drupal Development, New Orleans Drupal Development, New York Drupal Development, Newark Drupal Development, Norfolk Drupal Development, North Carolina Drupal Development, North Dakota Drupal Development, NY Drupal, Oakland Drupal Development, Ohio Drupal Development, Oklahoma City Drupal Development, Oklahoma Drupal Development, Omaha Drupal Development, Oregon Drupal Development, Orlando Drupal Development, Pennsylvania Drupal Development, Philadelphia Drupal Development, Phoenix Drupal Development, Pittsburgh Drupal Development, Plano Drupal Development, Portland Drupal Development, Raleigh Drupal Development, Reno Drupal Development, Rhode Island Drupal Development, Riverside Drupal Development, Rochester Drupal Development, Sacramento Drupal Development, San Antonio Drupal, San Antonio Drupal Development, San Antonio web design, San Diego Drupal Development, San Francisco Drupal Development, Santa Ana Drupal Development, Scottsdale Drupal Development, Seattle Drupal Development, Shreveport Drupal Development, Social Media, South Carolina Drupal Development, South Dakota Drupal Development, St. Louis Drupal Development, St. Paul Drupal Development, St. Petersburg Drupal Development, Stockton Drupal Development, Tampa Drupal Development, Tennessee Drupal Development, Tucson Drupal Development, Tulsa Drupal Development, Utah Drupal Development, Vermont Drupal Development

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